End of Columbus Day is the End of America


#1

This piece by Daniel ranks among his best and most thought provoking and perhaps one that foretells our near future. I am afraid that in my lifetime (I am in my 70’s) I will see this come to pass. The juggernaut of the far left will not be denied and more than stage 4 cancer. We are at best a dying patient. I suggest all save Daniel’s writings as the day may not be so far off that he and others of his ilk will be banned and burned…

The End of Columbus Day is the End of America

Posted by Daniel Greenfield 5 Comments

Columbus may have outfoxed the Spanish court and his rivals, but he is falling victim to the court of political correctness. The explorer who discovered America has become controversial because the very idea of America has become controversial.

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There are counter-historical claims put forward by Muslim and Chinese scholars claiming that they discovered America first. And there are mobs of fake indigenous activists on every campus to whom the old Italian is as much of a villain as the bearded Uncle Sam.

Columbus Day parades are met with protests and some have been minimized or eliminated.

In a number of cities Columbus Day was transformed into Indigenous People’s Day, which sounds like a Marxist terrorist group’s holiday.

After making a shambles of his efforts at socialized medicine, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin signed on to Indigenous People’s Day. What began in Berkeley, spread to Denver, Pheonix and Seattle, among other cities.

No American state has followed Venezuela’s lead in renaming it Día de la Resistencia Indígena, or Day of Indigenous Resistance, which actually is a Marxist terrorist group’s holiday, but the whole notion of celebrating the discovery of America has come to be seen as somehow shameful and worst of all, politically incorrect.

The shift from celebrating Columbus’ arrival in America to commemorating it as an American tragedy by focusing on the tribes who had settled there earlier, rather than the American settlers, is a profound form of historical revisionism that hacks away at the origins of this country.

The attacks on Columbus Day have less to do with the distant descendants of those tribes, most of whom owe more of their ancestry to the later arrivals made possible by Columbus, than with the agenda of the left.

Anti-Columbus Day protests are mounted by La Raza, whose members, despite their indigenous posturing, are actually mostly descended from Spanish colonists, but who know that most Americans are too confused to rationally frame an objection to a protest by any minority group.

The absurdity is deepened by the linguistic and cultural ties between the Italian Columbus Day marchers and the Latino Anti-Columbus Day protesters with the latter set cynically exploiting white guilt to pretend that being the descendants of Southern European colonists makes them a minority.

If being descended from Southern Europeans makes you a minority, then Columbus, the parade marchers, the Greek restaurant owner nearby and even Rush Limbaugh are all “people of color.”

Italian-Americans are the only bulwark against political correctness still keeping Columbus on the calendar, and that has made mayors and governors in cities and states with large Italian-American communities wary of tossing the great explorer completely overboard. But while Ferdinand and Isabella may have brought Columbus back in chains, modern day political correctness is erasing him from history and replacing him with a note reading, “I’m Sorry We Ever Landed Here.”

But this is about more than one single 15th century Genoan with a complicated life who was neither a monster nor a saint. It is about whether America really has any right to exist at all. Is there any argument against celebrating Columbus Day, that cannot similarly be applied to the Fourth of July?

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If Columbus is to be stricken from the history books in favor of ideological thugs like Malcolm X or Caesar Chavez, then America must soon follow. Columbus’ crime is that he enabled European settlement of the continent.

If the settlement of non-Indians in North America is illegitimate, then any national state they created is also illegitimate.

It is easier to hack away at a nation’s history by beginning with the lower branches.

Columbus is an easier target than America itself, though the left considers both colonialist vermin. Americans are less likely to protest over the banishment of Columbus to the politically correct gulag than over the banishing America itself, which was named after another one of those colonialist explorers, Amerigo Vespucci. First they came for Columbus Day and then for the Fourth of July.

The battles being fought over Columbus Day foreshadow the battles to be fought over the Fourth of July. As Columbus Day joins the list of banned holidays in more cities, one day there may not be a Fourth of July, just a day of Native Resistance to remember the atrocities of the colonists with PBS documentaries comparing George Washington to Hitler.

These documentaries already exist, they just haven’t gone mainstream. Yet.

We celebrate Columbus Day and the Fourth of July because that is our history. Had the Aztecs, the Mayans or the Iroquois Confederation developed the necessary technology and skills to cross the Atlantic and begin colonizing Europe, the fate of its native inhabitants would have been far uglier. The different perspectives on history often depend on which side you happen to be on.

To Americans, the Alamo is a shining moment of heroism. To the Mexicans who are the heirs of a colonialist empire far more ruthless than anything to be found north of the Rio Grande, the war was a plot to conquer Mexican territory. And neither side is altogether wrong, but choosing which version of history to go by is the difference between being an American or a Mexican.

