Freakin IDIOT...no, that denegrates idiots

Yeah, I think few people take the actual Mensa test. They submit tests taken elsewhere. I took a comprehensive test battery at the State Job service in Peoria, IL. The IQ test was only part of that. Dexterity tests (I scored 72 in the manual, 27 in the finger

  • these are all percentiles, btw); clerical recognition tests - scored 99 in that. It was easy, but I could have completed more of it (rarely does anyone complete any of these tests) if I hadn’t kept double-checking my answers. It simply had two words - well, essentially, two of the same word, and you had to respond “same” or “different.” I double-checked the “same” ones, but the different ones stood out like a sore thumb, showing how foolish I was to double check). There were numerical tests, can’t remember how those worked, some kind of math stuff, I think, spatial perception. Can’t remember how I did on that, although I’ve still got the results around somewhere. The IQ test was completely separate from everything else. It also included an interest test. In the IQ test, I scored the highest anyone ever had in that office. The head of the office had been the highest scorer before I came along.
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I was talking about this with my sister-in-law at the reunion. I had started college as a music education major. I have difficulty with brain-to-finger co-ordination, and if I had to play the piano in front of the class, I couldn’t stop practicing just when I felt comfortable with it in the practice room. I had to keep working and working at it long past that point, or I would be sure to flub if called upon to play in class. Well, one time that happened. The teacher took me to task about it later, and I said, “Well, I’ve got it in my head, but not in my fingers.” She said, “That’s impossible!” How I wished, after I took those tests, that I could have shown her that I scored in the 99 percentile in “what was in my head,” and only in the 27 percentile in “what was in my fingers.”

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There was something wrong with that test.

Seriously!

I was also once a member of MENSA…even went to some of their meetings, but dropped out when I began to understand that they were mutual masturbation sessions and little else. The members spent all their time sitting around talking about how much smarter they were than anyone else and complaining that they weren’t “in charge” of much of anything. It was just boring.

Well, they were obviously “in charge” of one thing…

Didn’t happen in the ones that I went to. We talked about ordinary things for the most part. The ones you went to sound somewhat like the stereotype of meetings (gatherings, they usually call them, stressing the informality) held by high IQ societies. None of them I went to were anything like that. In some of the “large” gatherings (we had local gatherings, but also larger ones to which people came from all over), there were specific “activities,” and you went to the ones that held your interest. I went to the Dayton Area Gathering (one of the larger ones, an annual event) several times. Otherwise, we had monthly get-togethers, mostly completely informal, sometimes with a guest speaker. As I said, though, people mostly talked about normal things, like children, if you have them. One meeting my daughter went to with me (when she was a nursing mother) there were a bunch of women talking about nursing babies; one said, “I nursed my kids because, frankly, I’m too lazy to fix bottles.” (Something like that).

On the other hand, a friend and I went to an introductory meeting for University Women of America. We both decided we didn’t want to join - they were little more than a feminist’s activist group. We both wondered why our friend who had introduced us to it belonged. She attended a Mensa meeting with me once, and enjoyed it. She would have qualified, I don’t know why she never joined, unless she felt she didn’t have the time to devout to it - or perhaps she didn’t know how to go about it. But if it was the latter, she would probably have asked me.

[quote=“Pappadave, post:53, topic:44311”]
I was also once a member of MENSA…even went to some of their meetings, but dropped out when I began to understand that they were mutual masturbation sessions and little else. The members spent all their time sitting around talking about how much smarter they were than anyone else and complaining that they weren’t “in charge” of much of anything. It was just boring.
[/quote] yep, been there, done that.

MENSA is a society of middle management if truth be told, they are always complaining about not being in charge of enough.

Nah; just something wrong with JBG’s tongue vis-a-vis his cheek…

[quote=“Fantasy_Chaser, post:58, topic:44311”]
Nah; just something wrong with JBG’s tongue vis-a-vis his cheek…
[/quote] snookered again! there must have been something wrong with another** test–the one that got me into Mensa!

I dig! Sometimes (more often, lately) I’m of the opinion that they allowed me in because they needed the dues.

[quote=“Pappadave, post:60, topic:44311”]
I dig! Sometimes (more often, lately) I’m of the opinion that they allowed me in because they needed the dues.
[/quote] anything is possible. I know for a fact that my passing a swimming test long ago was…I believe it’s called a “social promotion.” something i’m normally against. I did flail my way across the pool somehow but the instructors were laying bets. They also wanted to know which stroke or strokes I was supposedly using. this was for Peace Corps and I did not end up being stationed anywhere near water anyway. that may not have been an accident.

