DePaul Punishes Student for Exposing Vandals of Pro-Life Display


#1

DePaul Punishes Student for Exposing Vandals of Pro-Life Display

CHICAGO, February 28, 2013—DePaul University has punished a student for publicizing the names of fellow students who admitted to vandalizing his organization’s pro-life display. The student, Kristopher Del Campo, has been placed on probation after being found responsible for multiple conduct violations, including one that absurdly brands the publication of the names as “disorderly, violent, intimidating or dangerous.” The Foundation for Individual Rights In Education (FIRE) has intervened in his case.

“Kristopher Del Campo’s group was the victim of a politically motivated crime—and yet DePaul University is punishing Del Campo for naming the people who committed the crime,” said FIRE Senior Vice President Robert Shibley. “Unfortunately, this utter disregard for student rights has become par for the course at DePaul and too many other college campuses.”

With the investigation completed, DePaul Assistant Dean of Students Domonic Rollins provided Del Campo with a report from the Department of Public Safety, containing the names of 13 DePaul students who had admitted to vandalizing YAF’s display. On February 5, the national YAF organization posted this document on its website. On February 8, DePaul notified Del Campo that he was suspected of violating DePaul’s Code Of Student Responsibility—including a charge of “Disorderly, Violent, Intimidating or Dangerous Behavior,” which encompasses “creat[ing] a substantial risk of physical harm,” “causing significant emotional harm,” and “bullying.”

Seriously? In the real world criminal proceedings are open to the public. Some of the purposes are to discourage official caprice (disproportionate leniency or severity) and inform the public about past and possibly future threats. So what the Hades is DePaul doing shielding the perpetrators while punishing their victims?!


#2

Good is now bad and bad is now good.


#3

And as some wise guy said some 27 centuries ago: “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil”! Rather appropriate to this situation, in at least a couple of ways.