Home School Success


#1

This is a rather amazing story of a family in Alabama that homeschools their large 10 kid family and SO FAR has had 6 kids attending COLLEGE by age 12.
No Geniuses apparently… just hard work and a love of learning cultivated.
My guess is the public schools in Montgomery wouldn’t have gotten the same results.
Well worth your time to read:
Meet the family who sent six kids to college by age 12 - TODAY.com


#2

As I understand a homeschool cirriculum, if they simply model the public school equivalent topic coverage, the school day only lasts about 3 hours. Even then, they usually surpass their public school counterparts. So, if the kids are subjected to a full day of study every day, they could move through the public school grade equivalent in half the time. More individual attention makes a difference.

I know several people thaet homeschool and this seems to be their experience. Many started after the children had been in public school for several years. Even then, they are usually completed with high school equivalence by age 16. Most go to college.

I do know of some people who homeschool their autistic children or special needs children that just weren’t being accommodated by the local school. Those children may not excel but end up doing much better than if left in public school.


#3

This homeschool issue pop’s up every so often. And as much as I like the whole idea and find in many instances it really works, there are as many times it fails. One of my daughters has to home school because she took on a quad of abused children [four in one family] and the abuse they suffered would make you absolutely sick, starting from age 2, she has now had them for 4 years and because of behavioral problems does home school them except fot the times she has to place them in local institutions for various issues. She still has 2 of her own at home one very special needs who ‘graduates’ Hs next year [ he is on a level of a 5 year old] and a daughter who is an honors student. [She also has two boys both graduated, one an Army sgt the other a youth pastor. Home Schooling helps with the four but public school worked for her others. Private Christian Schools are a Blessing where they are supported.


#4

Homeschooling is not for every situation. Homeschooling parents will tell you that. Although, I have seen more success than failure with it. Special needs children usually benefit from it because many locals schools simply cannot or will not accommodate their special needs. Gifted children on the opposite side of the special needs spectrum and they also benefit.


#5

This 2008 article has a bit more about the family:

The Harding Family
Posted: Oct 27, 2008 7:06 PM PDT Updated: Oct 27, 2008 7:06 PM PDT

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) - The Harding family is one of this year’s Families of the Year nominees, but not because of its size.

The Hardings are giving back to their community, and they’re making sure their children learn a lesson in education and the economy.

While learning and teaching are the root of the Harding family tree, it’s their faith that makes it grow.

The Hardings volunteer at their church for Celebrate Recovery, a 12-step drug and alcohol program.

They make volunteering a family affair.

One reason the Harding’s were nominated for the Families of the Year awards is because of their teamwork.

Kip Harding says through these hard economic times families must pull together. It’s something he calls his families’ strength and what he wants others to seem in them.

“We’re Americans we can get through this mess…we can do it family by family…a strong family makes a strong nation…we believe that.”

Colleges here in CA aren’t quite as flexible. About 10 years ago our local JC started requiring that “concurrent enrollment” student be at least age 16. Whether they could do that legally, and whether they still require that, I don’t know. Our youngest was 16 when she first enrolled there. “If they’re going to be working at my kitchen table,” Mona Lisa says with a smile, “why not earn college credit for what they’re doing?” Other than our kids’ study places in our house, that was pretty much our thinking.

As I understand a homeschool cirriculum, if they simply model the public school equivalent topic coverage, the school day only lasts about 3 hours.

Homeschooling methods vary very widely. At one extreme is “Unschooling”, which does little formal teaching and doesn’t really follow any sort of subject scope and sequence. Unschooled children basically are allowed to follow and develop their interests, and basic stuff like Reading and Math and Science are learned because they are needed to pursue their interest(s). At the other extreme is “School at Home” (a snide term coined by Unschooling types, BTW, but which captures the essence of what is done), who use a “boxed curriculum” (the full set of books and materials from a particular publisher), duplicate a school classroom atmosphere (including desks, whiteboards, subject scheduling, etc.), and more or less follow their state’s scope and sequence for subjects. Guess what? Both can work very well, depending on the personalities of the teaching parents and their students.

