11 Year Old Jordan Brown Charged as Adult in Shooting Death ...


#1

[LEFT]Boy, 11, ‘gunned down dad’s pregnant girlfriend’ in US

Read more: Boy, 11, ‘gunned down dad’s pregnant girlfriend’ in US | BreakingNews.ie[/LEFT]

On Fox and Friends this morning, Alison Camerata asked why this kid should be tried as an adult? The logical answer is, “Why not?” Try him as an adult for committing a murder and if he is too small, simply get a smaller noose. It’s quite simple.


#2

Wood chippers can be rented in various sizes. The smaller ones are cheaper. Just sayin’.


#3

My first thought on this, it’s the fathers fault. Not only did he not raise his child with a proper respect of human life and weapons, but he did not properly secure the gun. If the child was having issues with the home situation, even more reason to keep the weapons locked up tight!


#4

What on Earth is the point of juvenile law if we’re going to try eleven-year-olds as adults?


#5

7 years for murder, 10 at most. Doesn’t seem quite right.


#6

But he’s a child! Put him in jail for ten years and he’s lost half his life and all of his adolescence - I wouldn’t underestimate how bad a punishment that is; I’ve lost most of my adolescence from that age because of my medical condition. Anyway, ten years is a much longer span for an eleven-year-old than it is for an adult. Time seems to go faster the older you are; that’s scientific fact; they’ve done experiments proving it. That’s why your childhood seems to take forever but your children’s childhood goes past in the blink of an eye. To you it might be “just” ten years, but to him that’s his entire life over again.


#7

Do you wonder if it might have something to do with what our children are being exposed to in school…or not, and in the entertainment industry??


#8

Sorry but when compared to the remaining life of the woman and the entire life of the unborn child which is more cruel? I’m not saying I have the answer for this question, but when weighing the lives of all three together it just doesn’t seem right to me.


#9

I think Suds is saying that you run the risk of ruining things for the kid. As you alluded to earlier, it seems likely that someone else really dropped the ball in raising this kid. Speaking as someone who came from a dysfunctional home, I can say that outside influences do matter a lot. Not the last word, but mitigating (unlike most of the drivel that defense attourneys offer the jury) in my opinion.

The woman is beyond our help, but the kid might be saved yet.


#10

No real judgment can be made until, as loathe as I am to say it, the report from the shrinks come in. Does the child understand what he has done? Does he feel remorse? Is there a violent history of any kind? Is the child capable of learning from this “event”? Ect…

There are just so many stories of gang bangers committing smiler crimes to “earn their stripes” and walking away after just a couple years. Yes I know this kid wasn’t a street thug and it’s a bad comparison, but it comes to mind. We have the best system in the world yet it’s full of so many holes.


#11

Well, for one thing, we don’t even know he’s guilty yet.


#12

How else are you going to protect you drugs. Must have loaded guns.


#13

Lock up the long guns until they come with a warrant. Use your conceal carry till then.


#14

The chances are that the kid will be released when he’s 18 and then go on to kill a couple more people. Is that the compassionate thing to do? Transfer our collective guilt to some poor soul who won’t see it coming, wow, aren’t we a caring people.

Jeesh, we don’t want to do the hard thing and put down a murderer because we wonder why “we” did this to him and then later wring our hands when he kills again later. I can see it now: “we’re sorry Mrs. Smith but we found your disemboweled daughter in a dumpster and the killer was someone we arrested for murder 8 years ago but you should feel good about that because we gave him another chance.”

It’s a fact of life that not all kids had perfect childhoods but very few kill people as a result. Could it be that this little murderer who doesn’t care and has no remorse is just plain old evil and no amount of nurturing or intervention can change that fact?


#15

I vote for the chiper.