Disney gator attack: 2-year-old boy found dead


#1

It’s not politics but I thought that some here would like to know?

I am feeling pretty low right now.

The 2-year-old boy who witnesses said was pulled by an alligator into a lagoon near a Walt Disney World hotel has been found dead by the Orange County dive team, Sheriff Jerry Demings said at a Wednesday news conference.The body of the boy, Lane Graves, was found intact about 1:45 p.m., not far from where the boy was grabbed Tuesday night, Demings said.
He likely drowned, Demings said.
“Of course, the autopsy has to confirm that, but there is likely no question in my mind that the child was drowned by the alligator,” Demings said.
Demings said the body was found in murky water perhaps 10 to 15 yards from where the boy was attacked.

Disney gator attack: 2-year-old Nebraska boy found dead - CNN.com


#2

I was born and raised in Fort Lauderdale.

Had a rockpit behind our home that we use to swim in.

We all knew of the gator that lived there but we also knew that a gator wont usually attack an object (or person) that is larger than a small animal.

We use to dive into the water, even when the gator was lazing on the bank, right next to where we were swimming.

It would either ignore us or swim away.
(Lots of neighbors dogs went missing though)

Disney hires experts to come in and remove what gators may be in the waters.

Gators migrate all the time and it’s nearly impossible to deter them.

I’ve seen gators climb chain link fences to get to a backyard pool.

Heck, though they prefer fresh water, we had a few on Lauderdale beach (salt water) years ago.


#3

Do they have television in Nebraska. Was the mother with the father and the child. IF she wasn’t, I can see how this would happen. A MOTHER doesn’t take chances. She wouldn’t allow the child to play in water, lagoon water, She would have noticed the sign. A MOTHER would not take a chance doing something that would even remotely morph into something else involving ACCIDENT. life threatening. DEADLY. accident.

FOr instance…a father and mother are at a large petting zoo with medium sized mammals FENCED IN. THe dad says to the attendant…can I put my kid in this pen for a couple photos. THE MOTHER meanwhile is screaming…"ARE YOU CRAZY?? YOU ARE NOT Putting ouR CHILD IN ANY PEN EVEN WITH FLUFFY BUNNIES. THERE"S A FENCE>…FENCES MEAN SOMETHING.

see. there’s a difference. Some people do not think ahead at what might potentially happen. with children. Now if you wish to climb in a gorilla enclosure, be my guest…but you don’t put my child into an enclosure with animals, I don’t care how domesticated you think they are.

Wait for the suit. It’s coming.


#4

#5

Concealed carry would have been one solution to the problem!


#6

Disney is pretty leftist, though; they might not have allowed it on their property.


#7

In my opinion:
Ultimate fault is with the property owner. It’s your property, if you have dangerous animals on it, get rid of them.

Also, the state is partly to blame. Florida and Louisiana both have high populations of alligators. Florida has many more alligator attacks though, and I believe part of the problem is that the process of getting a permit to hunt is a serious jumping though hoops situation. In Louisiana, it’s not really that much easier to hunt them, but in general, if you kill a gator on your property you probably won’t have Johnny Law taking you away afterwards. “I was walking along, and it jumped at me. I shot it.”

Also in Florida the population is much more immigrant heavy. I mean Northern immigrants. Yankees.
They don’t grow up around alligators.

Everybody thinks they’re going to Disney! It’s the most kid friendly place in the world!
It’s also in the middle of a heavy alligator population center, so keep your kids and pets away from the water.

Lastly, I just want to say that I truly feel horrible for that family. I can’t imagine the grief they are going through. I can’t say something like “well, I hope they learned their lesson!” That’s not a lesson that needs teaching. I hope that other people learn from their tragedy though.


#8

The first thing I thought of when I viewed the aerial photos of the lake, hotel and surrounding area was, "My God, Disney built an INVITING sandy beach right to the water’s edge of this gator-infested, man-made lake that has been described as a “Jurassic Park” after dark due to the number of alligators that enter the lake. Such a beach literally invited the kind of activity this family was engaged in when the boy was taken.

