20/20 hindsight lol


#1

Yes John, no one could see these things coming.

**Boehner full of regret over ‘fiscal-cliff’ moves **
By Russell Berman

Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) is sharing his regrets about his “fiscal-cliff” strategy, less than a month after the House bitterly swallowed a last-minute deal hatched in the Senate.

In a private speech to the Ripon Society on Tuesday, Boehner said that he should have taken a different course after the November election by immediately demanding that the Senate produce a bill to avert the worst parts of a combination of tax increases and spending cuts that were due to hit on Jan. 1.

Instead, Boehner delivered a formal speech at the Capitol on the day after President Obama won a second term, in which he offered a major Republican concession – new tax revenue as part of a broader fiscal deal.

“Looking back, what I should have done the day after the election was to make it clear the House has passed a bill to extend all of the current tax rates, the House has passed a bill to replace the sequester with cuts in mandatory spending, and the Senate ought to do its work,” Boehner said. “We’re ready, able and willing to work with the Senate as soon as they produce a bill. It should have been what I said. You know, again, hindsight is 20-20.

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#2

And now he’s saying that abortion should be the party’s primary concern this year?

Really, Boehner? You don’t think the economic situation or the middle class or education deserve a little more attention than abortion? And you’ll be alienating more people from the Republican Party.


#3

Well he has proven time and time again he has no economic talent. Maybe ending lives will prove to be his niche.


#4

NO…but nice spin.
"“In accordance with the will of the people, we will again work to pass the** No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act**, formally codifying the Hyde Amendment.”

“Let that be one of our most fundamental goals this year,”

I’m all for that…no reason we can’t walk and chew gum at the same time. We’ve got a lot of time on our hands in the House anyway since anything we send to the Senate simply disappears. As will this bill.


#5

Let’s see. The Senate hasn’t passed a budget in three years and Speaker Boehnor has retrospective regrets over his negotiating tactics. The Senate is full of Democrats who don’t give a damn, so let’s crucify Boehnor, who was elected as the most capable leader by the very people we elected…the few congressional members we like. Sh**, why don’t we just shoot ourselves in the foot? We’re going to put James Carville out of a job.

One might look at the Hurricane Sandy relief bill efforts, where the bill was broken up into three parts, and a majority (but still not enough) of Republicans in the House voted against the third pork-laden part.


#6

I’m more optimistic than Cam on the modern day version of the Hyde Amendment. Prior to Obamacare, the Hyde Amendment had no trouble being renewed year after year, by Democrat and Republican alike.


#7

Why any Conservative would accept a “Hindsight is 20/20” excuse from the House Speaker when every legitimate Conservative was saying that this exact (stupid) tactic that would do nothing but further Obama’s agenda would be Boehner’s strategy before he even did it is mind boggling.

Hindsight is 20/20 but that does not mean everything before us is a complete surprise, the Left have been duping these Establishment GOP idiots for years with this same tactic.

Boehner cannot possibly be this imbecilic, he is just searching for a spin that will afford him plausible deniability long enough to get his next Statist goal achieved. Conservatives who keep buying this load of Liberal B.S. from GOP leaders deserve no more than the warm feeling they get when these leaders tickle their ears with Conservative talking points just before surrendering another major Principle.


#8

I’d settle for a bit of ***fore***sight, some SPINE, and PRINCIPLES from Congressional Rs. Instead of quibbling the shape and pace of the handbasket this nation is in, this nation desperately needs to reverse our fiscal course and change our destination!


#9

I hear what you’re saying, Sway, and I’d like to quit beating up on the Speaker. And will just as soon as he starts exhibiting some leadership qualities, and quits beating up on his/our own party, himself. It’s the very Republicans you speak of who voted against all the pork in the Hurricane Sandy bill that Boehner just got through bashing:

More than half of the conference voted against both the fiscal-cliff deal and a subsequent bill providing aid to states affected by Hurricane Sandy. Boehner suffered 12 Republican defections during his reelection vote as Speaker early in January.“You have no idea the suspicions and the undercurrents that it caused, frankly, a lot of my members,” Boehner said of his negotiations with Obama. “It really has, in fact, caused somewhat of a breach that I’ve been in the middle of trying to repair.”
Boehner attributed the suspicions to the younger members in the Republican ranks…

Nice one, Boehner!

You speak to the Democrats being derelict in their duty to come forward with a budget. True enough.
At this point, at least half the country thinks it’s the Republican’s fault.
And it’s a no wonder when the very leadership of the Republican Party doesn’t come out swinging to correct the record!
It’s maddening!

Do you think I like it that I agree with RETT’s take? But facts is facts, and the fact of the matter is it’s incompetence and elitism out of the likes of Boehner and Preibus who are destroying the Republican Party by playing “Democrat Lite”, and getting in the way of decent Republicans doing exactly what we sent them there to do:
CUT THE SPENDING!
Which would ultimately put the Republicans on the winning side.

However, it appears they think they can win by scheming rather than by doing what’s right.


#10

Boehner is working for the democrats to help them push their agenda—everyone can see it except those GOP faithfuls who do not see it because they too agree with what the democrats are doing.


#11

I thought about responding to the above writers and their points individually, but considered that could create unnecessary tension and so decided to ask a question instead.

How many of you are in favor of shutting the government down? I don’t mean allowing the sequestration to take effect, I mean not raising the debt limit and thus requiring the president, in his role as executive, to start picking which bills and obligations we’ll pay. I’ll wait upon your answers.


#12

If a shut down is what it takes, so be it. IF, there is some sign that the debt will be seriously addressed. IF, there is some effort to cut the waste and excesses from government. IF, real spending cuts are proposed. Then raise the ceiling just a bit. Just enough to get through a couple months. If progress is being made, repeat the process. If it’s just business as usual, shut it down.


#13

Okay, there’s one.


#14

I have no problem with the government shutting down. I don’t recall an ounce of turmoil the last time it did, and I doubt half the population recalls that it did.

If the president were forced to address obligations, then maybe he would!


#15

We have two.


#16

The debt limit needs to be raised for stuff we’ve already promised to pay for. As in we have promised debts already, and if the debt limit is not raised to meet this, the confidence in the American dollar falls due to us failing to pay our debts. This happens every year with the threatening to not raise the debt ceiling, and without fail they always do it at the very last possible second. It’s a stupid political theater show.


#17

From the Department of the Treasury:

The debt limit is the total amount of money that the United States government is authorized to borrow to meet its existing legal obligations, including Social Security and Medicare benefits, military salaries, interest on the national debt, tax refunds, and other payments. The debt limit does not authorize new spending commitments. It simply allows the government to finance existing legal obligations that Congresses and presidents of both parties have made in the past.

Failing to increase the debt limit would have catastrophic economic consequences. It would cause the government to default on its legal obligations – an unprecedented event in American history. That would precipitate another financial crisis and threaten the jobs and savings of everyday Americans – putting the United States right back in a deep economic hole, just as the country is recovering from the recent recession.

Congress has always acted when called upon to raise the debt limit. Since 1960, Congress has acted 78 separate times to permanently raise, temporarily extend, or revise the definition of the debt limit – 49 times under Republican presidents and 29 times under Democratic presidents. In the coming weeks, Congress must act to increase the debt limit. Congressional leaders in both parties have recognized that this is necessary. Recently, however, a number of myths about this issue have begun to surface.


#18

Failing to increase the debt limit would have catastrophic economic consequences. It would cause the government to default on its legal obligations – an unprecedented event in American history

This is a flat out lie and anyone who belives it is extremely ignorant, right now the govt takes in about $220 billion per month and we owe $19 billion in interest on the debt, It would take a very long time to default. If we refused to raise the debt ceiling the money would have to come from another govt service


#19

Isn’t it about time to stop running up those bills, break the cycle and do something about the problem? Us “fringers” warn about the spending, vote against it, then take the crap when it comes time to pay for it. ENOUGH! Lets fix the problem! You folks are feeding the addict and dispersing blame everywhere except where it belongs!


#20

Indeed, something does need to happen, but it needs to be done by reducing spending and/or raising revenue, not by failing to raise the debt ceiling. That doesn’t solve the problem in the slightest, since that money has already been promised.