A question just for veterans...


#61

Since I served 22 years in the Marine Corps the question is a moot point but I do agree that it is not for everyone. I would still do it over again, even the two tours in Vietnam because there is a pot at the end of the rainbow. I retired at 39 and started receiving a pension which goes up every year in the same amount as Social Security and I get free medical care.

After I retired I went to work in a factory and it was no different than the service. They tell you what to do just like the military, not directly but indirectly because if you don’t conform you get fired. I was basically told when I was going to sleep, eat and take my vacations.

I have had a lot of friends who told me that they wished they had stayed in.

We have an all volunteer force now and the powers to be in the military do not want a draft because they want people who want to be in.

Thundergrunt


#62

It is true that you get 50% for 20 years and 75% for 30 years of your base pay but for every year after 20 and before 30 you get 2 1/2% for each year. There was also something about anything over 6 months being counted as a year because I remember a lot of Marines retiring on 19 years and 6 months.

I guess we have an equality issue with women serving in the military in combat skills. I just am not ready to see mothers, wives and daughters come back in body bags but that is what we have today.

But I will have to say that the women I served with did a good job at what they were assigned to do. In some areas i.e. airplane maintenance they are sometimes better because of the dexterity with their hands.

Thundergrunt


#63

Thanks for your service. What is the question directed at veterans?


#64

Currently serving, just got done with 15 months in Iraq. Got my SGT in 2 years, 1 month - and could easily make 7 in 7. I plan on getting out, toying with the idea of going WO. I’m done with enlisted, but many of my friends have re-enlisted.

I highly suggest anyone considering joining up to do 4 years active. It is a steady paycheck. You make a difference, even if you don’t immediately see it. It makes you a better person, a better American, and makes you appreciate all America has to offer, especially if you deploy. After 4 years, if you want to get out, no one will ever fault you - you have done more for the country then most Americans ever will.

There are two types of people who join the Service:

  1. For the paycheck (or because they have to, no other options, court-ordered, etc)

  2. For the ideology (defense of the nation, patriotic duty, etc.)

Of course it can be a mix of reasons, as it was for me. I always wanted to join up for the patriotic duty, but I also wanted the paycheck and bonus. I guess one day I was sick of being poor and decided to change my situation. If you are solely in the first category, you will hate your life in the service. If you at least believe a little bit of the second category - you will enjoy your job - even on “those” days. I enjoy my job, very much.

I guess we have an equality issue with women serving in the military in combat skills.

My sister-in-law is an MP and is currently in Afghanistan. And is very much involved in combat. The inequality is quickly dissolving.


#65

Yes, if you feel it inside you to serve, sacrifice, and endure.

Yes, if you have no direction and want to find one in life.

Yes, if you have need to prove something to yourself.

Yes, if you are looking to change your life, and have true determination and dedication to do so.

Yes, if you need a way to get a skill, or education that you cannot do otherwise, and don’t mind sacrificing your freedom to do it.


#66

YES,
It teaches you disclipine, leadership and selflessness.
Spent 10 years in the Army 2 tours in Iraq and I think that at some point people to to be part of something that is bigger them them, service to their country, in any fashion. There are things that you will learn in the military they you will never learn in civilian life.

As far as inequality for women, anyone that has served in OIF and OEF knows that there are no longer front line and in the rear with the gear, everyone is basicly fair game. Some of the women are actually better shots than the men.

But it’s also not for everyone, but I would highly suggest it to anyone.


#67

Sergeant James Hayden USMC Retired.

I made a career out of the marines that is right up until I was injured and received a medical discharge. That was when my real education began. In February 1979 I was officially turned over to the Veterans Administration. I have been admitted into 10 Veterans Hospitals and I have seen Veterans tied to their wheel chairs, their teeth pulled for biting a VA nurse who was prepping him for yet another unnecessary surgical procedure, I have seen VA nurses and doctors kill their veteran patients simply because their conditions took up too much of their time and they needed the bed space for less demanding Veteran patients. At one time I has 120 copies of Veteran’s Death Certificates sent to me by the Veterans spouses. I received 5 Veteran’s Death Certificates their spouses had been given 3 to 4 different deat6h certificates signed by different doctors and listing different causes of death.

The medical care given our disabled Veterans is a disgrace as our disabled Veterans are used by college professors as training aids to demonstrate their surgical and medical procedures for their students, our disabled Veterans are used for inhumane human experiments, our Disabl3ed Veterans are used by interns and residences as living practice dummies so they can practice their newly learned surgical techniques on.