A nation’s mythology, its paragons and heroes, its founding legends and great deeds, are its soul. To replace them with another culture’s perspective on its history is to kill that soul.

That is the ultimate goal of political correctness, to kill America’s soul. To stick George Washington, Patrick Henry, Jefferson, James Bowie, Paul Revere, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and all the rest on a shelf in a back room somewhere, and replace them with timelier liberal heroes. Move over Washington, Caesar Chavez needs this space. No more American heroes need apply.

Followed of course by no more America.

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This is how it begins. And that is how it ends. Nations are not destroyed by atomic bombs or economic catastrophes; they are lost when they lose any reason to go on living. When they no longer have enough pride to go on fighting to survive.

The final note of politically correct lunacy comes from a headline in the Columbus Dispatch about the Columbus Day festival in the city of Columbus, Ohio. “Italian Festival honors controversial explorer with its own Columbus Day parade”.

Once the great discover of America, Columbus is now dubbed “controversial” by a newspaper named after him, in a city named after him .And if he is controversial, how can naming a city after him and a newspaper after the city not be equally controversial?

Can the day when USA Today has a headline reading, “Some cities still plan controversial 4th of July celebration of American independence” be far behind?


#2

Relax.

Our economy will collapse long before. Fact is, it probably won’t make it through Year 1 of the Age of the Hag.


#3

I’m sorry, but no. Attacking the Founders is one thing; this is quite different.

Columbus was outright rejected by Americans a little over a century and a half ago, just like how Cinco de Mayo wasn’t celebrated anywhere in the 1950s. Rather, he was celebrated by newly arrived Italian-immigrants who wanted a day to commemorate their ethnic-identity. Eventually, cultural osmosis happened, and we all started to celebrate it. Just like we do St. Patrick’s day.

Trouble is, Columbus was an Arse hole.

He was a crook to his crew, taking the credit for discoveries they made for himself

He was a rapist and a slaver to the natives he encountered in the indies.

He strip-mined the islands for Gold, cutting off the hands of natives who couldn’t find any. In the Caribbean, where gold is scarce.

The Arawaks, the main tribe Columbus had maintained contact with for so long in the indies, committed mass suicide to escape the brutality of the Spanish.

250,000 people. Gone. In just over 60 years. The Arawaks no longer exist thanks to this.

> The attacks on Columbus Day

Are justified.

He was a vein, evil man, who was terrible to all who knew him.

He was not an innovator, he did not discover America, and he thought the world was Pear-shaped. Insisting anyone who failed to agree with him was an idiot.

No, I’ am all for letting this guy go. ***Do it. *** He doesn’t deserve celebration, he deserves Damnatio memoriae.


#4

Just exactly where are you getting this?


#5

> He was a vein, evil man, who was terrible to all who knew him.

> He was not an innovator, he did not discover America, and he thought the world was Pear-shaped. Insisting anyone who failed to agree with him was an idiot.

Bigoted, left wing statements like this make me tired.

Perhaps if you read a book or two about Columbus and knew something about the man, you would have a more objective view. You should also read some books about how people acted during the days of Columbus.

If you want a modern example, check out the way the radical Moslems treat people with their burnings in cages and beheadings. That’s the way Europeans treated people in Columbus’ day. Mary I of England, who ruled in the mid 1500s after Columbus’ voyages to America, had almost 300 people burned at the stake because of their religious beliefs. Her father, Henry VIII, had his wives beheaded instead of divorcing them.

Columbus was an innovator, and great seaman. He set out in uncharted territory to find a land which was located somewhere at an indefinite distance with no charts and no maps. He arrived there and was able to return home. He was a master of the concept of “dead reckoning.” He had an amazing sense of direction.

He re-discovered the Americas for the European people which resulted in both good and bad results. Somebody had to re-discover the American continents. and no matter who that somebody was, it probably would not have pleased you.

And for the record, one could have hardly called Leif Ericson and Vikings, the first discoverers of America, “civilized.” Just ask the English during the many time times the Vikings invaded England during which they burned, pillaged and plundered. People feared and hated the Vikings.

But keep on with the far left wing clap-trap authored by people who only study history when it makes Caucasians look bad. All races have committed atrocities. That is the simple, honest truth.


#6

We all have veins so what is your point?


#7

I read thru your diatribe and sorry but had to laugh. You completely missed the point of the piece. I will guess it had something to do with your hatred of Columbo. Sounds like he was a bad guy and based upon YOUR logic you have just made the case why no one should vote for Broom Hilda, she is a bad person, albeit a piker in that only 4 died due to her leadership.

