Homeschooling growing seven times faster than public school enrollment


#1

As dissatisfaction with the U.S. public school system grows, apparently so has the appeal of homeschooling. Educational researchers, in fact, are expecting a surge in the number of students educated at home by their parents over the next ten years, as more parents reject public schools.

A recent report in Education News states that, since 1999, the number of children who are homeschooled has increased by 75%. Though homeschooled children represent only 4% of all school-age children nationwide, the number of children whose parents choose to educate them at home rather than a traditional academic setting is growing seven times faster than the number of children enrolling in grades K-12 every year.

Report: Homeschooling Growing Seven Times Faster than Public School Enrollment

With the growing phenomenon of our schools turning into liberal pools of indoctrination to graduate little Obamaites and to destroy this country’s values and national identity it is no wonder people are turning to home schooling.

From just listening to the rantings of children who come out of these environments with a total lack of skills except walk in lock step with the liberal philosophy.

Children are being taught phony history and to sing praise to Obama instead of the three Rs.


#2

It’s not just religious people that are homeschooling. Parents are seeing the dumbed down and negative results of many one-size-fits-all educational programs being pushed by the feds and then the states.

IN has resisted and even refused to implement some of these programs but, it’s just a matter of time.


#3

[quote=“Conservative_Libertarian, post:2, topic:39760”]
It’s not just religious people that are homeschooling. Parents are seeing the dumbed down and negative results of many one-size-fits-all educational programs being pushed by the feds and then the states.

IN has resisted and even refused to implement some of these programs but, it’s just a matter of time.
[/quote]As long as the federal government has the power to force schools to implement what they what taught by withholding funding the schools have little choice. Also remember, the federal government is trying to tell private schools what they must teach and do.


#4

There are Progressive communist posters here on RO that advocate just that because–you guessed it–the tuth is incorrect.


#5

All families - not just the religious - are impacted negatively by poor academic performance by public schools.

The best public schools may still have some teachers who are poor, and union work rules make firing such teachers very difficult, costly in time and $$. One or two poor teachers can damage the education of scores of students, every school year.

All families - not just the religious - are impacted negatively by poor safety in schools.

All families - not just the religious - are impacted negatively by no-thought hoplophobic acts of oppression.

All families - not just the religious - are impacted negatively by ideologized - often by state mandate - teaching of subjects such as History and Science.

All families - not just the religious - are impacted negatively by by state mandates to expend classroom time on special-interests-driven topics of little academic value.

While religious families are most directly affected by schools’ hostility - when it happens - to religion (usually to theologically conservative Christianity and Judaism) and morality, non-religious families are also affected (just less obviously).

As long as these problems plague public schools to a significant degree, campus-based private schools and homeschooling will grow with a ceiling of the number of people able to find ways to afford those alternatives.


#6

I almost started a new thread with this:
German Homeschooling Family Will Take Their Fight to the Supreme Court | TheBlaze.com


#7

JIC no one’s seen the ad, the public school system is countering its biggest competition by offering “on line” courses for those who are “bored”, or need “extra personal attention” or are “distracted by classroom noise.”

The ad ends w/some fat lady with a huge grin just plum tickled to pieces of having, (and I quote),
“The best of both worlds.”

I thought I’d hurl.


#8

From just listening to the rantings of children who come out of these environments with a total lack of skills except walk in lock step with the liberal philosophy.

I am offended by this statement, given that I attend a blue-state public school. I am fluent in French, I can write code in Java, Python, and Scratch, I can write geometric proofs, explain why the tides are the way they are, describe Milankovich cycles, use mass-spectrometry to identify elements, explain the inner workings of basic molecules and particles and why certain materials behave certain ways, I can draft technical drawings, I can use a microscope and a bunsen burner, I can make furniture out of wood, I can cook ethnic dishes, I can critique food and comment on its flavor, tone, texture and style, I can draw, I can preform advanced algebra, discuss with you the nuances of any book you choose, think critically, write in a variety of styles, including business letters, resumés, essays, proposals, literary criticism and historical analysis, I can discus with you the specifics of the Concert of Europe, and describe how the Opium Wars affect China to this day. I understand electricity, computers, tools, basic physics, geometry, chemistry, history, art, music, theatre, food, algebra, trigonometry, astronomy, geology, biology, oceanography, meteorology, poetry, philosophy, french language and culture, US history, world history, literature and many other besides.

Above all, I am an independent thinker, to the extent that any human can be.

