A question just for veterans...

Would you recommend the military as a career…
If so why…

If not…

Sure, if its your bag, baby.

If not, then no.
It wasnt for me, but I do miss it.

[QUOTE=evilelvis]Would you recommend the military as a career…
If so why…

If not…[/QUOTE]

You ask a simple question that requires a complex answer. I think only certain people can have rewarding careers in the military.

Virtually every vocation in the civilian world has a counterpart in the military. Even “combat arms” occupations have a counterpart in civilian law enforcement. Although, it can be argued law enforcement agencies are paramilitary organizations themselves.

What sets the military life apart from civilian life? Military life is unique in many aspects. Military careers require you to be willing to uproot your family every 12-36 months to relocate to another part of the world. They require you to be willing to endure long separations from your family. Some branches of the military forces require you to live a Spartan lifestyle and can be both, grueling and physically demanding. Self-discipline is a requirement to succeed in a military life. You must have an unflinching dedication to the Service. You do not enter into a military career to order to amass a financial fortune. You will not even be able to survive on a military retirement, in most cases.

A military career requires dedication to a lifestyle alien to the life experience of most civilians. The military world is not a democracy, it is an autocracy. Not recognizing this difference can make military life unbearable. Failure to adapt to autocratic leadership will kill a military career. You have to be willing to submit to higher authority unquestionably. The old cliché “Question authority” has no place in the regimented military life. Orders are not “suggestions.” Success of operations require strict adherence to orders. Debating the merits of orders can get you killed.

For example, failure to respond instantly to, “Hit the deck” could result in the loss of life. This would not be a good career move.

I believe we should have mandatory Federal service. Every able citizen, male or female, should be required to serve a couple of years in some capacity. Even picking up trash in a National park is a service to country. This “service to country” could be part of a subsidized education plan.

All that said, I think everyone should “try” military life in the Reserves or Guard first. Find out if you can adapt to and enjoy the uniqueness of military regimen. Then, if the lifestyle fits, go for an active duty career. If it does not, you still have the benefit of learning more self discipline and have broaden your “life experience” without having invested years of your life. Moreover, you will have served your country. You will have helped defend the rights and liberties that allow you to make choices like this.

Last night my husband asked me a funny question. He wondered if I would ever have married military if given the chance. After yesterday’s attacks in London my first question back was “why, are you planning to join the royal brittish air force or something?”. anyway, he said ‘no’. But, it made me think. Back in my early single twenties I would have said “yes of course, what’s the big deal? I would be proud to.” Then, I thought about it with hessitation under what’s going on today. And it really hit me how much these families really sacrifice for us. We have watched several friends’ husbands going off to Iraq leaving new wives, and kids behind. It’s amazing to see how dif people handle it. Two I know of were so devestated. One guy got an early trip back home to stay because his wife was literally going nuts over him being in Iraq. Another is having her husband quit his militaary career three years short of his 20 years (which I commend him for doing for his wife).

I think it does take a certain kind of person to be able to serve in the military…esp with family, and in a time of uncertain war. It certainly takes a certain kind of spouse to be able to allow the other one to have a military career too.

But, this is just my spin on this ‘q’ from the wife’s perspective.

The Navy was my family I needed them and they needed me.

My wife was always saying things like “can’t somebody else do it” when I’d get a phone call at 3 or 4 am… NO it was MY job.

I streamlined electric motor repair procedures…

Sometimes I’d get so wrapped in work I’d forget to eat… sometimes we couldn’t eat…

Gave the Navy a patent (can’t say what for)…

Two pre-com units… taught guys how to read

Grief counselor

Came back from Gulf War I very sick… faceless paper-shufflers wanted to throw me out…

Two Captains personally testified on my behalf… came back from sea to do it.

Navy is family… some folks don’t get that

The Military is what you make of it. I know thats old but it is true. I got to see parts of the world that you may only see on TV or read about. Not only can it make you a better person but its the one job you will have where your retirement is rock solid Guarenteed to be there and they also give you an education for free in any job that you want to train in that will be usable in civilian life.

Downside for me is the fact that you have to work more hours then you can possibly imagin under the worse circumstnces but the payoff in the long run is imeasurable. Getting up at 5 Am to do execises and running from 2 miles to 8 Miles a day. working till who knows when and eating mess hall food when you don’t have cash to eat at Burger King is all part of the deal. Wearing the BDUs everyday gets old too. Sleeping in the woods ,sometimes without shelter from the rain is another thing I had to deal with and living in a fox hole isn’t that much better. All things considered every branch had good /bad things about it but there are somethings that you can’t get from working 9-5 in a civilain job that you will always take with you forever.

Wow!! Very interesting!! For me it is easy…if drafted I would go, but I would never join because of the weakness in the armed forces today. You give a man a rifle, and then tell him he cant shoot?? You tell him to defend, yet he cannot defend himself or his comrades if under fire??

I love the military and everything they have given us, but I think it is too PC for the likes of me. I have family and friends in the military, and there is a-lot of good and bad that they tell me. This humble citizen thinks (for himself) the bad is intolerable. I have no time for kid games…that was highschool…this is now.

[QUOTE=evilelvis]The Navy was my family I needed them and they needed me.

My wife was always saying things like “can’t somebody else do it” when I’d get a phone call at 3 or 4 am… NO it was MY job.