Frankly, I’m stunned this is the first time a child has been taken by an alligator

Visitors from all over the world visit that hotel - most of them don’t know squat about alligators. Because it’s Disney, they (visitors) no doubt assume it’s safe. It is my understanding that what signage exists simply cautions about going into the water without explanation as to why. However, even with proper signage, there is no way in hell Disney could expect that public exposure to close proximity to such a danger wouldn’t lead to such a tragic event

Disney had best check their bank account balance.


#9

I lived in Davie for 11 years taking care of my mom, aunt and grandparents. The idiots in the endangered species gang decided to put the American Alligator on the list back in the 70’s, I believe. Native Floridians hunted gators for their meat and skin. Now, after this decision, they can’t do that anymore. What happens? Anyone with a lick of sense knows: the American Alligator population exploded into the millions. Now, Florida has millions of miles of natural and man-made canals. Guess where Alligators hunt and live? That’s why they’re found in swimming pools, backyards, garages, and even homes. So now, what do the morons in the ES gang do? They give limited time for hunters to do what they used to do that kept the population of alligators at a reasonable level. Idiots.

BTW, I hated living in FL. It was too hot, for too long (from april until November 92+degrees & very high humidity) and it was like a steam bath every time you stepped out. The sun can literally destroy a car’s interior. That’s why a lot of Floridians cover their dashboards with stuff. The traffic is unbelievable and there is no real public transportation available. Why any normal human being would want to live there is beyond me. After my mom, aunt, and grandmother died, I took my grandfather back to Chicago. He died 6 months after that. He loved Florida.

The only positive thing about Florida was teaching in South Florida with Cubans. I loved it! I love the Cuban people. They are the nicest people in Florida. It was the hard work of the Cuban people who made Miami what it is.


#10

Ahh, no. The family was out there doing something they should not have been doing at 9PM, which is after dark. They were knee deep in water in a place that was clearly market, “no swimming.” They broke the rules. You have to shoot a gater in head in your going to stop it. Otherwise it is quite prone to get nasty when wounded. It’s hard to shoot a gater in the head in the dark.

Disney should have had signs up about the possibility of gaters and snakes. Wherever there is fresh water in Florida, there will probably be gaters. It’s impossilbe to stop them from migrating. I have lived in Florida for the last 13 years, and they are in the bodies of water that are near my home. As long as you leave them alone, and NEVER FEED THEM, there are almost never any problems.


#11

I lived in Florida for 11 years–hated it. But, it is exactly as you point out re gators. They are a menace and it’s not true that if you leave them alone you will avoid problems. Alligators are found many times in swimming pools, backyards, garages, car ports, private ponds, etc. They are nasty creatures and even nastier when professionals try to get them out of your pool or backyard.


#12

Constructing an inviting, man-made sandy beach right to the waters edge in no way suggested mortal danger. Likewise, signage void of a reference to the presence of alligators did nothing to suggest the presence of mortal danger. Did this family break the posted rule of “no swimming/wading”? Yes. Would they have gone near the water if the presence of alligators been posted? We don’t know, but I think it unlikely. Without such a posting this child was a sitting duck in a location KNOWN by some to be dangerous; often referred to by Disney employees as an after-dark “Jurassic Park” (their words, not mine).

People from locales all over the US and the world visit this theme park. I would guess many, maybe most, of these people are unaware that alligators are even present within the Disney facility. After all, it’s Disneyland - the last place on earth most people would expect to face the kind of death experienced by this child.

Under the circumstances, I’m amazed by three things: First, I’m amazed that Disney would construct a beach to the water’s edge of an after-dark alligator pit. Second, I’m amazed Disney would do this and NOT place signs explicitly noting the specific danger/presence of alligators. And third, given items 1 and 2 I’m amazed what happened to this little boy hasn’t happened before.


#13

First, I’m amazed that Disney would construct a beach to the water’s edge of an after-dark alligator pit.

Back in the '80 and '90 you could sun and swim on those beaches that were in front of those resorts. I have been there and done that when it was permitted. Disney shut them down for swimming circa 2000. I thought that it was because of bacteria, but I should also thought of the alligators.

Believe or not Disney has a whole group of houses on stilts over the water that are in front of Polynesian Resort. I could see some guy, who was “in his cups,” falling in some night and becoming food for the local wildlife.