Christians, Churches Dwindling in Iraq Since Start of War 10 Years Ago


#1

Christians,Churches Dwindling in Iraq Since Start of War 10 Years Ago

The head of the Chaldean Catholic Church in Iraq says that the number of Christian houses of worship there has dwindled alarmingly in the decade since the U.S. invaded and ousted Saddam Hussein from power.
There are just 57 Christian churches in the entire country, down from more than 300 as recently as 2003, Patriarch Louis Sako told Egyptian-based news agency **MidEast Christian News

. **The churches that remain are frequent targets of Islamic extremists, who have driven nearly a million Christians out of the land, say human rights advocates.

“The last 10 years have been the worst for Iraqi Christians because they bore witness to the biggest exodus and migration in the history of Iraq.”- William Warda, Hammurabi Human Rights Organization

“The last 10 years have been the worst for Iraqi Christians because they bore witness to the biggest exodus and migration in the history of Iraq,” William Warda, the head of the Hammurabi Human Rights Organization told the news agency.
Many Christians live in the provinces of Baghdad, Nineveh, and Kirkuk, and Dohuk and Erbil, which are both in the autonomous region of Kurdistan. Warda said some 1.4 million Christians lived in Iraq prior to Hussein’s ouster. Under the democratically-elected government that now oversees the war-torn, but oil-rich nation, Islamic extremists have been able to operate more freely.
“More than two-thirds [of Christians] have emigrated,” Warda noted.
One byproduct of regime change in the Middle East, whether at the hand of the U.S. military and its allies or demonstrators in the streets, has been a decline in tolerance for other religions, say experts. Only one Catholic church remains in Afghanistan, and it must be heavily protected. In Egypt and Libya, where demonstrators overthrew dictators in recent years, Christians have come under heavy persecution, say concerned advocates.

**READ MORE: ** Christians, churches dwindling in Iraq since start of war 10 years ago | Fox News

This is one of the big issues I have with our interventionist foreign policy. The interventionists and their supporters always point out the fact dictators like Saddam are gone and the government of that particular country is now a democracy so things are better. However, as it results often in empowering Sharia Law and the Muslim Brotherhood, and atrocities and persecution are even worse than before, it is another example showing our intervention was not a good idea. It has made things worse. I do not understand how people say it made things better.


#2

3rd world people who live under the Rule of dictators often must be ruled by the sword. They know no other way, and often don’t know how to handle their freedom when given the opportunity.
Saddam was a secular leader, and the people had more religious freedom under him than with their new true mob rule democracy. This is how democracy REALLY is. “Democracy is two million Islmaofascists, a jew and a few christians deciding who can worship, and the United States Government rigging the vote.”


#3

Just because a county has a vote, does not make it a Democracy.


#4

The government-sanctioned churches are disappearing. The underground church is probably still there. The government-sanctioned churches were required to keep their religion within the church building - no charities, no evangelism, no outward expression of their religion elsewhere. The underground church wasn’t bound by the government; therefore, I daresay it still exists.