Perhaps I should have been given a “bicycle riding test” instead, as I eventually wiped out on my bicycle and totaled it. Got a concussion out of that (your grandson I understand is now in the same “club”), so long before I had a stroke, if I did something less than brilliant I would put a pitiful look on my face and say, "Well, you know,I had a concussion and I’ve been this way ever since:eusa_boohoo:

Until I wiped out on my bike, I had to rely on the Altitude Excuse (we lived at close to 7,000 ft). “It’s the altitude, man!”

p.s. my five year old great niece enters diving competitions–and does quite well.** if I ever get my image uploading back, you better believe i’ll put a picture up. busting my buttons.

Good for her. I used to do that myself–‘way back in the day. I did 1 and 3 meter springboard diving and freestyle and backstroke sprints in swimming. In general, limited to 50 and 100 meter events. I CAN do the butterfly and breaststroke, but not well enough to compete. I was pretty fast in my day, though. I actually placed 6th in the U.S. National Jr. Olympics 3-meter diving competition once, but that was around 1958. That, incidentally, took place in Indianapolis, IN, at the Broadripple Park pool in the coldest water for a public swimming pool I’ve ever been in. I swore that they ran it through a chiller before filling the pool up. (It actually came out of an artesian well.) The diving pool was 25’ deep under the 10-meter platform. Somewhere around here is a photo my mother took of me in the early stages of one of my dives in that competition–a forward 2 1/2 somersault pike, if I recall and, if you look closely you’ll see that my feet are about 8" apart…which is probably part of the reason why I only placed 6th. I was never technically “perfect.”

[quote=“Pappadave, post:62, topic:44311”]
Good for her. I used to do that myself–‘way back in the day. I did 1 and 3 meter springboard diving and freestyle and backstroke sprints in swimming. In general, limited to 50 and 100 meter events. I CAN do the butterfly and breaststroke, but not well enough to compete. I was pretty fast in my day, though. I actually placed 6th in the U.S. National Jr. Olympics 3-meter diving competition once, but that was around 1958. That, incidentally, took place in Indianapolis, IN, at the Broadripple Park pool in the coldest water for a public swimming pool I’ve ever been in. I swore that they ran it through a chiller before filling the pool up. (It actually came out of an artesian well.) The diving pool was 25’ deep under the 10-meter platform. Somewhere around here is a photo my mother took of me in the early stages of one of my dives in that competition–a forward 2 1/2 somersault pike, if I recall and, if you look closely you’ll see that my feet are about 8" apart…which is probably part of the reason why I only placed 6th. I was never technically “perfect.”
[/quote] you obviously are very comfortable both in the water, and above it (on a diving board). I am very uncomfortable in both places!

My bro, the grandfather of our little diving phenom, is quite a bit better in water than I, but I still like to tease him about the very first time he dove. He decided to cover all bases. He went to the end of the board, loudly shouted “HELP” and then jumped off. He did a perfectly fine job and no help was needed, but he had given himself a little extra insurance!

You were not only comfortable but highly proficient. Your performance in Indianapolis was very impressive indeed. Wish I could share a few of my pics of my niece in action, you could give a professional evaluation!

I almost literally grew up in a public swimming pool at Rhodius Park in Indianapolis, IN. I started going there around age 3 and practically LIVED in the water all summer long. I was a cotton-top and one year I’d spent so much time in that pool I started school in early September with GREEN hair! We live across the street from that park and I hit the pool every day that it was open, sometimes not getting home until dark. It was at that pool that I began my athletic “career” (such as it was) by swimming and diving on the park’s team starting about age 8. The longest swim I ever made was across Petosky Bay in Lake Michigan when I was about 14. I am VERY comfortable in the water and even worked as a lifeguard one summer at a State Park public beach at age 17.

I used to dive, too. I love the water…any water. Both of my younger sisters were on swim and dive teams in high school and my middle sister worked as a life guard all through college and beyond. Swimming is the best exercise for anyone, but especially for those people who have achy joints, chronic pain, or muscle problems. That’s the only thing I wish my building had.

The truth is they fear us!!!We can put a stop to their evils & they do not like that.Some people fear the people in religion thinking they will take over.Also they think they are trying to take away womens rights.

You have to understand that certain people live in a wonderland/fantasy land or just delusional.THEY PRETEND THAT THINGS ARE FINE/DANDY BUT IT MAY NOT BE THAT WAY.

Oh, I was never anywhere near “professional” level. I am a fan of springboard diving and watch competitions on TV whenever possible. I even view them with a somewhat critical eye, but today’s divers are 'WAY above any level that I was ever at. There are techniques today for “splashless” entry that no one knew about in my day, for example.