Then there is the Department of Veterans Affairs Adjudications System of remands after remands and denials after denials.

I have survived America’s Killing Fields and I would NOT recommend military service to anyone until after I have had a change to fix the current military and Veteran’s health care systems.

My name is Jim Hayden and I AM the next American President
Jim Hayden for President 2012


#68

[quote=“the_direct0r, post:64, topic:1209”]
Currently serving, just got done with 15 months in Iraq. Got my SGT in 2 years, 1 month - and could easily make 7 in 7. I plan on getting out, toying with the idea of going WO. I’m done with enlisted, but many of my friends have re-enlisted.

I highly suggest anyone considering joining up to do 4 years active. It is a steady paycheck. You make a difference, even if you don’t immediately see it. It makes you a better person, a better American, and makes you appreciate all America has to offer, especially if you deploy. After 4 years, if you want to get out, no one will ever fault you - you have done more for the country then most Americans ever will.

There are two types of people who join the Service:

  1. For the paycheck (or because they have to, no other options, court-ordered, etc)

  2. For the ideology (defense of the nation, patriotic duty, etc.)

Of course it can be a mix of reasons, as it was for me. I always wanted to join up for the patriotic duty, but I also wanted the paycheck and bonus. I guess one day I was sick of being poor and decided to change my situation. If you are solely in the first category, you will hate your life in the service. If you at least believe a little bit of the second category - you will enjoy your job - even on “those” days. I enjoy my job, very much.

My sister-in-law is an MP and is currently in Afghanistan. And is very much involved in combat. The inequality is quickly dissolving.
[/quote]Back in my day there was the draft so joining was not the issue. Sure people could join back in that time but the males had to sign up and could be called.

Now I know a young guy I went to college with in the 80’s who after graduating could not find a job and joined the military even though he had a degree in computer language.


#69

That’s my time-frame as well, before there was even a lottery system. IMO, everyone turning 18 should serve a minimum of 2 years with an option to remain. This teaches our youth so much about life and would make it so much more difficult for politicians to get us involved in war. Service to ‘country’ is an awesome learning experience.


#70

There was no draft, but registration was required at the time FC was enlisted. He kept getting notifications to register long after he enlisted. One of them was even sent to the base where he was located.


#71

In part, I agree.

I saw bloody, crusty bandages on GI’s left in gurneys in hallways at the VA Horsepistol. I have a service-connected disability…

When I first went to a VA hospital about it, I was essentially told: “Yeah, you have a Purple Triangle on your records. Go eat crap and die – we are busy.”

It was… well… shattering.

Thirty-odd years later, two generals were FIRED and the VA system was thoroughly shaken up and revamped. I was informed of this by a buddy ex-GI who exhorted me to return.

I found the new VA to be wonderful.

So all you said in the above WAS true. Once.

Different now.


#72

Glad to hear that. Although I understand that it varies from location to location.


#73

Go for it understanding the sacrifice you may be asked to pay someday. Serve honorably.


#74

[quote=“Unca_Walt, post:71, topic:1209”]
In part, I agree.

I saw bloody, crusty bandages on GI’s left in gurneys in hallways at the VA Horsepistol. I have a service-connected disability…

When I first went to a VA hospital about it, I was essentially told: “Yeah, you have a Purple Triangle on your records. Go eat crap and die – we are busy.”

It was… well… shattering.

Thirty-odd years later, two generals were FIRED and the VA system was thoroughly shaken up and revamped. I was informed of this by a buddy ex-GI who exhorted me to return.

I found the new VA to be wonderful.

So all you said in the above WAS true. Once.

Different now.
[/quote]I have been to a VA hospital several times and it looks a little antiquated but they recently put a clinic closer to home.


#75

I agree. I have several friends in the military. I have a high level of respect for those that chose to join. I would do so myself if it wasn’t for my physical build. I am far to skinny to meet their standards.(dang metabolism)


#76

The members of my Family have been in the service of the people of America since 150 years before there WAS a United States.

The first tiny bit of self-rule began in the tavern and tap house of Jan Snedeker with the formation of The Twelve Men on Pearle Street in Nieuw Amsterdam. I wrote a book about this man’s incredible life. It is available on NOOK, Kindle (Amazon) or hardcopy.

The book is 562 pages, 36 illustrations. All the characters are real, and all the events occurred as depicted.

