Brother of 8-year-old California girl arrested in her stabbing death


#1

(CNN) – Detectives on Saturday arrested the 12-year-old brother of Leila Fowler on a homicide charge in connection with his 8-year-old sister’s death, Calaveras County, California, Sheriff Gary Kuntz said.

The brother – who Kuntz did not name, but did speak publicly after his sister’s death – was arrested at 5:10 p.m. (8:10 p.m. ET) at a county sheriff’s office substation in his hometown of Valley Springs, according to the sheriff.

“Citizens of Calaveras County can sleep a little better tonight,” Kuntz said.

Leila Fowler and her brother were said to be alone on Saturday, April 27, in their family’s northern California home when she was found dead. The 12-year-old told police that he’d seen an intruder leaving the home, then found his sister suffering from stab wounds.

The 8-year-old died minutes after arriving at a hospital, authorities said.

Brother of 8-year-old California girl arrested in her stabbing death - CNN.com


#2

This is truly sick and sad.


#3

silli, please re-read RO’s Guide to Surviving RO, particularly the part about not posting entire articles. But do that after reducing your quote above by 75%-85%.

In regard to this story, I’m not sure whether “understanding” why this 12YO would do this to his sister would be helpful or sickening. And how could a justice system deal with a 12YO murderer? Obviously he won’t be going to San Quentin, but I think he may be released when he turns 18 or 21. Is that just?


#4

The court system has a history of breaking down into complete insanity with both perp and vicitm are minors. When both minors are within the same family, the level of insanity increases dramatically.

The outcome of this case could be anything from juvenile criminal psychiatric therapy into his mid-20s to a slap on the wrist that ends up vilifying the parents.


#5

It’s been 4 hours since I made my request, but silli hasn’t been on RO since last night. So I edited the quote in the OP.


#6

[quote=“PeteS_in_CA, post:5, topic:39438”]
It’s been 4 hours since I made my request, but silli hasn’t been on RO since last night. So I edited the quote in the OP.
[/quote]Pete

I am terribly sorry about the post.

I was away for Mothers Day and just returned.

(went to bed right after posting last night. This morning?)

Wont happen again.
SP


#7

I believe that when children commit adult crimes (esp. murder), they should be tried as adults. This story is exactly the point I’ve made on this forum–that the problem of our society here boils down to the lessening of the value of life. And, it has its roots in the abortion mentality. And, it is fed by the nihilism, relativism, and atheism found in public schools today. We reap what we sow.


#8

CT,

I really don’t know any details beyond what was posted in the OP. I heard on the radio today that both the mother and father are claiming that their son is innocent. I’ll let the evidence do the talking on this one.

I find it hard to punish a 12 year old as an adult. I say this even though I understand where you are coming from.


#9

Yeah.

I’m kind of with CL on this, CT. Not that we should go all warm and fuzzy and dismiss the kid’s responsibility for his actions, but as you noted, society has been setting the example. I don’t see the benefit of trying a 12-year-old as an adult, especially when society is prolonging the immaturity of adolescence well into what are supposed to be the adulthood years.


#10

I agree with you somewhat, FC. Some years ago, there was a 10 year old boy named Nathaniel (can’t remember his last name) who committed a heinous murder (I believe he murdered a younger boy)–and perhaps even more than one. I can’t remember where this occurred, but I THINK it was in Detroit. Anyway, when police checked his background, they discovered that this boy had been in so much trouble since he was 4 years old, spent time in a juvenile detention center a few times, and his offenses were so egregious in nature that they tried him as an adult. He was unrepentant. I’m not sure, but I think he got life in prison. Just recently, within the last couple of months, he was in the news again–sort of an update. Not much changed in him.

I believe that some children who commit adult crimes, such as Nathaniel, should be tried as adults. Most children are not hardened thugs and, as you noted, can be formed by their environment and society in general. But, there are many other children in the same situations who grow up to be law-abiding citizens and professionals. What I am for is treating the little gang-bangers like adult criminals. At some point, regardless of the source of their violent natures, we have to make them accountable for their actions. If we don’t, we create even more horrendous criminals in the long run.


#11

Odd. Because kids killed other kids back in the day too. Care for me to find examples?


#12

I am a firm believer in, “An eye for and eye”. Having said that I easily support the death penalty for anyone that can be proven without a doubt that they killed someone. In my eyes no one deserves to live if the have killed some one knowingly.


#13

So you support the death penalty for 2nd degree murder?


#14

Yep. If you beat the crap out of someone and it results in their death, why do you deserve to live? Now accidental deaths are different as that is not murder.


#15

We have made a clear distinction between premeditated murder and crimes of passion, no doubt murder deserves life in prison but I think its important what we decide is death penalty worthy


#16

BOP: I’m not denying that what you said is true! You don’t have to provide me with examples because I see it on the news and on the net everyday. I’m not sure what your point is, but to clarify mine, I believe that when kids commit heinous adult crimes (murder, rape, assault, etc.) they should be tried as adults. I also corrected my statement saying that not all children who commit adult crimes should be tried as adults. All the mitigating circumstances have to be taken into account, as in the case with the boy Nathaniel that I mentioned.

We seem to be fine in allowing children to have abortions and to purchase the PlanB abortion pill without parental knowledge or consent. But, when children commit heinous adult crimes suddenly we start wringing our hands and lamenting that they’re just children. There seems to be a chasm in how we perceive children in this country. When children have lengthy criminal records, juvenile detention sentences, drugs, absent parents, etc., this is an indication of a lifestyle pattern. If not caught and rendered neutral, these kids will go on to commit even worse crimes.


#17

I am sorry but if you take someones life whether it be premeditated or a crime of passion you have no right to live as you have taken that right from some else. Murder is murder.


#18

My point was that kids have killed each other throughout history and our current public school system and abortions are not to blame


#19

Then what is to blame?


#20

The point is not simply whether kids killed each other in times past - they did, duh-uh! - but whether to the same (or nearly so) degree. Putting it in practical terms, were one to compare 1989-2013 with a similar 25 year time period, 1948-1972, would a proportionate degree of killings and violence be found? 1972 being the year I graduated from high school, I can say,from experience and with some confidence, that the answer is, “No, not even close.” What changed? Unless you want to make the absurd claim that advertising, events, literature, and other entertainment media don’t influence people’s thinking and behavior, things like Roe v. Wade & abortion, disrupted families (a difference from the past of degree, not kind), movie violence, violence in music and violent video/computer games are part of the mix of answers to, “What changed?”