Bernie Sanders: Capitalist Pig


Bernie Sanders: Capitalist Pig
Posted: 27 Jun 2017 05:54 PM PDT
When Bernie Sanders first came to Vermont, he bought a shack with a dirt floor with unemployment money. Last year, Bernie joined the company of Vermont’s 1% and bought his third home. money that Bernie used his way to break the $1 million mark and buy his way into the 1% came from the $27 donors he touted during his campaign. Other campaigns were funded by billionaires. But the folks paying for Bernie’s private Delta 767 with its menu of herb crusted lamb loin, chocolate ganache, fine cheeses and white wine were ordinary people who would never be allowed to fly on it.

Bernie could live large on their donations, but he couldn’t directly pocket their money. Not unless he figured out how to sell them something of his own. And that’s how Bernie joined the 1%.

Our Revolution, Bernie’s book, which was also the name of his new organization, sold for $27. According to Bernie, that was the average size of his donations. The actual number was $86, but truth and Bernie have always had only the loosest of relationships. And Bernie supporters were no longer giving $27 to subsidize a campaign, a cause, Bernie’s jet and his consultants, but his wallet and his summer home.

Bernie sold his supporters for $27 a head to a multinational corporation in exchange for $795,000. His book is named after Our Revolution, a 501©(4) “social welfare” organization that he set up to influence elections and which can accept unlimited amounts of money from donors without disclosing them.

According to Our Revolution’s former organizing director, it was set up that way to “take big checks from billionaires.”

Bernie Sanders can’t legally be involved in running his own organization. But he can cash in on a book which has the same name as that organization. The distinctions are bound to be lost on his supporters just as they didn’t understand what it meant when Bernie didn’t cap the commissions of his consultants.

There’s nothing with making a lot of money. Unless you’re Bernie, in which case you make money by insisting that it’s deeply immoral for other people to be making money. Especially the evil 1 percent.

But that $1 million puts Bernie over the 1% in Vermont. Entry level for the 1% in Vermont is $299,259.

Bernie made three times more than the people he has been denouncing up and down the country. Many of those dreaded 1 percenters are professionals who, unlike Bernie, work for a living, and also unlike him, don’t own three homes or fly private chartered jets around the world to meet the Pope

Bernie made more than the $735,607 average 1% income in Vermont. He didn’t just join the 1%. He joined the 0.5%. And he did it by monetizing his supporters. When he tells them that he’s fighting for the little guy, he neglects to mention that he means only one little guy named Bernie.

The average income in Burlington is $54,810. Bernie could buy and sell those little guys.

“The problem is that the great wealth and potential of this country rests with a handful of people,” Bernie ranted in ’71.

That’s still his theme all those years later. The 1% owned too much. Everyone else owned too little. But now he’s a member of that 1% which “takes home 13.8% of all the income in Vermont.” And he isn’t about to voluntarily redistribute any of it.

As Bernie told attendees at a United Way event back in his days as Burlington’s top dog, “I don’t believe in charities.”

The only charity Bernie believes in is his own “social welfare” organization that his book is named after.

Read the rest: Sultan Knish: Bernie Sanders: Capitalist Pig