If you have a NOOK or Kindle, you can download the first five chapters free. For a signed and personally inscribed hardcopy, look here:

Jan Snedeker – The Cadet

Scroll to the bottom of the website to read an excerpt (the incredible incident happened as depicted).

My uncle was Lieutenant General Snedeker, Commandant of the Marine Corps.

My cousin was Captain of the A/C carrier Iwo Jima. He is now on the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

I would serve my country (again) with the VA or without.


#77

Absolutely! Service in the military offers a lot of advantages, the most important of which is the ability to reset your life. Going beyond the patriotism and service-to-country reasons, a career offers for many a well-paid internship where an enlistee can learn a marketable skill. If they enjoy the military life and want to make it a career, there is professional advancement. The military also offers the highest level of responsibility so early in a person’s career. For example, take an 18-year old. Where else are they given as much responsibility within a short span of time for their own actions and for leading others – all of which comes with promotions? Also, if a soldier decides that they have made a mistake in their choice of specialty or career field, when their term of service is up they can leave and use their education benefits to get into something else. As another example (from a former girlfriend), what if a dental technician decides that they really don’t like spit and sticking their fingers into other people’s mouths? As a civilian it can be very hard to change careers at that point. Not so with the military. And despite what the various race- and victimhood-mongers tell you, race, ethnicity, sex or origin are not factors in success. For the lower class especially, military service offers a way to break out of generations of family poverty, in an honorable way.


#78

UNCA WALT, I have ancestors who arrived in New Amsterdam in the 1620’s, one family, Delanoy’s from Holland, the other, DeMilt, from Normandy. Delanoy was Dutch Anglican, DeMilt was French Huguenot. New Amsterdam was not so populated at the time, may our forefathers knew each other.
Cheers:beerchug:


#79

I joined the Air Force when I was 18 years old and served 20 active duty years (73-93) and then retired. I gave-up my most productive years that I could have used as a civilian doing something else. When you first join the military, it is a life style changing event . When you take your oath, you promise…
**
The Oath for Enlisted: **

The Oath of Enlistment for enlisted:

*“I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.”


**The Oath for Officers: **

*“I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the _____ (Military Branch) of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservations or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God.” *


When you take the oath, you are agreeing to a contract with the military and the military takes that contract and oath very seriously when you agree to it.

The lifestyle is regimented and covered by many regulations and operating procedures. In other words, procedure, procedure and more procedure drives the military way. Team work is essential…period!

When you join the military, you are subject to the whim of the military. In other words…“How high do you want me to jump sir?” The military own you!

All that said…

If you plan to join the military to make it a career; great! However, be advised you really will not know if it’s a good career path until you actually join and experience it. As for an active duty career choice it can be a hard road to travel each and every day. For the Reserves and Guard, I suspect it would be easier to hang in there until you have enough time (credits) to qualify for retirement because you serve part time and not every single day for 20 years. Joining the Reserve or Guard will take you far longer to equal 20 years of active duty military and you don’t draw your retirement money immediately once you finish your time.

Bottom line, military life is not easy, but as time progresses you do get use to the regimentation; it becomes “normal”. After 20 years of active duty, the transition to civilian life again has its problems. Because at this point, living so long in a regimented environment you have have become "institutionalized.

I have been retired for 19 1/2 years now and do cherish those assignments I had and the people I worked with; good memories and bad. Served all my time during the Cold War, while Reagan had two terms as President and as my Command-in-Chief; the best! In a nutshell, most of my career had to do with implementing Emergency War Orders (EWO) which required a Top Secret security clearance with special access to very sensitive material. Made sure conventional and nuclear assets were off and running, heading to target(s). I was proud of what I did and accomplished. I love my nation and this is why I’m fighting for it again with the written word of truth and an occasional donation.

You heard from an old school guy. Ask a modern day recruiter about the military; certainly many changes have come down “the pike” since my day.


#80

I was 5’-8" and weighed 92 LBS. when I joined the Navy at 17. When I graduated from boot camp I weighed 125 and was still 5’-8". I spent 18 weeks in a U.S.Navy Class “A” School (radio school) at Norfolk Virginia and graduated weighing 140 LBS. I eventually stopped at 5’-9" and 145 LBS and have weighed within a few pounds either way since.
I don’t know how they do it now, but in 1962 they took anyone who could bend over and cough and had four limbs, ten fingers and ten toes. Boot camp culled out the “undesirables”. One of my school aquaintances was sent home when he started crying. He was a big tough looking guy.
Give it a shot, you may be surprised.