Calling all Grammar Majors

This is as trivial as you can get, so this looks like a good forum.

OK I don’t normally talk about spelling as I often misspell words myself.

However, I notice many people use “arguement” rather than “argument”.

Please enlighten me about this difference. I’m curious as hell. I just can’t stand it, I need to know. Please. Is there something I don’t know ???

Am I going crazy ??? Yes, I am. :howler:

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It is quite simple. “Arguement” is nothing more than a common misspelling of the word argument.

In my experience, gained from too many hours (years) participating in a number of forums, chats, etc., most reasonable people are quite forgiving of misspellings provided they can understand what the misspelled message is. Effective communication can and does occur despite misspellings and incorrect grammar. And this is where the experience comes in - as stated, most reasonable people will either let it pass without comment, or provide a constructive instruction regarding the misspelled word or correct grammar, but those who may be loosing an argument will often turn to attacking another poster for their spelling or grammar, as opposed to counter-attacking their argument. Unfortunately this is too common, and extremely lame.

While we can draw some conclusions about another based upon their written or oral communication skills, for instance - one can make judgments upon another’s education level, this is not a reliable means of judging another’s intelligence, ability to comprehend or to reason.

Just as I thought. What was freaking me out, was the number of people using that spelling. :eusa_think:
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You could always have asked our resident college student and spelling expert, logic. However, I heard he’s sick. Are you Ill logic ?.:tongue:

[quote=“Scorpius, post:2, topic:13430”]
It is quite simple. “Arguement” is nothing more than a common misspelling of the word argument.

In my experience, gained from too many hours (years) participating in a number of forums, chats, etc., most reasonable people are quite forgiving of misspellings provided they can understand what the misspelled message is. Effective communication can and does occur despite misspellings and incorrect grammar. And this is where the experience comes in - as stated, most reasonable people will either let it pass without comment, or provide a constructive instruction regarding the misspelled word or correct grammar, but those who may be loosing an argument will often turn to attacking another poster for their spelling or grammar, as opposed to counter-attacking their argument. Unfortunately this is too common, and extremely lame.

While we can draw some conclusions about another based upon their written or oral communication skills, for instance - one can make judgments upon another’s education level, this is not a reliable means of judging another’s intelligence, ability to comprehend or to reason.
[/quote]I was one of those who misspelled it until recently. Part of the problem is that there’s so damn little consistancy from word to word about what rules apply to spelling. The English language is a train wreck.

I have to agree with the statement about using spelling and grammar mistakes in attempting to discredit an opposing view…It just shows they have no game…

I wonder how many of my typos are due to sausagefingeritis?..:rofl:

I am guilty of that misspelling quite often I’m sure. When I write in Word, the spell check catches it all of the time. On forums, there usually is no spell check.

In a more formal document, one should proofread it for such errors. I agree about the attacking of ones grammar in a forum being the argument of the one that is losing or just being an anus.

:yeahthat:

I mean, unless it’s completely incoherent.

The English language, and the Amercian even more so, is very difficult to master. We have assimilated so many words from so many other languages and for nearly every rule there are exceptions which contribute greatly to the confusion. There is not even agreement amongst academics regarding style any longer.

Thus I maintain, provided you can convey your message to the recipient and they can effectively understand the message - then meaningful communication has occurred. In the end, this all that truly matters.

English actually began as a Germanic language via the Anglo-Saxons moving into southern Britan. Then there was the latin influence via the remnants of the Roman Empire and later the Roman Catholic Church that altered the word order to be more like latin. German languages tend to place verbs at the end of the phrase/sentence while latin doesn’t. Then there was the Norman invasion that established French to be the dominant European language. While French is a latin language, it is distinct. You can see much of this when you look at the entemologies of individual words.

This is why English is such a difficult language for others to learn. Not only has it borrowed many words from other languages, its actual rules have been altered into a mixture of rules from other languages.

