Death Penalty


#1

I just read an article where Texas is poised to execute its 500th death row inmate, 52 year old Kimberly McCarthy tonight at 6:10 p.m. by lethal injection. Ms. McCarthy, a former cocaine addict, killed her 71 year old neighbor during a 1997 robbery. She was found guilty of using a butcher knife and a candelabra to beat and stab the retired college professor Dorothy Booth using the knife to sever Booth’s fingers to steal her wedding ring.

I have always been pro-death penalty. I am still pro-death penalty. I believe that the death penalty is not provided for a “deterrent” to crime, but, in fact, is JUSTICE for crime. I have also been criticized by many pro-lifers because they see a contradiction in being pro-death penalty yet pro-life regarding abortion. I stand by my convictions. Just wondering what everyone else thinks about the death penalty.

Are you pro or anti death penalty and why?


#2

I am anti-death penalty because I do not believe that teaching people that killing people is wrong by killing people is a particularly good way to go. Also, a lifetime in jail is a perfectly sufficient punishment/justice: you can take away someone’s life without killing them.


#3

[quote=“cynicaloptimist, post:2, topic:39948”]
I am anti-death penalty because I do not believe that teaching people that killing people is wrong by killing people is a particularly good way to go. Also, a lifetime in jail is a perfectly sufficient punishment/justice: you can take away someone’s life without killing them.
[/quote]Let the punishment fit the crime. The only way to absolutely insure murderers will not repeat the offense, is to execute them.
That said, I would only approve of the death penalty if the suspect clearly premeditated and planned the killing. Must be OBVIOUS.
INSANITY should not be allowed as a defense. If you are that insane, you do not need to be in society.


#4

Against, not in principle, but because as long as the probability of a wrongful conviction is not equal to exactly zero, which it will never be, people may be wrongly executed.

Plus it is more useful to put criminals to work so they can repay their debt to society rather than sit around using up more funds from public coffers and then die.


#5

My thoughts exactly.


#6

[quote=“Volk, post:4, topic:39948”]
Against, not in principle, but because as long as the probability of a wrongful conviction is not equal to exactly zero, which it will never be, people may be wrongly executed.

Plus it is more useful to put criminals to work so they can repay their debt to society rather than sit around using up more funds from public coffers and then die.
[/quote]Many US courts view that as slave labor.


#7

Anti-death penalty for 2 reasons:

  1. The court system isn’t perfect and accidentally executing an innocent person would be one of the greatest crimes, the possibility of the happening is small but existent.
  2. Even if the person is a horrible mass murderer, with 30 witnesses and camera evidence plus a journal detailing in advance how the killing is going to happen…than I’d say a long stint of rotting in a jail cell for 50 years is a far more fitting punishment than 20 years with a painless and public lethal injection.

Plus it’s surprisingly expensive to kill somebody!


#8

that is offset by the money it saves when you use “taking the death penalty off the table” as a plea bargaining chip


#9

Anti-death-penalty. I don’t think the government should have the power to kill its own citizens, especially when such punishments are irreversible and uncompensatable.


#10

Since 1989 there have been 309 post-conviction exoneration’s. 18 of these people served time on death row. Most of these innocent people were convicted on “eyewitness testimony” I have no doubt that the state has killed innocent people. There is strong evidence of this in a handful of cases. In a perfect system I support the death penalty but because of the possibility of an innocent man being put to death, I don’t agree with the death penalty.


#11

[quote=“Robert_Clay, post:7, topic:39948”]
Anti-death penalty for 2 reasons:

  1. The court system isn’t perfect and accidentally executing an innocent person would be one of the greatest crimes, the possibility of the happening is small but existent.
  2. Even if the person is a horrible mass murderer, with 30 witnesses and camera evidence plus a journal detailing in advance how the killing is going to happen…than I’d say a long stint of rotting in a jail cell for 50 years is a far more fitting punishment than 20 years with a painless and public lethal injection.

Plus it’s surprisingly expensive to kill somebody!
[/quote]Nope. Get a rope. Cheap. Easy. Complete.
ALL expense in the prison system is because of Gooberment bureaucracy and judicial red tape.
C’mon, man. Why pay professionals to administer a lethal injection, swab the site, and keep the record? Take 'em out, give 'em a hemp necktie, and say “bye bye”.


#12

The Thirteenth Amendment explicitly allows for it.


#13

[quote=“Lord_Brennus, post:12, topic:39948”]
The Thirteenth Amendment explicitly allows for it.
[/quote]Tell that to the courts. Some of them believe differently, and you should know that the courts wipe their John Brown hind parts with the Constitution.


#14

Case in point, Cameron Todd Willingham was likely wrongly executed. If you remember he was convicted of Arson and killing three children. After his execution his case was reviewed by nine of the nation’s top fire scientists Every one concluded that the original investigators relied on outdated theories to justify the conclusion that it was arson. The only other evidence of significance against Willingham was twice recanted testimony by another inmate who testified that Willingham had confessed to him.

A four-person panel of the Texas Forensic Science Commission investigating evidence of arson presented in the case acknowledged on July 23, 2010, that state and local arson investigators used “flawed science” in determining the blaze had been deliberately set. It also found insufficient evidence to prove that state Deputy Fire Marshal Manuel Vasquez and Corsicana Assistant Fire Chief Douglas Fogg were negligent or guilty of misconduct in their arson work
So no, I do not agree with the death penalty.


#15

I only support the death penalty in cases where guilt is not disputable. There is no doubt that Major Hassan killed those people in Fort Hood. He should die.
If you murder, and I support DP for rape also, and it is obvious you did it, you should be taken out of the gene pool.


#16

Eh, not saying some people don’t deserve it cough Saddam cough, just don’t want to be the one to make the decision. I think its the various appeals courts in addition to the special, high security death rows that eat up most taxpayer dollars.


#17

[quote=“Robert_Clay, post:16, topic:39948”]
Eh, not saying some people don’t deserve it cough Saddam cough, just don’t want to be the one to make the decision. I think its the various appeals courts in addition to the special, high security death rows that eat up most taxpayer dollars.
[/quote]The whole process is designed to fatigue everyone. It takes forever to arrest them, then forever to get them to arraignment, then forever to trial, then forever to sentence, then forever to appeal, appeal again, and then…
Get it over with. Justice is supposed to be swift.


#18

Most people who get off of death row because of evidence exonerating them do so after years of appeals, when evidence to clear their name is finally found. The point of the death penalty taking so long is to try and remove any chance of a mistake.

As for having the death penalty for “obvious” murderers, I don’t trust the government to decide what is and is not obvious guilt.


#19

[quote=“Trekky0623, post:18, topic:39948”]
Most people who get off of death row because of evidence exonerating them do so after years of appeals, when evidence to clear their name is finally found. The point of the death penalty taking so long is to try and remove any chance of a mistake.
[/quote]That is the point. There should be no question. If there is a question, Life without parole, and don’t make it a Country Club. Work 'em. Sheriff Joe Style.
You see, there must be an EXAMPLE made. Kids learn by example. If they see Gangstas getting wrist slappy sentences, they will think it OK to emulate that. However, if they see the hood bullies, dying at the hands of the State, they’ll be less apt to follow.
It really is a simple concept, complicated by those who make their living, off this.


#20

Well, like I said, I don’t trust the government to decide who is obviously guilty and who is not. I think everyone should be treated as if they might be innocent, despite how unlikely it may be.