British Exit (Brexit) from EU - How Britain May Trigger A Political Earthquake


#1

***‘Brexit of Champions’: How Britain May Trigger A Political Earthquake***

In this wonderful article, Seth Lipsky quotes the American Spectator for the phrase Brexit of Champions (link). On June 23, 2016 Britain votes on Brexit. Hopefully Britain votes to leave.

Britain and the EU are truly a poor fit. The UK’s natural allies are its successful offspring, such countries as the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Israel and India. These countries have been successful, forward looking countries. The continental EU countries are in many respects frozen in time. They’re beautiful museum pieces but like their many churches largely bereft of worshipers, are places of the past, not the future. Britain joined the EU in 1973, at a time when the U.S. was crippled by the Vietnam War and its opposition, Watergate, price controls, inflation and the energy crisis.

Now the U.S. and other freedom-loving countries should be looking to the future, not to the mercantalist, bureaucratic past.


#2

However, the EU are its closest trading partners. There will be a price to pay for trading with the EU but not being a member, one Norway already pays.


#3

Britain was very smart to keep the Pound.


#4

[quote=“Alaska_Slim, post:2, topic:48341”]
However, the EU are its closest trading partners. There will be a price to pay for trading with the EU but not being a member, one Norway already pays.
[/quote]Norway, an oil producing country, has no need to subsidize socialist basket cases. And its exports, especially oil, will be bought by someone regardless of joining a faceless, feckless club in Brussels.

[quote=“Lord_Brennus, post:3, topic:48341”]
Britain was very smart to keep the Pound.
[/quote]Quite true. Why should it join the downward spiral?


#5

Thought so at the time and still think that way today.


#6

Great Britain is just a major mismatch for the EU. Historically Britain has always been at odds against mainland Europe. The culture of Britain is a stark contrast to the rest of Europe that seems to be stuck living in the glory of the past whereas GB is trying to move forward(and is making progress). As their cultural differences widen Britain will only drift further away from the EU.

Long live Britannia!:brit


#7

I think this should read “and was making progress.” Then of course they got hit with the tremendous influx of those who are of the muslim faith and the results are quite obvious, especially in London.


#8

[quote=“Seravee, post:6, topic:48341”]
Long live Britannia!:brit
[/quote]Is it bad that this reminds me of Code Geass?


#9

Emperor Lelouch vi Britannia would be proud.


#10

[quote=“JBG, post:1, topic:48341”]
***‘Brexit of Champions’: How Britain May Trigger A Political Earthquake***

In this wonderful article, Seth Lipsky quotes the American Spectator for the phrase Brexit of Champions (link). On June 23, 2016 Britain votes on Brexit. Hopefully Britain votes to leave.

Britain and the EU are truly a poor fit. The UK’s natural allies are its successful offspring, such countries as the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Israel and India. These countries have been successful, forward looking countries. The continental EU countries are in many respects frozen in time. They’re beautiful museum pieces but like their many churches largely bereft of worshipers, are places of the past, not the future. Britain joined the EU in 1973, at a time when the U.S. was crippled by the Vietnam War and its opposition, Watergate, price controls, inflation and the energy crisis.

Now the U.S. and other freedom-loving countries should be looking to the future, not to the mercantalist, bureaucratic past.
[/quote]Time to revive the thread. I defy anyone to show me an earlier thread on Brexit.

Brexit was a glorious event. The British people have worked their way, over the centuries, methodically, gradually and in an orderly manner to freedom. They were the progenitors of our free system. I do consider the U.S. to be an improvement over the British system but there is no question in my mind that we are them, they are us. When Princess Di died the media coverage here was overwhelming.

Britain on the other hand has nothing in common with the mercantalist, top-down systems prevailing in Continental Europe, which are really warmed over absolute monarchy, or maybe monarchy with advisory parliaments. Britain is different. It is an outward-looking, progressive country. The British people, as usual, are courageous and have spoken.