I’m pretty sure there’s a rule that tells you why it should be “argument” and not “arguement.” But I can’t remember it. I guess I’ve just kinda memorized the spelling. A lot of other common spelling mistakes are “hypocracy” for “hypocrisy;” “definate” for “definite;” “dribble” for “drivel”; and the expression “tow” the line for “toe” the line. And sometimes I find myself seeing the mistakes so often that sometimes the correct spelling looks wrong.

Many good points all around.

[quote=“Bucks, post:1, topic:13430”]
This is as trivial as you can get, so this looks like a good forum.

OK I don’t normally talk about spelling as I often misspell words myself.

However, I notice many people use “arguement” rather than “argument”.

Please enlighten me about this difference. I’m curious as hell. I just can’t stand it, I need to know. Please. Is there something I don’t know ???

Am I going crazy ??? Yes, I am. :howler:

.
[/quote]Those who complain all the time about spelling are just being stupid. I have trouble spelling and I use the google spell checker and it does not catch all the words all the time.

Couple that with my normal ham handed typing it is a wonder I can spell my name. My wife, now my ex-wife, used to correct my spelling and it drove me nuts.

A friend of mine once told me that when her husband was in the military, his mother used to send his letters back to him with all the spelling/grammar errors marked.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v64/SusannaHarriff/Smilies/Thud-1.gif

[quote=“Scorpius, post:9, topic:13430”]
The English language, and the Amercian even more so, is very difficult to master. We have assimilated so many words from so many other languages and for nearly every rule there are exceptions which contribute greatly to the confusion. There is not even agreement amongst academics regarding style any longer.

Thus I maintain, provided you can convey your message to the recipient and they can effectively understand the message - then meaningful communication has occurred. In the end, this all that truly matters.
[/quote]"‘I’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c;’" except for the exceptions, which are legion…

The “consistency” :wink: is there. Two reasons things become misspelled imho is the influence of other languages, grammar and vocabulary, on our language as others have outlined here. Based on those other languages, the rules all make sense.

The second reason we see little consistency from word to word is because we have so many consistent misspellings floating around our enviroment, from business signs and advertisements to the informal writing and shorthand we use on the Internet. Those go unchecked, and words like “consistency” become “consistancy.”

I normally don’t correct someone’s spelling in settings like this. I assume first that it’s a typo or a brain fart (a technical term). But when a poster starts picking on spelling, I like to nitpick theirs; and I’m not trying to nitpick you with this either, FC.

The sign post on our road is misspelled - it says “cemetary” instead of “cemetery.”

There was once a local engine rebuilding business near me. The name of the business was “Master Built”. They had this posted on one side of the building, which was devoid of any real features save for the prominent and large letters spelling out Master Built. They did spell it right, however the “a” in the word “Master” was only hanging by a single bolt or something, so that it was essentially inverted, or upside down. Somehow, I guess they never saw the irony of a sign declaring Master Built, when the sign clearly wasn’t.

This brings up the amusing shift in proper grammar started by TV advertisers. I recall some ads taking liberties with our language in an effort to appeal to the “less educated” people, kinda like the elitist Obama trying to be a champion of the “middle class”.(clinging to guns and religion)

English professors immediately took offense saying TV would dumb down our communication skills. Well guess what, it did.

http://www.king5.com/lifestyles/stories/M_IMAGE.1185a805c34.93.88.fa.d0.1c63abf6.jpg

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Pop culture is awash in horrendous butchering of the language. There are numerous examples, a couple that quickly come to mind for me:

(1) “I can’t get no – satisfaction” - Double negative used by the Rolling Stones and considered a classic.
(2) “We Don’t Need No Education” - (Yes, you do) Double negative used by Pink Floyd
(3) “Space - the Final Frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: To explore strange new worlds. To seek out new life and new civilizations. To boldly go where no man has gone before.” - Split Infinitive used in the opening narration of the series Star Trek.
(4) “I wish I was special” Creep by Radio Head.
The more I think on the subject, the more of these I recall.