Educating on tuition costs and options/college reform


#1

Newt Gingrich made an excellent and unpopular point when he was running for president and in the debates when talking about that college in the ozarks how kids just go to college to study and work while studying and their work pays for their tuition, books and food 100%. No time to screw around and get thousands or tens of thousands in debt. When you leave you are debt free, and have a degree.

I believe 100% that there should be a law passed in every state that forces every student in their senior year of High School to take a finance basics class. How to record charges, how interest works, difference between different student loans and how it can affect you, Different outcomes based on if you decide to work and go to school or just go to school, how taking some classes at a 2 year college can severely reduce your tuition costs. How credit works etc…

College students and upcoming college students need to be educated on how their choices while attending school can effect their financial future and create mountains of unneeded stress for years to come. The caution signs need to be lit up ASAP.

I know there are tons of topics on this site on how the education system in the US is failing our generations, but what’s worse is how the lack of understanding on finances is destroying our country. It’s all about what can I buy next, instead of can I truly afford this or should I wait and save more money then come back to this. Or do I really need this or should I put the money towards another months rent to get ahead or should I invest this and get even more money back as a return on investment? In this technology world we live in there is an unlimited amount of wants that people will have at all times, but what are the consequences should I buy this? People can’t find this stuff out, because they aren’t educated enough to be able to find this stuff out. This is an epidemic that needs to be corrected.

What are your thoughts, guys and gals?


#2

You’re advocating for a class to teach common sense, essentially. Is that where our country is? This is coming from a junior-ish in college


#3

[quote=“BullsOnParade, post:2, topic:39570”]
You’re advocating for a class to teach common sense, essentially. Is that where our country is? This is coming from a junior-ish in college
[/quote]Well, since so much of our society is devoid of Common Sense, opting rather for logic or ignorance, maybe teaching Common Sense is a good idea.


#4

I think logic and common sense are the same thing


#5

[quote=“BullsOnParade, post:4, topic:39570”]
I think logic and common sense are the same thing
[/quote]So did Mr Spock.


#6

I cannot possibly agree more on the thing about the finance class for senior high school students, everyone going to college should take it…I had a few good post-high school trial and error years trying to keep my credit score above 700. 2-year school is also something I’d recommend, same classes, you can transfer them, fraction of the cost, AND four year colleges are far more likely to accept someone transfering from a 2-year as opposed to a high school student…plus for the young naive 19 year old who decides to spend a couple semesters lazing around a waste of $700 is far less than a waste of $7,000. Now I’m not sure the College of the Ozarks solution will work every place, I looked up work-colleges and they seem to be the exception rather than the rule, plus they tend to be smaller school due to cost, still it’s not a bad idea on paper and working off at least some of the ridiculously high tuition costs seems like a doable plan.


#7

Logic is logic. Common sense is more like intuition. Logic is often garbage in, garbage out. Common sense is more like: “What’s wrong with this picture?”


#8

Alright I guess.


#9

yeah, in my high school that I went to 10 years ago, they had an accounting class that 10th graders and up could take, but that was more business accounting and writing checks. Agree completely on 2 year community colleges and cost offsetting. The school in the ozarks is a good base model/template to build on. Lot’s of big colleges need student employees as well.

For those that think this stuff is common sense. It’s really not. Many seniors in high school don’t know how credit works, and how not paying the monthly payment when you get your first credit card or line of credit will greatly affect your credit score and prevent you from getting that good interest rate on a future student loan, or prevent you from qualifying for a car that might be in dire need of one day. What credit score do you generally need to get approved for a loan or credit card? What is the debt to income ratio? and how will it affect my borrowing ability?

Many student might know how to calculate interest rates and learn that in high school, but some may not know how to calculate total interest on the entire life of the loan at 5% Vs 10%. Absolutely this need to be a mandatory class for all high school seniors.


#10

School of the Ozarks, now, COLLEGE of the Ozarks, is near and dear to my heart! Their motto is, "Hard Work U."
And yes, the student is debt free upon graduation. They center most of its curriculum on an agricultural degree. The students raise the crops and livestock…that is served in the restaurant who are learning/earning a catering degree work. They can also obtain a teaching degree, where the students earning such work in the daycare center to work off their debt.
Not only are these students paying off their debt as they work, they are getting hands-on experience that give them hands above the rest when entering the work force over those who only get 'book knowledge.'
And guess WHAT!!! (Meant to bring this up ever so long ago.) Next year, they are opening their first HIGH SCHOOL!!! This school will be SOAKED entirely in technological training. It’s amazing! Small to start, so it’s lottery for your kids to get in, but they do their level best, if there are siblings, to go with that. Ahh, what I wouldn’t have GIVEN for my kids to attend!

I believe 100% that there should be a law passed in every state that forces every student in their senior year of High School to take a finance basics class. How to record charges, how interest works, difference between different student loans and how it can affect you, Different outcomes based on if you decide to work and go to school or just go to school, how taking some classes at a 2 year college can severely reduce your tuition costs. How credit works etc.

Not that I disagree, but this used to be a requirement for 10th grade students. Back in 1850, no 8th grade student graduated without a solid foundation in basic finances.
So, while I agree with you, this needs to be implemented a tad earlier than 12th grade.

College students and upcoming college students need to be educated on how their choices while attending school can effect their financial future and create mountains of unneeded stress for years to come. The caution signs need to be lit up ASAP.

I know there are tons of topics on this site on how the education system in the US is failing our generations, but what’s worse is how the lack of understanding on finances is destroying our country. It’s all about what can I buy next, instead of can I truly afford this or should I wait and save more money then come back to this. Or do I really need this or should I put the money towards another months rent to get ahead or should I invest this and get even more money back as a return on investment? In this technology world we live in there is an unlimited amount of wants that people will have at all times, but what are the consequences should I buy this? People can’t find this stuff out, because they aren’t educated enough to be able to find this stuff out. This is an epidemic that needs to be corrected.

What are your thoughts, guys and gals?

Won’t get any argument out of me over that.
“The Dummying Down of America” didn’t happen by accident. I’ll advocate anything that attempts to correct it.

I might not be popular for stating so, but much of this is a result of the feminist movement when women decided they could do it all. Or were convinced by mal-nourished brains who attested to it.
NO, you CAN’T!
I’ve nothing against women having a career, but not at the expense of spending money on your children rather than the time it takes to raise them. All it did was create an entire generation of kids who were given things, who, well knock me down and call and call me ‘shorty’ - expected, "total, instant gratification’ whether their parent were there to provide it or not.


#11

2cent,

Thank you for your kind words and for sharing your knowledge about College of the Ozarks. If you have any links or other knowledge on it please share it in this thread. Good point about teaching basic finances beginning in 10th grade instead of 12th grade. This thread was made for us to share some ideas on how to best educate high school and college students on finances and how there choices can affect there future in big ways. Also, if anybody has ideas or insight on why college debt is so high and how to make it much lower this thread could use it. If there are other college examples like the one in the Ozarks or one that help keep student debt limited, I encourage you to share.


#12

Here is a link to C of O College. College of the Ozarks
Something that troubles me. If you go to the right hand links they contradict themselves when it come to accepting no fed grants, and not.
I’m surmising that some students obtain grants on their own, but the School, itself, does not recommend, nor endorse them. Not sure.

Btw, it is a requirement to attend church on Sunday. I believe it is Baptist in its general theme, but if you don’t go, (at least it was so 20 yrs ago, you don’t graduate. It is required. However, they don’t require you to become a Baptist; just to attend. At least that is how I understood it.)

Another college of higher learning I’d HIGHLY recommend is Hillsdale College. They’re first and foremost pledge is to make sure NO student graduates without a solid, fundamental knowledge of the U.S. Constitution. Lawzy, had I known about that college when my daughter went to looking, she wouldn’t have had much of a choice.

As it is, she graduated from NASCAR in Charlotte. What can I say?


#13

Governors, Congressmen, and the President could learn from Governor Nathan Deal of Georgia. He saved the HOPE scholarship program by CUTTING SPENDING. The same principle should be followed on the Federal level. If the federal government would make responsible cuts, Social Security and Medicare may survive to the next generation. However, there is little hope due to politicians not understanding the value of a balance budget. Great Job Nathan Deal! I hope you get reelected in 2014!


#14

*Responsible *cuts, now there’s the rub…

@Stephen: Also I can’t seem to find your introduction thread, so hello.


#15

He posted it is somebody else’s.


#16

He C&Ped and put it in his own intro thread now.


#17

That I did! Sorry for the confusion.