I streamlined electric motor repair procedures…

Sometimes I’d get so wrapped in work I’d forget to eat… sometimes we couldn’t eat…

Gave the Navy a patent (can’t say what for)…

Two pre-com units… taught guys how to read

Grief counselor

Came back from Gulf War I very sick… faceless paper-shufflers wanted to throw me out…

Two Captains personally testified on my behalf… came back from sea to do it.

Navy is family… some folks don’t get that[/QUOTE]

Well done RHMorgan and EE, my Navy career is winding to a close an for years I have heard the “youngans” talk about how the lifers are afraid to get out. They may have it partly right. I love the ability to walk into the Chief’s Mess and say “hey, guess what I get to put together” and get guys that laugh and join in the toil of my next “mission impossible”. We go to sea together, we eat together, we go ashore together, we argue all day and have a beer in some shithole port and the trouble goes aside until “turn-to” the next day. EE we do become family, but it is not for everyone. Do four years if you like it stick around. If you don’t get out and I’ll thank you for Honorable Service, don’t knock it til ya try it though.

:yeahthat: Bill ya hit it on the head… thanks shipmate

:beerchug: Bottoms up brother!

[QUOTE=Pale Horse]Wow!! Very interesting!! For me it is easy…if drafted I would go, but I would never join because of the weakness in the armed forces today. You give a man a rifle, and then tell him he cant shoot?? You tell him to defend, yet he cannot defend himself or his comrades if under fire??

I love the military and everything they have given us, but I think it is too PC for the likes of me. I have family and friends in the military, and there is a-lot of good and bad that they tell me. This humble citizen thinks (for himself) the bad is intolerable. I have no time for kid games…that was highschool…this is now.[/QUOTE]

The military is not a refuge from society as a whole. It is STILL of society. Society is TOO PC for me and I am in the “weak” military you speak of. I am not hampered in accomplishing the mission “touch-feely” bullshit stops when you get away from the “head-shed”. The game I enjoyed most was aiming the M2HB at an Iranian “fisherman” and seeing him instantly decide to chuck his brand-new AK-47 into the North Arabian Gulf by Umm Qassr

No military experiance from me, but I know “the game”. It is weak!!! I dont play games, or listen to “blow hards” tell me I will give them 20 or clean the head for doing my job. The military is not what it used to be . PERIOD… Women and so forth. I know what it takes on the street to get the job done, and we would lose a-lot less soliders if we stuck to (for example) Be all you can be…instead of an “army of one”:fuming: What the hell does that mean anyway???

I don’t know how it is now but when I was in the Navy if you could tough it out for 30 years you would retire ant a young age at full pay.

I would have been 48 had I stayed in. I would have been retired for 12 years now with more to go. 20 20 hind sight.

Thank you for your point of view anyway.

Navy Chief sends.:no:

[QUOTE=Ld-Richard]I don’t know how it is now but when I was in the Navy if you could tough it out for 30 years you would retire ant a young age at full pay.

I would have been 48 had I stayed in. I would have been retired for 12 years now with more to go. 20 20 hind sight.[/QUOTE]
Twenty years active service allows you to retire with
50% of your base pay at your highest earned paygrade.
Thirty years active service allows you to retire with
75% of your base pay at your highest earned paygrade.

Reservists must accumulate at least “twenty good years” in order to retire. Then wait until the 60th birthday to start drawing retirement pay.
A “good year” is one where the Reservist earns at least 50 retirement points.
The Reservist earns one retirement point for each day of active duty and one point for each four hour drill (there are 2 drills for Saturday and for Sunday.
Sometimes the unit will have what is called a MUTA Five, this is where a single drill is performed on a Friday or Monday, in conjunction with the drill weekend.

Reserve reitrement pay is a mathmatical formula that is computed using the total number of points garnered over the entire career.

Typically a 20 year Reserve career earns less than a 20 year active duty career.

Thanks for the info rhmorgan. Either I misunderstood what I read or things have changed from 1967 when I got out (+ 2 yrs. inactive reserve). Honerably discharged. I was proud to serve my country. and a pox on all those who ran to Canada.

I would not recommend it for women. I would like to see the
old WAC (Women’s Army Corp) come back. THEN I’d recommend it.
It was just too crass … and honestly I was a weak link in my
unit when I was with the Second Armored Divison. I was only
105 pounds and I couldn’t do the physical work that I was
required to do. I always got the tanker guys to help me with it.
(the Chaplain’s jeep … I couldn’t get tires off, couldn’t get nuts
on, couldn’t do much maintenance at all, and it was required in
my job).

Women’s Army Corp … THEN I’d recommend it for women.
Otherwise … nope. I don’t recommend it.

Women should be given an outlet to serve their country. I joined the Army. I wish they had the WAC. It would have been better for me and
for the guys.

Do you mean that youre not going to be 48 since you got out?

Naw, he means he’s way past that - and wishful thinking that he could have been on military retirement for the last 13 years.

http://webpages.charter.net/connectingzone/armed/28.gif

Todays military is no game…it is life or death. An Army of One means that it takes all of us to make an Army, you can still be all that you can be. How would you know if the military is not what it used to be if you’ve never been in the military. If you have a specific example please share it with us. Those blow hards that you speak of are building discipline and teamwork into folks that have been individuals on the street. :no: