A Patriot Said It

I will post various quotations made by various Early American Patriots in this thread.

I’m just doing this for those who enjoy reading bits of wise, and not so wise, things said by some of our famous ancesters.

I don’t see this particular thread as necessarly a discussion forum. Perhaps we can discuss the entries made here, in a forum next door.

Many quotations posted here are gleaned from such sites as “The Federalist Patriot”

On Sunday, 5 June, we observed the first anniversary of the death of President Ronald Reagan. His passing was a bittersweet event for all American Patriots, especially those of us who knew him and were honored to be mentored by him. Though he is now in the company of Patriots in the most shining city of all, his spirit and legacy in this life are eternal. As noted in our Mission statement, The Federalist Patriot was founded in honor of President Reagan. Indeed, as noted by his son Michael Reagan, “The vision and legacy of the Reagan Revolution flourish on the pages of The Federalist Patriot.”

To read The Patriot’s tribute to our mentor, link to “The Twilight’s Last Gleaming” at –
http://Reagan2020.US/tributes/Alexander.asp

*"It is a singular advantage of taxes on articles of consumption that they contain in their own nature a security against excess.

They prescribe their own limit, which cannot be exceeded without defeating the end purposed – that is, an extension of the revenue." --Alexander Hamilton*

*“In the supposed state of nature, all men are equally bound by the laws of nature, or to speak more properly, the laws of the Creator.” --Samuel Adams *

“Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition.” --Thomas Jefferson

“What is it that affectionate parents require of their Children; for all their care, anxiety, and toil on their accounts? Only that they would be wise and virtuous, Benevolent and kind.”
[right]–Abigail Adams
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“Laws are made for men of ordinary understanding and should, therefore, be construed by the ordinary rules of common sense. Their meaning is not to be sought for in metaphysical subtleties which may make anything mean everything or nothing at pleasure.”
[right]–Thomas Jefferson
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[center]“There exists in the economy and course of nature, an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy, and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained.”

[right]–George Washington
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[center]“As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life; that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and prejudices conceal from our sight.”

[right]–Thomas Paine
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[center]“The most important consequence of marriage is, that the husband and the wife become in law only one person. … Upon this principle of union, almost all the other legal consequences of marriage depend. This principle, sublime and refined, deserves to be viewed and examined on every side.”

[right]–James Wilson
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“It is a wise rule and should be fundamental in a government disposed to cherish its credit, and at the same time to restrain the use of it within the limits of its faculties, ‘never to borrow a dollar without laying a tax in the same instant for paying the interest annually, and the principal within a given term; and to consider that tax as pledged to the creditors on the public faith.’”

[right]--Thomas  Jefferson[/right]

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“To cherish and stimulate the activity of the human mind, by multiplying the objects of enterprise, is not among the least considerable of the expedients, by which the wealth of a nation may be promoted.”

[right]–Alexander Hamilton[/right]

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“The operations of the federal government will be most extensive and important in times of war and danger; those of the State governments, in times of peace and security.”

[right]–James Madison, Federalist No. 45[/right]
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“This new world hath been the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty from every part of Europe. Hither have they fled, not from the tender embraces of the mother, but from the cruelty of the monster; and it is so far true of England, that the same tyranny which drove the first emigrants from home, pursues their descendants still.”

[right]–Thomas Pain[/right]
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“We have this day restored the Sovereign to whom alone men ought to be obedient.”

[right]–Samuel Adams,
reflecting on the original Independence Day[/right]

“One of the most essential branches of English liberty is the freedom of one’s house. A man’s house is his castle.”
[right]–James Otis (1761)
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“The Sun never shined on a cause of greater worth.”
[right] --Thomas Paine (1776)
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“I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost Us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will tryumph in that Days Transaction, even altho We should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not.”
[right]–John Adams (1776)
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“There is not a single instance in history in which civil liberty was lost, and religious liberty preserved entire. If therefore we yield up our temporal property, we at the same time deliver the conscience into bondage.”
[right]–John Witherspoon (1776)
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“Our cause is noble; it is the cause of mankind!”
[right]–George Washington (1779)
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“The American war is over; but this far from being the case with the American revolution. On the contrary, nothing but the first act of the drama is closed. It remains yet to establish and perfect our new forms of government, and to prepare the principles, morals, and manners of our citizens for these forms of government after they are established and brought to perfection.”
[right]–Benjamin Rush (1786)
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“[T]he flames kindled on the 4 of July 1776, have spread over too much of the globe to be extinguished by the feeble engines of despotism; on the contrary, they will consume these engines and all who work them. … The Declaration of Independence…[is the] declaratory charter of our rights, and the rights of man.”
[right]–Thomas Jefferson (1821)
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“On the distinctive principles of the Government …of the U. States, the best guides are to be found in…The Declaration of Independence, as the fundamental Act of Union of these States.”
[right]–James Madison (1825)
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“And it is no less true, that personal security and private property rest entirely upon the wisdom, the stability, and the integrity of the courts of justice.”
[right]–Joseph Story, *
Commentaries on the Constitution *(1833)
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“Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve.”

[right]– Benjamin Franklin
(Autobiography, 1771)

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“I leave you, hoping that the lamp of liberty will burn in your bosoms until there shall no longer be a doubt that all men are created free and equal.”
[right]-- President Abraham Lincoln
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[center]“Sometimes it is said that man can not be trusted with government of himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others? Or have we found angels in the forms of kings to govern him? Let history answer this question.”
[right]-- Thomas Jefferson
(First Inaugural Address, 3/4 1801)[/right]

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“I know that the Lord is always on the side of the right.
But it is my constant anxiety and prayer that I and this nation should be on the Lord’s side.”
[right]-- President Abraham Lincoln[/right]

“One single object…[will merit] the endless gratitude of the society: that of restraining the judgesfrom usurping legislation.”
[right]–Thomas Jefferson[/right]
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