Alex Jones Banished


#81

It’s a fact that countries with High immigration + free trade, do better than countries who have neither.

It’s been the argument of Austrian economists for 50 years, and they have ample data backing them on that.

It’s curious to me that conservatives say they’re for free markets, yet don’t consult the data when it comes to this issue.

In fact they’re surprised when economists tell them that more immigration is good, acting as if they made this up on the spot, when no, they’ve been saying it. 50 years. Hey Johnny, you come lately?


#82

Nonsense. Ask ANY German how unrestricted immigration has benefited Germany in spite of its basically free-market. Is your post REALLY that ignorant about what’s been going on in Europe for the past 30 years?


#83

No, check where they are on Labor Freedom Dave:

https://www.heritage.org/index/country/germany#regulatory-efficiency

If you don’t let the immigrants work, if you only invite most of them in to sit around in tents or warehouses, guess what happens?


#84

Not liars, necessarily, but often capable of making ignorant assertions…with the possible exception of Thomas Sowell, who, in my not so humble opinion, is generally BRILLIANT.


#85

Yes, he is rather excellent in the same way that Milton Friedman is excellent. And he’s even right about almost everything, including tariffs.

For me, the top two people, most correct most all the time, are Sowell and Friedman. I wonder what ignorant assertions Friedman you think Friedman – or Sowell – have made.And why you think they’re wrong.


#86

I don’t think either of them understand what President Trump is DOING with regard to tariffs and their threat…much like several people on this forum. I don’t believe the President WANTS to impose tariffs on ANY country. I believe that he’d MUCH prefer that NO country imposed tariffs on other countries…including us. I think he understands that sometimes tariffs are the only means available to punish trading partners for predatory behaviors and uses them sparingly as a consequence. Often, the very THREAT of a tariff is enough to whip recalcitrant trading partners into ceasing and desisting those behaviors. We are a consumer nation and as such, the greatest market on the planet. No country wants to be shut out of our markets and tariffs, or their threats, are merely one means of keeping trading partners in line.


#87

No, the understand, they’re willing to acknowledge it won’t work, and that Trump is sticking us with the consequences all the same.

You can’t avoiding admitting that this is a judgement call Dave, and past experience, would say it’s a poor one.


#88

There IS no “past experience” comparable to what President Trump is doing, AS.


#89

BS, Bush tariffs and the Plaza accords.

One was forcible attempt at negotiation, the other was a negotiation. They both sucked.


#90

Nonsense. Bush imposed tariffs to raise money. That’s NOT what President Trump is doing and I think you actually know it.


#91

I don’t think President Trump understands what he is doing with tariffs.

We’re still waiting.

Most of our trade with Canada is tariff-free, so what’s up with Trump, Canada and NAFTA? Is it all about the milk and chickens? We have a trade surplus with Canada. So what in the world is the president after with Canada?

Yes, there really is. This isn’t America’s first rodeo.

Bush’s reasoning was identical to the reason Trump has repeated for 40 years – if not the 387 other excuses he gives because this reasoning is indefensible and because “national security” is the only official reason he can unilaterally impose tariffs (Congress needs a beating for allowing that to continue). The rationale behind President Bush’s steel tariff:

‘I take this action to give our domestic steel industry an opportunity to adjust to surges in foreign imports, recognizing the harm from 50 years of foreign government intervention in the global steel market, which has resulted in bankruptcies, serious dislocation and job loss,’ said Bush. ‘We also must continue to urge our trading partners to eliminate global inefficient excess capacity and market-distorting practices, such as subsidies.’


#92

:laughing: Good line!


#93

Nonsense. We’ve already gotten Mexico to the table as well as Europe (or some of it). Secondly, Our trade with Canada is HARDLY tariff-free. They impose a 200% tariff on U.S. dairy, for Pete’s sake.


#94

And that’s enough for you? We impose a 25-percent tax on foreign pickups. We’ve taxed Americans for importing sugar since the beginning of the nation. We impose many more tariffs already.

If one item is enough to demand a trade war, then a lot of people have a righteous bone to pick with Americans.


#95

Oh BS, RWNJ! You KNOW that there are many more tariffs that Canada imposes on American products and goods.


#96

Yeah, not really finding them. They’ve subsidized their timber (taxing their own people to sell timber at a loss). Beyond that, I cannot quickly find any. I tried. As I understand it, trade between Canada and the United States has been relatively tariff-free. If you can find some sort of list, share it with me. Until I hear otherwise, I’m going to accept the claim that few tariffs existed between our two countries.

Even the milk issue isn’t a straight-up thing,. Canada was responding to us the same way we’re responding to other countries, like China. Their argument for milk is tied to our “welfare rats” in the dairy industry, you know the subsidized agricultural industry that undercuts foreign traders. I borrow the term welfare rats to refer to farmers who are subsidized – the term used here on this site by some to refer to domestic farm victims of Trump’s trade war.

Which leads me to wonder, are soybean farmers now welfare rats since Donald Trump is now subsidizing them in response to the response to his trade war?

FYI, the United States imposes a 350-percent tariff on tobacco and 160 percent on shelled peanuts. It’s not like other nations charging us tariffs are really being “unfair.” We honestly sound like a bunch of hypocritical crybabies when we complain about tariffs.Although as an average across all goods, 2.8 percent, America was apparently one of the lowest import taxers in the world. Now we’re acting stupider, just like the rest of the world. Exciting!

The bottom line is we’re charging tariffs because Donald Trump thinks we’re losing an existing “trade war” because we have trade deficits. He doesn’t appear to differentiate international partners with whom we have surpluses. We still don’t have “deals” or “gains” from South Korea or Mexico or Europe. We’ve gone to the table with China already too, but the president is inflicting even more taxes on the American people as a result.

And the trade deficit with China is still growing!


#97

So in the last 20 years, Canada has not once cracked 2% growth and averages closer to 1%. And this is your example of the wonders that cultural miscegenation provides.

I actually agree with you. When a 1st world country becomes an immigration dumping ground, you can expect a 1-2% growth rate while the native population holds out.


#98

? Yes it has, you need to adjust for inflation:


#99

Lol. Using constant prices since the 1980s.

Oh look, according to constant price GDP Russia has had a sustained growth rate of about 6% over the last 25 years


#100

Again “?” Russia was a steadily growing petro-power in the early 2000s. That performance checks out. It’s because he gave Russia that performance, that the Russian people stand so staunchly behind Putin… and by how he dealt with separatists.

The data goes to 2014, which is when the sanctions began. You’ll note they had less than 1% growth that year.