Can Our Electorate Be More Disconnected?


#1

The answer, of course, is no - our electorate could not be more obtuse!! Consider the following:

I was reading the other day that congress, as a group, has a 9% positive rating. In other words, fewer than one American in 10 views congress favorably. No surprise there.

Two days ago I read that those members of congress who run for reelection are successful 94% of the time.

Think about it. 91% of Americans think congress is fecal matter, yet these same Americans return the same fools to congress 94% of the time.

This represents a complete disconnect on the part of our electorate!! IMHO

I see no way to overcome this without a complete collapse with bread lines. Hope I’m wrong.


#2

I’m sorry, but they can and will be. Just wait for the house of cards that our economy is built on begins to collapse. When people start losing the freebies, they will blame everyone that has ever mentioned the words “budget cuts” not those that have spent us into oblivion.


#3

It’s been proven that voters care less about local elections than the general. It’s also been proven that less enthusiasm was in the recent 2012 election. While this may sound bad, it’s actually good for those in power. Obama is the master of ignoring scandals until they go away. Our YouTube brainwashing pot smoking society cannot remember where they were yesterday!


#4

A solution, raise the voting age to 30, 25 at least.


#5

Bread lines it is Mike. Gold, guns and Dinty Moore beef stew will be the new currency.


#6

MDMike:

91% of Americans think congress is fecal matter, yet these same Americans return the same fools to congress 94% of the time.

Know why? Same reason we can’t improve the public school system. Most people would agree that all the public schools are an abysmal failure…except theirs.


#7

I’d be happy for 21, and for teaching our kids to be adults instead of indefinite adolescents (no offense).


#8

[quote=“MDMikeB, post:1, topic:37753”]
The answer, of course, is no - our electorate could not be more obtuse!! Consider the following:

I was reading the other day that congress, as a group, has a 9% positive rating. In other words, fewer than one American in 10 views congress favorably. No surprise there.

Two days ago I read that those members of congress who run for reelection are successful 94% of the time.

Think about it. 91% of Americans think congress is fecal matter, yet these same Americans return the same fools to congress 94% of the time.

This represents a complete disconnect on the part of our electorate!! IMHO

I see no way to overcome this without a complete collapse with bread lines. Hope I’m wrong.
[/quote]Like most things, people view the problem in congress as “the other guy’s congressman.”


#9

Cam, we’ll know we have hit bottom when SPAM replaces Dinty Moore as our “coin of the realm”. 2Cent/Stang, you’re correct about people’s view that everyone else’s school or representative is substandard except theirs - all part of the disconnect.

Consider that most Americans think we have a critical problem regarding federal spending, debt and deficits. Yet they turn around and reelect a man who has helped to create the problem and who refuses to negotiate/discuss/address those issues.

I don’t know how you fix this level of stupidity without the most severe object lesson - eating Dinty Moore out of necessity.


#10

And, they may even be correct in holding that belief, while ignoring that their unwillingness to support fundamental change to education may well harm school districts less fortunate than their own, or that their own district has problems they are either unaware of or do not seem to affect their child.

Congress benefits from the fact that it is an irreplaceable institution. One may think what ever one does about it, while resting fully assured that there will be a congress next month, next year, and next decade. And the bar is set low for the congressional seat remaining in the hands of the incumbent, in convincing 51% of the electorate. Of more relevance is that congressmen are giving their constituents pretty much exactly what they want; benefits without the pesky requirement that they be paid for by their recipients.

Even people on the political right are not immune from believing two conflicting things at the same time, which is called cognitive dissonance in the head shrinking business, with many of them claiming to receive No benefits from the federal or state governments. The recent fiscal cliff crisis highlighted the naivete within that contention where it was revealed that milk prices might rise, double even, to $7/gallon in some markets. Most people don’t understand how we can subsidize a gallon of milk to the extent of the same price as what we pay for a gallon of milk. Similarly, they fail to see how that situation makes all milk drinkers welfare queens within a system they certainly did not choose.

