AZ Bill Would Require Students Take Oath Before Graduating


#1

See text here

The oath:

I, _________, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge these duties; so help me God.


#2

They shouldn’t require people to take the oath to graduate, there is no way you can take the oath freely if they are withholding something from you that was earned rightfully.

It is fine that people who willingly become government employees take the oath because they know that it is a condition of employment and can take it freely, but the state also requires compulsory education, and they have no opportunity to not take the oath, which violates their rights because they may not believe in the constitution and the government that it created. (Of course, the state is trying to force you to believe in it, so of course they will make you swear allegiance to it)


#3

Here is the current full text of the bill:

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Arizona:

Section 1. Title 15, chapter 7, article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding section 15-701.03, to read:

15-701.03. Graduation requirement; constitutional oath

Beginning in the 2013‑2014 school year, In addition to fulfilling the course of study and assessment requirements prescribed in this chapter, before a pupil is allowed to graduate from a public high school in this state, the principal or head teacher of the school shall verify in writing that the pupil has recited the following oath:

I, _________, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge these duties; So help me God.

I oppose this, as I oppose mandated “community service” graduation requirements, as being unrelated to the purpose of schools, education. It is the parents’ (and family’s) role to teach children the value of this country and of things like charitable service. Not the state, which can misuse loyalty oaths and twist “qualification” as “valid” community service.


#4

If a private school wants to require this, that’s cool. The folks signing up know it ahead of time and can seek other places to get education if they wish.


#5

Totally oppose. Much of why, Eleph contributed, but stop at ‘because education in public schools is complusary’.
However, if anyone graduating from a school in this country doesn’t share allegience to it, I invite him to shop elsewhere.

How depressing this should even come about.
My parents instilled a sense of patriotism in me; the school reinforced it.
It was a matter of course.

I’ll reinforce this idea of Arizona’s when they can prove that they thoroughly schooled their students in the Constitution.
Until then, shut-up and teach!


#6

if it is a private school then fine let them do what they wish. If it is a public school then NO! That is an oath for public office or other government jobs and should not be a requirement to graduate from a **public **school.


#7

It’s not like any so-called public officials keep it, anyway. Why would they? It’s not like they have much to go on these days.

As has been said, vociferouly, they aren’t pledging themselves to public office upon graduation, so it isn’t the school to insist they do. Pledge themselves, I mean.

But what’s so sad is that I learned the pledge of allegience priot to kindergarden, was proud to place my hand over my heart, was proud as can BE that my grandkids do so in school…
Yes, I learned to recite, and yes, it wasn’t until later that the meaning of the words hit me. But that’s the way good things are taught. Give 'em the words, let 'em figure it out later. ANY thinking child, if you’ve done your job, will.

So maybe what’s trying to be instilled here is, “Did you mean it?”


#8

The oath of allegiance didn’t exist until the late '50’s. Right after Sputnik went up, I think. But I really don’t think it means a thing any more.


#9

part of the oath says “I take this obligation freely” if you are forced to take the oath then doesnt it already break itself?


#10

I believe you should be able to affirm rather than swear if you want to.

That said I would still oppose this bill.


#11

Only slightly contradictory.

Thank you for pointing that out.
And, yup.


#12

Ridiculous.

Maybe we can swear fealty to the church while we’re at it too.


#13

Late 50’s? I started school in 1950 and I don’t remember not openning the school day without the pledge of allegience.

I believe an oath of allegience to the Constitution Of The United States should be required for Citizenship, but not to the Government of the United States.


#14

To survive, we need a strong sense of Nationalism, otherwise we continue to weaken and eventually shatter into anarchy.


#15

Maybe she meant in its present form. I know that added “under God” around about that time, to combat those God-hating commies.


#16

Not the pledge of Allegiance, the oath of allegiance. Two different things altogether. I agree that that the oath of allegiance should be required for citizenship.

On edit: PeteS quoted the oath of allegiance in one of his posts above. Theoretically, you are required to “swear” to it before a witness, but that is seldom practiced, to my knowledge. I have to sign it every year as a “government” employee (township auditor, but this is my last year), but that’s all I do, sign it and give it to the twp secretary.


#17

My in-laws, who immigrated from another country, refused the oath under religious principles, and were granted citizenship.

THAT’S WRONG!