I could suggest that you reread the piece but not sure that would help. By the way, its not really about HIM!

Dwell upon the last 4 lines, maybe it will help:

***"This is how it begins. And that is how it ends. Nations are not destroyed by atomic bombs or economic catastrophes; they are lost when they lose any reason to go on living. When they no longer have enough pride to go on fighting to survive.

The final note of politically correct lunacy comes from a headline in the Columbus Dispatch about the Columbus Day festival in the city of Columbus, Ohio. “Italian Festival honors controversial explorer with its own Columbus Day parade”.

Once the great discover of America, Columbus is now dubbed “controversial” by a newspaper named after him, in a city named after him .And if he is controversial, how can naming a city after him and a newspaper after the city not be equally controversial?

Can the day when USA Today has a headline reading, “Some cities still plan controversial 4th of July celebration of American independence” be far behind." ***

As for Cinco de Mayo wasn’t celebrated anywhere in the 1950s: Well again you are WRONG! I have been celebrating it all my life and I am not a Mexican…my guess is you have no idea what Cinco de Mayo is. We certainly celebrated it back in the '50’s…


#8

If Americans rejected Columbus “a century and a half ago,” why was the Colombian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893 and was a big success? It would have been held in 1892, the 400th anniversary, but construction problems delayed the opening.

Teachers made a big deal of Columbus when I was in grade school in the 1950s, so I don’t know the source of your “century and a half” claim unless you are basing it on some random comment by Marx or Engels.


#9

It was part of teaching our heritage and traditions.

Today, the Leftist-tool schoolteachers teach HATRED of our nation and culture - and of whites and Christians. We are going to have at LEAST two generations of irredeemably sick, disturbed young people on our hands, no matter what else happens.

The college-kids enthusiasm for Bernie the Red, isn’t a fluke - it’s a harbinger.


#10

:popc1:


#11

Far left + Lying + hate which is what they are all about…


#12

"“A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand.

  • Christopher Columbus

We rightfully give Muhammad crap for similar “exploits”. Why the **** does Columbus get a pass?

> Perhaps if you read a book or two about Columbus and knew something about the man, you would have a more objective view.

I’ll take your “book” and raise you Bartolome de las Casas, a Dominican friar who went along with Columbus in his later expeditions, and transcribed his Journal.

But our work was to exasperate, ravage, kill, mangle and destroy; small wonder, then, if they tried to kill one of us now and then… The admiral (Columbus), it is true, was blind as those who came after him, and he was so anxious to please the King that he committed irreparable crimes against the Indians …

[The Spaniards] thought nothing of knifing Indians by tens and twenties and of cutting slices off them to test the sharpness of their blades… two of these so-called Christians met two Indian boys one day, each carrying a parrot; they took the parrots and for fun beheaded the boys.

“*They attacked the towns and spared neither the children nor the aged nor pregnant women nor women in childbed, not only stabbing them and dismembering them but cutting them to pieces as if dealing with sheep in the slaughter house,”
*

This is a contemporary of Columbus criticizing him. And he wasn’t alone

In 2006, we discovered a report compiled by Francisco de Bobadilla, who was the vice-Governor of the Spanish colony. He, along with 23 others, testified to Columbus basically being a despot, mismanaging the colony into ruin:

Keep in mind, Columbus was sent back to Spain in chains because of this report. He only got out of being sentenced, because the King liked him. They just never appointed him a Governor again.

> Columbus was an innovator, and great seaman.

Neither; he was called “wrong” by his contemporaries because he got the circumference of the earth wrong.

He underestimated the size of China ( calling Marco Polo wrong), and over estimated how far east Japan was from its shore. All so as to justify a voyage sailing west from Europe. Because a journey that would cover the actual distance to Japan would never make it, and even then, everyone understood that. Except Columbus.

Columbus was wrong till the day he died. He thought to the end that he was in Asia, in the extremities of Marco Polo’s own destination.

> All races have committed atrocities. That is the simple, honest truth.

Bartolome de las Casas had blood on his hands; he spent the next 50 years trying to atone for it.

John Cabot, who (re)discovered North America, and set the groundwork for the English expeditions that later built the American Colonies, did no such damage to anyone.


#13

No, I got you point. Under different circumstances, it would be well met, but not here.

Bartolome de las Casas. He was a man who worked alongside Columbus, you should read what he said about him and the expeditions. Judge for yourself.