Children are being taught phony history and to sing praise to Obama instead of the three Rs.

I think that this is an unfair statement. I live in a generally wealthy and educated town in one of the bluest states in the union. I go to public school, I am taught by unionized teachers, and I follow a common curriculum and take standardized tests in my state. I go to one of the bogey schools. And yet, teachers take great pains to avoid disseminating political ideologies (I don’t consider the teaching of evolution ideologically motivated). We say the Pledge of Allegiance each morning, and have both Republican and Democrat youth groups. There are people with beliefs at all ends of the spectrum. One teacher is Orrin Hatch’s son. Many others are ex-military. Some (mostly the English teachers), are as liberal as can be.

My AP US History teacher next year asked us to read a textbook over the summer vacation specifically because it leaned right. One of my prior history teachers was a military mom and NRA member. And this is in Massachusetts, home to Ted Kennedy and Elizabeth Warren.

I do not mean this as an attack on private schools or homeschooling: many of my close friends go to private schools, and I know of several students that are homeschooled. I merely mean to point out that all is not lost.

Parents are seeing the dumbed down and negative results of many one-size-fits-all educational programs being pushed by the feds and then the states.

ConLib-

I am with you on this one. Schools must be allowed creativity and flexibility. I talked with my superintendent about this (his son is a Boy Scout with me) and he said that this is a very important issue. Sir Ken Robinson has delivered some great talks on that subject:

Ken Robinson | Profile on TED.com


#9

[quote=“cynicaloptimist, post:8, topic:39760”]
I am offended by this statement, given that I attend a blue-state public school. I am fluent in French, I can write code in Java, Python, and Scratch, I can write geometric proofs, explain why the tides are the way they are, describe Milankovich cycles, use mass-spectrometry to identify elements, explain the inner workings of basic molecules and particles and why certain materials behave certain ways, I can draft technical drawings, I can use a microscope and a bunsen burner, I can make furniture out of wood, I can cook ethnic dishes, I can critique food and comment on its flavor, tone, texture and style, I can draw, I can preform advanced algebra, discuss with you the nuances of any book you choose, think critically, write in a variety of styles, including business letters, resumés, essays, proposals, literary criticism and historical analysis, I can discus with you the specifics of the Concert of Europe, and describe how the Opium Wars affect China to this day. I understand electricity, computers, tools, basic physics, geometry, chemistry, history, art, music, theatre, food, algebra, trigonometry, astronomy, geology, biology, oceanography, meteorology, poetry, philosophy, french language and culture, US history, world history, literature and many other besides.

Above all, I am an independent thinker, to the extent that any human can be.

I think that this is an unfair statement. I live in a generally wealthy and educated town in one of the bluest states in the union. I go to public school, I am taught by unionized teachers, and I follow a common curriculum and take standardized tests in my state. I go to one of the bogey schools. And yet, teachers take great pains to avoid disseminating political ideologies (I don’t consider the teaching of evolution ideologically motivated). We say the Pledge of Allegiance each morning, and have both Republican and Democrat youth groups. There are people with beliefs at all ends of the spectrum. One teacher is Orrin Hatch’s son. Many others are ex-military. Some (mostly the English teachers), are as liberal as can be.

My AP US History teacher next year asked us to read a textbook over the summer vacation specifically because it leaned right. One of my prior history teachers was a military mom and NRA member. And this is in Massachusetts, home to Ted Kennedy and Elizabeth Warren.

I do not mean this as an attack on private schools or homeschooling: many of my close friends go to private schools, and I know of several students that are homeschooled. I merely mean to point out that all is not lost.

ConLib-

I am with you on this one. Schools must be allowed creativity and flexibility. I talked with my superintendent about this (his son is a Boy Scout with me) and he said that this is a very important issue. Sir Ken Robinson has delivered some great talks on that subject:

Ken Robinson | Profile on TED.com
[/quote](Deleted by RWNJ)


#10

Trolling according to About.com:

“Internet ‘trolling’ is the anti-social act of causing of interpersonal conflict and shock-value controversy online. Named for the wicked troll creatures of children’s tales, trolling is purposely sowing hatred, bigotry, racism, misogyny, or just simple bickering between others. Trolls themselves are emotionally-immature users who thrive in any environment where they are allowed to make public comments, like blog sites, news sites, discussion forums, and game chat”

I did not intend to provoke any kind of bickering, I merely wished to share my views on the matter raised by you, the OP. I apologize for any offense I caused you, and rue the fact that what I said could be construed as trolling. Many others on this forum can tell you that despite the fact that my political views occasionally differ from some members (as is the case for everyone here), I always strive to be courteous, polite, and friendly.