The Hardings seem to be a hybrid, as to method, leaning School-at-Home at young ages to teach basic tools more formally, and then gradually unleashing their kids to pursue their interests as they grow older and have the tools for their pursuit. That’s pretty much what we did as well.

I don’t see homeschooling as an “issue”, though many PS educrats and the teacher’s unions make it an issue, working hard through legislatures, courts and bureaucratic overreach to try to legislate/litigate/regulate homeschooling out of existence.


#6

Homeschooling is not for every situation. Homeschooling parents will tell you that.

Yeppers, said that many a time, and we led a homeschooling support group and worked at homeschooling conventions. So we had ample opportunity to give that advice.


#7

If they’d clean up their own act, and be competitive, there wouldn’t (or shouldn’t) be an issue.


#8

Using legislatures, bureaucrats and courts to hobble and harass competitors feel easier and satisfy frustrations and anger. Being competitive is hard work, especially when your “product” uses “materials” whose “quality” you can’t control (teachers can’t force students to want to learn or undo the influences of students’ horrible or anti-learning home lives and social circles).

But using legislatures, bureaucrats and courts to hobble and harass competitors isn’t peculiar to teacher’s unions or unions generally. Businesses use bureaucrats and courts against their competitors with some frequency. As do Luddite Enviros and “nutrition” faddists. As do race advocate groups, feminists, Pro-Abortionists …


#9

Meet Ben Swann, New Fox19 Anchor | TV and Media Blog

–He was home schooled in El Paso, Texas, along with his nine brothers and sisters. They were all on a fast track. He earned a bachelor’s in liberal arts from BYU in 1993, at age 15. He got a master’s in history at 16, in 1994.


#10

Cam: There is no way public schools would have gotten the same results. First of all, public schools do not allow students to advance ahead of their grade-age. If parents want that, they have to either enroll their kids in a charter school or private school. Also, public schools cannot produce those kinds of results because they don’t have the capabilities to do that. Let’s remember that public schools for the past 40 years have whittled academic standards down to the lowest common denominator so that everyone feels good about themselves–except those kids who need to be challenged–they’re bored to tears most of the time and when they’re not, they’re getting into trouble because of monotonous boredom. I will grant you that there are exceptions to this in schools where teaching still occurs. But, those schools are the exception. And the results from this particular family is very common amongst homeschooling families. Parents DO know what’s best for their children despite what the lefties and educrats claim. There is also a Christian family of 22 children (they had a show on some channel some years ago) where mom homeschools all of her kids while dad works. When they built a new, bigger home, dad and mom used the opportunity to teach the children what it takes to build a home. Much of the work was done by the kids and dad. Pretty amazing story. I don’t remember their names but I remember they were devout Christians.


#11

Most homeschooling parents model very little from public schools. But you are correct in that homeschooling parents can accomplish more in 1/2 the time of public schools and even private schools. I worked with a group of homeschooling parents in Michigan. We met once a month to discuss curricula, resources, and problematic areas. We also had speakers come in who were knowledgeable about the law regarding homeschooling in Michigan. In addition, educational field trips, special classes (archery, etc.) were made available to the homeschooling students. In the upper grades, social interactions such as athletic teams and other hobby enthusiasts were also supported and encouraged. Kids were not allowed to get bored. The busier they were, the better off they were. That’s why there is very little teenage problems amongst farming areas–kids are too busy to get into trouble.


#12

Public schools will always have an issue with homeschooling or any other program (vouchers, for example) which takes $$ out of the pocket of the unions, federations and NEA. Public schools are not in the business of education–they are in the business of making certain people wealthy. A pretty clear example of this is the recent teacher strikes in Chicago and other places. Public schools are beyond repair. they will NEVER be competitive because then they would expose the truth about public schools in that they do not educate. They indoctrinate. They need to be torn down completely along with all the other tentacles which reach into taxpayer’s pockets.


#13

Most of the homeschoolers that I know have regular meetings with other homeschoolers in the area and do many of the things that you mentioned.


