Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood (subtitled)


#1

I thought I would share this in light of the Syria conflict. It appears to me that the U.S. is more concerned with removing Assad (a secular dictator) and slighting Russia than destroying ISIS. Many U.S. arms have fallen into the hands of ISIS. The official U.S. position, of course, is that the intention was to place them in the hands of the moderate rebels (which have in turn funneled them to al-Nusra, or Al Qaeda in Syria…oh yeah, another enemy we are on the same side of).

Anyway, the video is quite interesting. President Nasser jokes with the crowd about a Muslim Brotherhood proposal to force women to wear the hijab. I am sure he could never imagine that one day the Muslim Brotherhood would control his country, all because of democracy of course.

The lesson of the Middle East is that they will not have political institutions forced on them. Democracy has failed in Eypgt and Libya. The Arab Spring failed. It simply won’t take hold in Iraq and Afghanistan, where we have spent great effort to make it work.

Iran organically came to adopt democracy, but the U.S. put that to an end by installing a monarchy, which the people rebelled against and replaced with a theocracy.

We should stay out of the Middle East, only getting involved when we face a threat (such as ISIS, or Al Qaeda, or Iran’s aggressive nuclear intentions), kill them, or otherwise deal with it, and get out.

On this larger point of secular dictatorships vs. democracy, I was pleased to read yesterday that Benjamin Netanyahu agrees with me. In September, Vladimir Putin made similar comments.

Unfortunately, I am sure the U.S. will be the last to “get it.”


#2

If I may ask, why would you say that? It may have been that way at first, but I believe it’s quite different now.

The “rebels” we were training were being specifically told “ignore Assad, go after ISIS”, and the Kurds we’re arming are fighting ISIS nigh-exclusively. Same to the Iraqi army.

The lesson of the Middle East is that they will not have political institutions forced on them. Democracy has failed in Eypgt and Libya. The Arab Spring failed. It simply won’t take hold in Iraq and Afghanistan, where we have spent great effort to make it work.

I agree. Singapore was similiar, which is why the man in charge there didn’t bother with it, instead opting for economic Freedom only.

Chile took a similiar approach, and once economic prosperity took root, it eventually allowed for a more learned people to emerge who could both demand & handle democracy. It’s probably the best course for these nations to follow, far better than us thinking we remake all of them like S. Korea.


#3

No, the rebels were definitely trained and armed to fight Assad. That is who they were rebelling against. We are giving lip service to the Kurds. And if we were serious, we would force Baghdad to allow the Kurds to sell their oil. We would also use our power to put a halt to the Turkish airstrikes against the Kurds.