#11

Private schools are their own worst enemy. If they accept a single dime from the federal government, they then come under the thumb of the federal government’s educational mandates. The worst thing a private school can do is to take money from the government. Once they do, the government ties their hands behind their backs. That is why private schools today, especially Catholic schools, are no longer the bastions of educational excellence they once were. To be sure, they are 100 times better than the best public school, but they were at one time eons ahead of public schools. When the nuns abandoned the Catholic schools in droves back in the 60’s and 70’s, the Catholic schools were put in a life or death situation. Nuns work (still today) for at least 50% less than what lay teachers are paid. Now that Catholic schools have to meet the payroll for an almost exclusively layperson run operation, they wind up financially strapped. Where to go? Well, many have been lured by the government’s sticky fingers. But, there is a high price to pay–and it is evident in the caliber of students graduating from Catholic schools. I was lucky enough to be able to operate a Catholic school which ran on tuition, fund-raising, and generous benefactors–so we did not come under the thumb of the fed government. But, it isn’t easy to do.


#12

I’ve seen that ad. This is just another attempt by the marxist-commie public school monster from grabbing back those taxpayer dollars they lose every time a parent chooses to homeschool their child. On average, public schools receive $10,000 per child per year. That’s a lot of sticking their fingers into our pockets. So, imo, this is just an attempt to grab back those $$$. But, some people are pretty stupid and will fall for this.


#13

Let me just say that you have accomplished those skills despite the influence of public schools, not because of them. Public schools are a miserable failure and have been for over 50 years. The entire public school system should be completely demolished from the local school boards, NEA, teacher unions & federations, departments of education in colleges and universities, and the teachers themselves. What other employer would allow its employees to consistently fail at their job year after year after year??? None. They’d be fired by any other employer. This problem in the public schools is not just poor teaching, a rotten curriculum (Common Core), educational standards lower than the lowest common denominator, and nuttiness from teachers and administrators. It goes much deeper than that. There are several threads which address this very topic–many of which I have spent a lot of time defending my position. I’m not going to repeat them here. You are welcome to search them and read them. I have been a teacher for over 25 years…7 of those years as a principal in three schools. I am a classically trained teacher as well. You are the exception–not the rule. And I would guess that your knowledge and skills were not garnered in the public school system, but outside of it.


#14

I think there is definitely some validity to what you are saying: tenured teachers are an occasional problem at are school, as is the MCAS (our standardized tests). But I would disagree with you when you say that many of my skills are not due to public schools. To the contrary, many of my interests have been stimulated and expanded by excellent teachers that I have had over the years.

I believe my school is an example that public schools can work, given the right attitude, funding, and approach. My school routinely outscores private schools on AP tests, and it is rare for anyone to receive lower than a four. Last year our graduation rate from freshman to senior was 100%. Almost all of our students either went to college or enlisted in the military last year. ten went to Dartmouth, three to Harvard, two to Yale and six to Cornell (I don’t have numbers on other schools) I have the option of taking a variety of classes, from 3D art, to woodworking, auto shop, finance, 6 languages, a variety of gym classes, and many other specialized and engaging classes. Teachers are engaging, interesting, and accessible.

Our school, however, has a number of things going for it. For one, we are extremely well endowed, and thus attract the best and brightest teachers with high salaries. Also, many adults in our town have advanced degrees or college degrees, and many students do not struggle with the kinds of problems students at other schools do (this doesn’t mean that we don’t have lots of less fortunate students - there is a housing development in my town and a METCO program, not to mention just residents of the town. But the overall attitude is one that cherishes education, expects that one goes to college, or at least graduates, and that school is useful.

It is because of my school, which is just an ordinary public school, not a magnet or charter school, that I have hope for the potential of public school education. The conditions in my school should not be hard to create:
1. Schools must be well funded, and funding must not be tied to curriculum or test scores
2. The salaries of public school teachers must be high, to entice college graduates to pursue that path
3. Facilities must be well-kept, sufficient and welcoming
4. Curriculum must be broad, accommodating a wide range of fields and interests, and incorporate real world and job training to try and keep kids in school (incorporate elements of vocational and magnet schools)
5. Schools must hire guidance and college counselors, who can talk to students about their lives, the future, keep them in school, and encourage them to go to college.
6. Teaching must be flexible and engaging, and there must be programs available for slower learners.
7. Teachers must be subject to training, firing, and other disciplinary and constructive processes without hampering agreements and union opposition.