#14

I know a family near Houston Texas who I won’t name to protect them from persecution by the Left. The children were all home birthed and home schooled. The oldest son passed the Bar exam in three States and is practicing Law in California, (wasn’t allowed to take the Bar exam in Texas because Texas required a Degree from an ‘accredited Law school’ before taking the exam.)
They’re a large family and all the adult chldren have professional careers.
Homeschooled children can understandably develop an attitude of superiority and that can hinder them in their social skills, but with parental guidance that can be avoided.
This is a Christian Conservative family and you could have no better friends. If they tell you something, you can count on it! I consider my friendship withthis family to be a blessing.


#15

Yes…my remark about Montgomery was tongue in cheek. Vouchers remain the answer to the public school and they should be available to parents who home school provided the kids are passing their annual grade level exams…to help ease the financial burden of staying home to teach. I know a lot of home schooling is done by Christians out of concern for what is being promulgated in public schools…but a lot is also done because of the academics and/or around the needs of the kids for individual attention due to various factors. There have long been SECULAR instruction courses available to such parents (like the Calvert School courses) which allow parents not well versed in particular subjects to nevertheless see that they are taught properly. Today…the online offerings make it possible for almost any parent with the desire and time to do so…to provide a MUCH more challenging and fact based education to their kids.
Many school districts around the country will allow home schooled kids to participate in extra-curricular activities as well…plays, team sports etc. which I think is the only shortcoming of an education at home. There is a socialization process which is needed for kids to become well adjusted adults and careful attention to seeking out appropriate GROUP activities should not be neglected especially as kids enter their teens.


#16

I’m sure that homeschooling has some success stories although using homeschooling as a means to shelter a child from the “bad” parts of society will ultimately leave them woefully unprepared to enter that society when they reach the point that they actually have to. You run the risk of leaving your children defenseless when they set out in the world. If you don’t get practice making the right choices when you are growing up, you won’t know how to do it when you are grown up.


#17

[quote=“OldStyleBlues, post:16, topic:39129”]
I’m sure that homeschooling has some success stories although using homeschooling as a means to shelter a child from the “bad” parts of society will ultimately leave them woefully unprepared to enter that society when they reach the point that they actually have to. You run the risk of leaving your children defenseless when they set out in the world. If you don’t get practice making the right choices when you are growing up, you won’t know how to do it when you are grown up.
[/quote]Horse manure and hogwash. What? You think that only public school can prepare a child to “cope” with society? Amazing.


#18

Everybody doesnt have to go to Chicago


#19

[quote=“Tiny1, post:17, topic:39129”]
Horse manure and hogwash. What? You think that only public school can prepare a child to “cope” with society? Amazing.
[/quote] kids need to engage people outside of the nuclear family and be able to apply their values in a real life setting, making good choices, not because their parents told them to, but because they have evaluated situations and people and can come to good decisions on their own using their life expereinces as a guide. I also feel that many homeschoolers run into difficulties because the attempt to change educational content while keeping the traditional, hierarchical, school model.


#20

[quote=“OldStyleBlues, post:19, topic:39129”]
kids need to engage people outside of the nuclear family and be able to apply their values in a real life setting, making good choices, not because their parents told them to, but because they have evaluated situations and people and can come to good decisions on their own using their life expereinces as a guide. I also feel that many homeschoolers run into difficulties because the attempt to change educational content while keeping the traditional, hierarchical, school model.
[/quote]Do not preach at me about preparing kids. I had seven and one with a Social Disability called Asperger’s Syndrome. I KNOW exactly what I am talking about.
Just because someone is home schooled, does not mean they are isolated. I am sure that is the picture in your mind’s eye. There are after school activities, such as the YMCA and local activities our town puts on. There are church, community and private organizations that provide programs that support social adjustment.
Public school is the worst choice to accomplish what you suggest. Believe me, I am aware.
Difficulties? If that were the case, home schooled kids wouldn’t be doing better, than their public school counterparts. Home schooled GPA was about .30 better. They were better at Daily Living, Communication, Socialization and Maturity, than those educated by the Gooberment.
Your “theory” is Bafflegag.