"*I, Fray Bartolomé de las Casas, or Casaus, friar of the
order of Saint Dominic, who by the mercy of God am
here today in this court of Spain, was persuaded by
the same notable persons resident in this Court . . . to
set down an accounting of the hell that is the Indies,
so that those infinite masses of souls redeemed by the
blood of Jesus Christ may not die for all eternity
without any help for it, but rather know their Creator
and be saved. And by the compassion that I have for
my native land, which is Castile, I pray that God not
destroy it for the great sins committed against its faith
and honour. . . .

I have great hope that the emperor and king of
Spain, our lord Don Carlos, the fifth of that name,
may come to understand (for until now the truth has
always been most industriously covered over) the acts
of malice and treachery which have been and still are
being done upon those nations and lands, against the
will of God and his own, and that he may bring an end
to so many evils and bring relief to that New World
which God has given him, as the lover and cultivator,
as he is of justice.*"

CASAS:*A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THE INDIES


#14

Pretty unforgivable given that the approximate circumference had been known for almost 2000 years at that point.

Eratosthenes of Cyrene calculated the circumference of the earth between 276BCE and 194BCE (his life) to within 0.5-17% accuracy depending on how his results are interpreted.


#15

I suppose you fail to realize the indians were not considered human at that time and what you allude to is meaningless and is the usual garbage you try to pass as fact while ignoring real history. ** History is your friend learn it**.

Another little tidbit is Columbus was jailed for political reasons at that time because there were a few who thought that when they landed they would be showered with riches and honey and found to their dismay they had to work to get it. This is similar to what we see today from guys like you.


#16

Sam, he is missing the point of the blog, its not about Columbo, its about the loss of the soul of America and as stated, how long before the 4th of July etc etc are removed from our calendars? Flying our flag is already in jeopardy and the current now nationwide assault on our national anthem.

The far left learned and were stung hard by their losses in the 60’s. I remember well the assault on the Constitution and the phrase used to describe it: ‘written by a bunch of old white men who owned slaves’ and the assault on our flag by burning it. What the left did was go straight to the top of our most important symbol and document, so they lost and lost big. But under Obama they have begun chipping away at what we call ‘low hanging fruit’, small targets, small wins that in our social media fabric become big. They know they must strip all the symbols away, our national holidays must become secular and cleansed of history and be given ‘new and improved’ justifications.

Sadly they are going to win this time…Alaska Slim will rejoice at least until his oil royalty check goes away, then he may not be so happy…


#17

Not only was Columbus and the early settlers still celebrated “back in the day”, it wasn’t even the distant past. I started grade school in 1992. We still had a positive take on the founding of the country.

I will grant, by the time I’d hit middle school(around 99), I saw an increasing shift towards “America is bad. White people are bad. Everything bad that ever happened was perpetuated by white men, and white people today owe every non-white person an eternal apology and deference.”

But even that didn’t really hit full steam until after I graduated from high school in '04. The push really started back in 2006, and didn’t really break through to a consensus in education until the last few years.

This is certainly true. He was wrong about where he landed, and he indeed did seriously mess up by trying to sail West for Asia. Had his understanding that all that lay between Europe and Asia was an ocean been correct, both he and his entire crew would have surely died on the voyage.

However, that mistake is exactly why this country exists today. Columbus was a lucky idiot. Europe never would have settled NA, if they thought there was nothing but an ocean between Europe and Asia traveling West.


#18

I remember once reading a pamphlet which reflected the British side of history and the allusion that the people in America were criminals who spearheaded the revolution to gain power. The fact that many of these people lost lives and fortunes was not addressed.

I imagine that if I bothered to look the Governor of Plymouth Rock would be accused of being evil for dropping his idea to embrace socialism once it was discovered there were those who refused to work but wanted to share what others did. ** Sound familiar**?

Which brings up thanksgiving and those who think we should not celebrate it but want to celebrate a bloody Cuba murderer,Che Guevara


#19

Yes, an why didn’t Columbus Google “Cyrene” and find out this on his lap top?

Get serious. The “cheap” Gutenberg Bible was not published until 1455 with its moveable type. The flow of information was so slow in those days it would make you head spin. Most of the information was stored in monestaries where few people had access to it if they could read at all.


#20

Give me a break, someone like Columbus would have had access to that kind of information. I mean, the myth often attributed to him, that he set out to prove the world wasn’t flat…How did he know it wasn’t flat? Did he need a laptop to know that? No, that was reasonably common knowlage of people of that day. Given that the world had been shown to be round and it’s approximate circumference known almost 2000 years before, I’m certain that he should have known what he was trying to do with the technology availible to him wasn’t possible.