Doctor Refuses to Accept Insurance, Cuts Prices in Half


#1

After looking at his prices, I am shocked that there is mountain of paperwork for the HMO’s and insurance companies. I see no reason why most people cannot pay these prices out of pocket. Insurance should only be needed for the big or catastrophic expenses like cancer or a major auto accident.

South Portland doctor stops accepting insurance, posts prices online — Portland — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

http://www.ciampifamilypractice.com/Our_Prices.html


#2

Good for him. Too bad that these prices aren’t the norm. Ten years ago I was in the hospital for a month for major surgery and recovery(I have Crohns disease) Without my medical insurance I would lost everything. The final bill was over 600 G’s The itemized breakdown was straight up robbery. $250.00 for one dosage of tylenol.


#3

Good for him I guess? I’d probably just go to another doctor, not a big deal either way…
Though the house calls thing could be kind of nifty.


#4

You’re shocked at the paperwork? Or were you being facetious? (The paperwork is what has most of 'em pulling their hair out. They HATE it; and w/good reason.)

Anyway, I haven’t been to Bangor in over 30 years. This guy makes it tempting to repay a visit one day.

More and more doctors are getting on this bandwagon, (or similar remedies), and Dr. Ciampi is right - that’s the only true health care reform/improvements being made.
Kudos to him.


#5

Sounds like a great idea. All of these costs are ones that folks can budget and pay for, just like changing the oil in a car. No one buys auto insurance to address routine maintanance, but only for more catastrophic and unpredictable costs. A similar model for health insurance (catastrophic coverage, linked with health savings accounts to permit tax-advantaged reimbursement of the routine stuff) is the true road ahead.

I have to laugh (to keep from crying) from the latest response of many smaller employers to ObamaCare. Rather than paying for the soup to nuts coverage that Obama was counting on, instead they are offering bare-bones plans that cover routine preventive care at no cost and don’t cover hospital stays at all. That’s like buying auto insurance to pay for Jiffy Lube and going uninsured for major accidents. Crazy, just crazy.


#6

Hm, my doctor’s fees are about the same as his, and he does accept insurance - including medicare. As far as I know, though, he doesn’t do the “extras” - but I do know that under certain conditions, he may make a house call. He mentioned a call to a dying man to me - because the man happened to live near me, and he had asked me about where I lived.


#7

I work in health care and would love to work in a cash only clinic. It would mean the patient would always come first and they would only get as much care as they want. The relationship between patient and clinician is harmed when their is a third payer. It switches the motives. The patient wants to get as much labs, tests, imagining as they can get because they have already paid and the doctor tries to get as much money from the insurance. Which drives up pricies.

With cash only, everything will be a discussion of what the patient will pay and what is needed.


#8

Yeah, gee, go figure. Supply and demand. Who’d a’thunk?