Be Careful of some so-called Charities


#1

Battle erupts in California over clothes donation bins

A political fight over charity collection bins is brewing in California, where property owners complain that the boxes are sometimes dropped onto their land without permission, becoming magnets for graffiti and shelter for transients.

Goodwill Industries International, the most established of such U.S. charities, has pushed for years for regulation of donation bins, and a California state senator has taken up the cause with a bill that would make it easier for property owners to have unauthorized bins towed away.

[http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/06/usa-charity-fight-idUSL2N0CR1OT20130406

T](http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/06/usa-charity-fight-idUSL2N0CR1OT20130406)his is a twist I never knew about but it makes sense in I have read about other scams claiming to be for charity but really is a money maker for the individual or group.

Around here there used to be Goodwill boxes but I have not seen one for years unless they are in areas I seldom go to.

I do know we have Purple Heart, Amvets, and other charities that call and ask for donations and even a store where one can drop off clothing.


#2

I haven’t seen Goodwill or Salvation Army drop boxes for years. Both places have a central location in the local towns to which you can take things and there is staff to help you do so.


#3

I think they discontinued the drop boxes, because a lot people started throwing their trash into them.


#4

[quote=“Susanna, post:3, topic:38971”]
I think they discontinued the drop boxes, because a lot people started throwing their trash into them.
[/quote]I remember once seeing someone had put furniture out that was ripped up next to a drop box


#5

“There’s big money in charity”…and my faith in humanity drops a little at that sentence.


#6

If, instead of giving through a charitable organization (although there is much to be said for some of them) you give personally where you know the need is, that is a most rewarding act. Of course, giving where you know the need is can be through a reputable charitable organization, too. Aside from my church, my biggest gifts are to the American Bible Society, earmarked for Bibles for China. They can print Bibles in China now, but they just can’t print them fast enough. The money that I give through the ABS buys paper to print these Bibles - and $1 supplies the paper for the printing of 1 Bible. I also help support a missionary family (aside from the ones that are supported directly by my church [denomination]) through the mission organization they are under. I know this is reliable, too, since the family I help support is that of my niece, her husband, and their 2 little children - both of whom were born in Africa - the oldest in Uganda, and the latest in South Africa.


#7

That’s because some areas, like the commie county to the North of me, charge too much money throwing trash away. THey charge $1 a bag for normal trash. They charge by weight if you drive up with a pick up truck full. They have started bringing their trash into my county because there is no charge. My county is considering charging just to keep the people from the commie county from filling up our compactor sites so that the county residents can still get rid of their trash.


#8

In Vicksburg they had a few of the drop boxes, I don’t know who ran them. I think they were for the local homeless shelter.

Anyhow, Wife used to tell me about how they’d catch the same couple of homeless dudes throwing feces into the bins, and uriniating in them, and making other deposits that I won’t describe. This was a perpetual thing.

One of them went by the nickname of Kung-Fu, so named for his awesome martial arts skills that he would demonstrate at passing police cars.


#9

How sad that donation places either have to be manned or locked to keep the dregs of society from defacing them; obviously making it yet more difficult to give AND receive.

This area, along w/Salvation Army, has Share & Care, and Helping Hands; all three of which deserve the communities’ utmost support. Sadly, it’s sometime difficult to get to them when they’re open.