I believe that with this combination of factors, added to an attitude around the school and the nation that cherishes education, public schools can be revived. Most of these factors are tied to #1 - funding is key.

P.S. I didn’t find any of the threads you mentioned - they must be pretty far back.


#15

[quote=“cynicaloptimist, post:8, topic:39760”]
I am offended by this statement, given that I attend a blue-state public school. I am fluent in French, I can write code in Java, Python, and Scratch, I can write geometric proofs, explain why the tides are the way they are, describe Milankovich cycles, use mass-spectrometry to identify elements, explain the inner workings of basic molecules and particles and why certain materials behave certain ways, I can draft technical drawings, I can use a microscope and a bunsen burner, I can make furniture out of wood, I can cook ethnic dishes, I can critique food and comment on its flavor, tone, texture and style, I can draw, I can preform advanced algebra, discuss with you the nuances of any book you choose, think critically, write in a variety of styles, including business letters, resumés, essays, proposals, literary criticism and historical analysis, I can discus with you the specifics of the Concert of Europe, and describe how the Opium Wars affect China to this day. I understand electricity, computers, tools, basic physics, geometry, chemistry, history, art, music, theatre, food, algebra, trigonometry, astronomy, geology, biology, oceanography, meteorology, poetry, philosophy, french language and culture, US history, world history, literature and many other besides.

Above all, I am an independent thinker, to the extent that any human can be.

I think that this is an unfair statement. I live in a generally wealthy and educated town in one of the bluest states in the union. I go to public school, I am taught by unionized teachers, and I follow a common curriculum and take standardized tests in my state. I go to one of the bogey schools. And yet, teachers take great pains to avoid disseminating political ideologies (I don’t consider the teaching of evolution ideologically motivated). We say the Pledge of Allegiance each morning, and have both Republican and Democrat youth groups. There are people with beliefs at all ends of the spectrum. One teacher is Orrin Hatch’s son. Many others are ex-military. Some (mostly the English teachers), are as liberal as can be.

My AP US History teacher next year asked us to read a textbook over the summer vacation specifically because it leaned right. One of my prior history teachers was a military mom and NRA member. And this is in Massachusetts, home to Ted Kennedy and Elizabeth Warren.

I do not mean this as an attack on private schools or homeschooling: many of my close friends go to private schools, and I know of several students that are homeschooled. I merely mean to point out that all is not lost.

ConLib-

I am with you on this one. Schools must be allowed creativity and flexibility. I talked with my superintendent about this (his son is a Boy Scout with me) and he said that this is a very important issue. Sir Ken Robinson has delivered some great talks on that subject:

Ken Robinson | Profile on TED.com
[/quote]You’re obviously very bright and special, perhaps in a school full of overachievers, but if you want to use anecdotal evidence to argue your point, perhaps you should consider all the idiot children I’ve (and many others) watched graduate from public schools with minimal reading skills.


#16

[quote=“cynicaloptimist, post:14, topic:39760”]
I believe that with this combination of factors, added to an attitude around the school and the nation that cherishes education, public schools can be revived. Most of these factors are tied to #1 - funding is key.

[/quote]We spend three times as much in constant dollars than we did in 1970. I don’t think performance has gotten three times better. I personally don’t think it’s even gotten better, although I’m not so cynical that I believe it’s gotten much worse either. Just how much funding should a public school receive?

Free market education would tell us precisely, while government schools can never answer this question with anything except “more.”


#17

Much appreciated Pete, a day without learning a new word is like a day without orange juice.

♫ ♪

Hoplophobic

: Referring to hoplophobia, a morbid fear of guns


#18

I thought it was a fear of kangaroos…


#19

/BIG GRIN …

FC, that does make sense … lol … hoplop is sure what kanggaroos do … :smile:


#20

`
Cyn,

(and to the thread)

I know the OP is on homeschooling juxtaposed with public school, nonetheless the public schools morph into the broader subject of 21st century liberal education which includes elementary schools, high schools, colleges, and universitues.

Conservatives have had a quarrel with liberal education for years, and the quarrel has not always been from what we could call, for lack of a better phrase, the “Bob Jones University crowd.” For example, my Claremont Review Of Books that came a few days ago, featured an article by Harvey Mansfield a professor of government at Harvard University which is one of America’s most liberal universities.

Professor Manfield’s (pic here) article was titled “The Higher Education Scandal” and in the essay Mansfield discusses the Peter Wood and Michael Toscano study titled “What Does Bowdoin Teach?”

Here is Harvey Mansfield’s complete essay (its unusual for it to appear on the web this quick, but here tis):

The Higher Education Scandal | RealClearPolitics


A few excerpts from Professor Mansfield’s essay:

"Peter Wood and Michael Toscano have done just that in a comprehensive new study, “What Does Bowdoin Teach?” the first of its kind and probably destined to be the best, which shows in the practices and principles of one college what political correctness in our time has done to higher education in our country…

Today’s liberals do not use liberalism to achieve excellence, but abandon excellence to achieve liberalism. They have effectually eliminated conservatism from higher education and intimidated—“marginalized”—the few conservatives remaining. These few are the only ones in academia who think something is missing when conservatives are gone. There was a liberal president of Harvard for a brief time recently who thought something was missing when conservatives are gone, and then, courtesy of the liberals, he was gone. [Jack note: He is talking about Harvard’s former top knocker whom the bull-dyke feminists drove weeping and apologizing out of high office “Ya got till noon ta git outta Dodge” … lol … …

Liberal Clones.
The common good as practiced at Bowdoin is no longer a liberally educated student body to which the professors variously contribute but a collection of students who have individually validated the ill-considered hope of their professors to make them resemble professors like themselves …

Topical courses are featured in programs called “Studies,” such as Gender and Women’s Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies (separate from the preceding), Environmental Studies, and Africana Studies, that were founded explicitly as political advocacy for their constituents …

** Professor Mansfield Has Read His Sun Tzu **
(One has to watch their throat admist that pack of liberal wolves … lol … “homo homini lupus”)

Bowdoin’s curriculum lacks the academic standards of excellence that conservatives mostly and mainly defend in academia with little or no help these days from liberals. It is conservatives ** who deplore and resist the brazen politicization of the classroom, the loss of the great books, indeed the disregard of greatness in general, the corruption of grade inflation, the cheap satisfactions of trendiness, the mess of sexual license, the distractions of ideology, the aggrandizement and servility of administrators, the pretense and dissembling of affirmative action, the unmanly advice of psychologists, the partisan nonsense of professional associations, and the unseemly subservience everywhere to student opinion …**
[Jack note: The good Professor Mansfield is to be admired imo … lol … because in this paragraph above he was wise enough to carefully craft his sentences. We all know he was really accusing the liberals of being guilty of what I bolded red. The man has read Sun Tzu. Good.]

** “Queer gardens”: **

Facilitating this change is a new attitude among the faculty, emphasizing less what students need to know for a liberal education and more what they might want absent that discipline. Hence the arrival of many “topical” courses, as the study calls them, courses that take a current topic, such as the environment (“sustainability”) or samesexuality (my neologism), or “global citizenship,” or ** multiculturalism **, and show its relation to current research by professors of various specialties. One example, freakish but still exemplary, is a course on ** “Queer Gardens,” **which “examines the work of gay and lesbian gardeners and traces how marginal identities find expression in specific garden spaces.” It was abandoned because it got insufficient student enrollment—not because the faculty or the professor had second thoughts about this—call it odd—combination."
End quote.

Read more: The Higher Education Scandal | RealClearPolitics
Follow us: @RCP_Articles on Twitter


PS

I doubt that Conservatives will “patch it up” with the liberal education community any time soon. The situation at Bowdoin is typical, its not anecdotal.

Here is an oldie goldie, but its NOT out of date:

Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students
by Alan Bloom

Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students: Allan Bloom, Andrew Ferguson, Saul Bellow: 9781451683202: Amazon.com: Books

Bloom never was a conservative, nor was he one who wished to impose his “culture” on others. Simply put, he was a scholar who wished to make his students think - to truly think - about the nature of their existence and of society. The goal of Bloom’s book was to show how Americans of all political persuasions, social backgrounds and economic conditions are debating within a narrow modern world-view and have simply accepted as fact a mushy blend of modern theory that repeatedly contradicts itself and stands in sharp contrast to an almost entirely forgotten world of opposing thought: that of the ancients.__A Customer

Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students

I don’t have any more time to develope this furthur in this post, but there is wealth of crediable documentation that American liberal academia has gone bonkers, politically correct, chicken-defication gutless, absurd, funny, morally bankrupt, and educationless in many spots and places here in this country.
( … lol … and thats not to even get into European liberal academia …they are most likely unsalvageable)

`