The reason the same old-same old goes on is because of the same old-same old cognitive dissonance of an American public that thinks itself independent, relying on the government for nothing, and yet up to its eyeballs in government subsidized efforts they never consciously see. One does not become popular within ones community by going about pronouncing all farmers, big and small, welfare queens and the public their major enabler. Nor is it popular to observe that most government efforts, at least the ones enjoying the most popularity, are nothing more than trying to get something done…it doesn’t matter if the something is either necessary or desirable…by getting someone else to pay for it, in whole or in part. “Good local governance” is defined as one in which its management is adept at getting state funds for projects and services the citizens of the community would much rather not pay for given the choice.

We’re not becoming Europe; we are Europe. Nothing will change until the collapse occurs, hopefully soon.


#11

Excellent response, Sway - you certainly will get no argument from me. Well done!!


#12

Thanks, sort of…
Now, I’m depressed, which I get every time I consider that it is going to take a major economic earthquake to change things. My new position on the matter requires Boehnor and the House Republicans to do nothing. No programs, plans, budgets, bills, etc…designed for the good of the country. No votes, whether in bipartisan compromise or on principle alike, just…total abdication, voting “present”. Obama and the Dems won means to me; you broke it, you bought it. News today of a possible executive order from the president on gun control? Fine by me…have at it. Raise taxes? Have at it…raise 'em to the roof. Republicans should not vote for or against any of it. Call us in two years if it doesn’t work out for ya.

I’m siding with HL Mencken; Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard.


#13

I think it will first go to odd/even days with Spam and Dinty first… with some Hormel Corned beef hash & free range egg on Sundays!

Hey…when Costco is getting into the game…you know it ain’t too far fetched! Unbelievable… 30,144 Total Servings 4-people 1-year Emergency Food Kit by Shelf Reliance
"Apres moi…le deluge!"


#14

Sadly, I think you are correct, Sway. I posted nearly a month ago - while the “fiscal cliff” BS between Boehner and BO was in full swing - that Repubs should simply vote “present” in any and all votes taken on the issue. Let BO/Dems UNMISTAKENLY own the mess. I have not changed my view. That is what they should have done.


#15

Sharp marketers over at Costco. They have been known to be ahead of the curve!! I like the odd/even Spam and Dinty Moore idea. Free range eggs might get a bit scarce, though. Are you familiar the anthropological term, second harvest?


#16

“My congressman isn’t bad. It’s everyone else!”

Says everyone. I think that politics needs to be a lot more personal, and somehow a lot more honest. The disconnect between voters and who they elect is designed by using emotional ads and voting based on party.


#17

Not that I don’t get or disagreeing with your general statement, but do you know that dairy farmers/the free market does not set the cost of a gallon of milk; the gov’t does?

The reason the same old-same old goes on is because of the same old-same old cognitive dissonance of an American public that thinks itself independent, relying on the government for nothing, and yet up to its eyeballs in government subsidized efforts they never consciously see. One does not become popular within ones community by going about pronouncing all farmers, big and small, welfare queens and the public their major enabler. Nor is it popular to observe that most government efforts, at least the ones enjoying the most popularity, are nothing more than trying to get something done…it doesn’t matter if the something is either necessary or desirable…by getting someone else to pay for it, in whole or in part. “Good local governance” is defined as one in which its management is adept at getting state funds for projects and services the citizens of the community would much rather not pay for given the choice.

Brings to mind my husband’s best friend. Quite popular, I think. Sits at the coffee shop, and let’s the millionaire cow owners know just what he thinks about their cows getting food stamps. Quite the hoot, actually.

As far as your definition of what many find “good local governance,” I don’t, and I don’t think many here in our area see it that way. As a matter of fact, the mayor of the county’s seat is continually getting his butt chewed out for thinking we can live beyond our means.
Our district’s Representative, as far as I know, isn’t bringing bucks to the district; he’s a little busier trying to stop the spending. However, he isn’t held in near as high regard as Boozeman was. At least not in my eyes. (And annoys me by being so proud to send weekly updates, but not specifically how he voted; so then I have to go look it up; sometimes, but not always, to my dismay. We could do better.)

We’re not becoming Europe; we are Europe. Nothing will change until the collapse occurs, hopefully soon.

It’ll be gradual compared to Europe’s; too gradual for a major change for a long time, I’m afraid.


#18

Mike…re: Second Harvest…I do now! Gross!:redface: