How Disney’s ‘Frozen’ ruined my life

Because I’m a film critic, last fall Disney sent over an early DVD of “Frozen” — free.
Thanks, Disney! So far that freebie has cost me maybe $900.
I have two little girls, ages 6 and 2, and each of them has seen “Frozen” at least four times as many times as I ever saw “Star Wars.” The apartment is bursting with “Frozen” storybooks, “Frozen” coloring books, “Frozen” dolls, “Frozen” stickers, “Frozen” games, “Frozen” puzzles, “Frozen” costumes and “Frozen” nightgowns.

How Disney’s ‘Frozen’ ruined my life | New York Post

In the comments some of the posters raked this fella over for giving in to their children. I remember well my children when they were small and all the stuff they wanted and nowadays the grandchildren who think that if you do not buy them a game every day for their playstation they are being abused.

Back in the bad old days when a child got sent to their room there were no goodies but today those children have electronics all over the place. The grand daughter never gets off her phone, the grandson whines if he can not have a new game or get a rental.

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I liked the film. It’s not as good as Up! or Miyazaki’s Porco Rosso, but I enjoyed the self-aware deviation from the standard Disney formula. Even if the “Heel-face-turn” was a bit unearned.

Love exist in more than just the form of Romance, and I appreciate whenever the other forms get to take center-stage. Just like in DS9’s “The Visitor” or Batman: TAS’ “Paging the Crime Doctor”

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I’m afraid I’m inclined to agree with his critics. If you can’t rule your own children, what kind of a man are you?

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[quote=“Susanna, post:3, topic:44750”]
I’m afraid I’m inclined to agree with his critics. If you can’t rule your own children, what kind of a man are you?
[/quote]Certainly my view of parenting.

When my children were younger this made Christmas really hard. The advertising to spoiled children of gifts they’d use once was ceaseless.We had to persuade them that gifts were simply not part of December 25.

Do you give gifts for Hannukah? I think maybe some people do. I’m pretty sure it wasn’t in the tradition, though.

The grandchildren are told they will get only 2 toys, a book, clothes, this christmas. That’s it. They have to think what they really want or mommie and gramma do it for them.

I’m exhausted with the shopping and endless this that and the other of commercials, etc. I’m concentrating on food and fun, and decorating. I am not going to kill myself shopping.

[quote=“Susanna, post:5, topic:44750”]
Do you give gifts for Hannukah? I think maybe some people do. I’m pretty sure it wasn’t in the tradition, though.
[/quote]It’s definitely part of the “acquired tradition” because of the competition with Christmas. We have over the years deliberately made the pattern fickle so fits wouldn’t be taken for granted. And usually token as well.

Sometimes we’ll give clothing or other necessities we would have bought anyway as a “gift” but made it clear that we’re Jewish and that the gift-giving wasn’t religion.

Hard to tell if this guy is bragging or complaining, but if his attempt is at Dave Barry-style satire, he missed the boat. (Or should I say ‘yaught’?)

I didn’t get to read the comments, but if some got on him like Sam said, I can’t blame them. I mean, sheesh, the guy even has to ask why his girls would be more prone to be attracted to the self-indulgent “beyotch” rather than the self-reliant and realiable 'Anna? (Whoever that is.) Surely, the man jests.

Furthermore, I would no more support Disney than I would Target, and don’t know how any self-proclaimed Christian could do either. Not that Kyle Smith claims to be one, just speaking in general.

But while we’re on the subject, who in heaven’s name takes his 6 and 2 year olds to a dinner party? Much less indulge the whiney little brat with taking the time to retrieve a doll out of hole she shoved down int he first place?

I swear I hope the guy was making the whole thing up 'cuz no way in God’s creation would I be bragging on the fact that my 2 yr old only knew 20 words.
…or that I was such a lousy parent.

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This Jewish toystore manufacturer took his grandchildren to his warehouse one Christmeas Eve to celebrate.
One grandchild pipes up and asks, "But, Grandpapa, we’re Jewish, so why are you celebrating?"
The grandpapa answers: “Because the warehouse is empty!”

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[quote=“JBG, post:4, topic:44750”]
Certainly my view of parenting.

When my children were younger this made Christmas really hard. The advertising to spoiled children of gifts they’d use once was ceaseless.We had to persuade them that gifts were simply not part of December 25.
[/quote]When my children were young I once bought them a present that was popular then and they ended up playing more with the box it came in than the present. My wife would go garage saling and buy toys and other stuff and later the toys would end up stored so she would buy more toys.

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Disney didn’t make enough Elsa dolls, and I believe one of them sold for $1,200 on eBay. Doesn’t help that the film was released around Christmas.

Some children are selfish and want toys, but the best children I’ve seen are the ones who don’t get pleasure out of material things. Awesome kids who’d rather hang out with mom and dad at the park than play with a toy inside.

You didn’t really think that Disney comes out with movies just prior to Christmas by accident, did you? (No, I didn’t think so.)
I’m fairly certain that they know, too, just how many dolls it’ll take to satisfy the market w/o saturating it.

I’ve no problem with children hoping for wants in life. It gives me great joy to see them know how to show appreciation and get a great amount of joy, themselves, out of a gift.
I don’t go for over-indulgence, but giving children gifts they will treasure - many of which are learning tools - teaches them how to take care of their property. Plus, it gives parents and grandparents a tool with which to play with the children, either in the home or at the park. Shutes and Ladders, and kites come to mind.

[quote=“2cent, post:12, topic:44750”]
I’ve no problem with children hoping for wants in life. It gives me great joy to see them know how to show appreciation and get a great amount of joy, themselves, out of a gift.
I don’t go for over-indulgence, but giving children gifts they will treasure - many of which are learning tools - teaches them how to take care of their property. Plus, it gives parents and grandparents a tool with which to play with the children, either in the home or at the park. Shutes and Ladders, and kites come to mind.
[/quote]Just as long as the gifts are ones that are likely to see multiple uses, and that the parents can afford. Children should not be given the idea that the gifts come from “Santa Claus” since that gives no appreciation for the value of money.

Once I went to Walmart on the Saturday just after Thanksgiving. I saw a lady who obviously was not a person of means pushing a cart overflowing, over the top, with what looked like gift items. As a bankruptcy lawyer, I am quite sure she will be paying for those gifts over the next two years, with tons of interest added. Thus, unless the gifts are likely to be used again and again, and have educational or real social value they should not be given. Certainly not beyond the ability of the parents to easily repay in the January billing cycle.

:grin:

I don’t know too many kids who appreciate the value of money until their done believing in Santa Claus anyway, so I don’t see the value in that argument.
My parents allowed us the fun - and them, their help - of beliving in Santa. Didn’t seem to harm us too much. (We also celebrated the birth of Christ, so it wasn’t as if two couldn’t be enjoyed and celebrated at the same time.)

Once I went to Walmart on the Saturday just after Thanksgiving. I saw a lady who obviously was not a person of means pushing a cart overflowing, over the top, with what looked like gift items. As a bankruptcy lawyer, I am quite sure she will be paying for those gifts over the next two years, with tons of interest added. Thus, unless the gifts are likely to be used again and again, and have educational or real social value they should not be given. Certainly not beyond the ability of the parents to easily repay in the January billing cycle.

I imagine my mother didn’t look like a ‘woman of means’ when she went shopping for the 8 of us, but I know for a fact that she never went into dept over Christmas. She saved up all year long, and Christmas is when we got most of our needs, (as in sox and underwear, school supplies, etc.), and a few wants and surprises as well.

It was a tradition for us children to line up on the stairs youngest to oldest, as we waited for Mom to give the okay to come downstairs.
We’d come around the corner, cross the dining room, and
WHOA!! As you can imagine with 8 children, we could barely get IN to the living room.
Oh, and btw, while we also from time to time received sleds and bicycles, it’s also when we received our first snow shovel, so please don’t get the impression we were spoiled.
Maybe on just that one day, but certainly not throughout the rest of the year.

So no, not ALL people with baskets at Wal-Mart over-heaped with gifts go into dept, much less bankruptsy.
And it could be the lady you came across was getting her stuff out of lay-away that she’d paid on all year long.

And Santa Claus ROCKS!

[quote=“2cent, post:15, topic:44750”]
I don’t know too many kids who appreciate the value of money until their done believing in Santa Claus anyway, so I don’t see the value in that argument.
[/quote]I started getting an allowance when I was about seven. That was the start of my lesson in the proper use of money. I had stopped believing in Santa Claus a few months before I turned seven. I figured out that simultaneous deliveries of gifts to Riverdale and the Upper East Side of New York would pose difficulties.

[quote=“2cent, post:15, topic:44750”]
My parents allowed us the fun - and them, their help - of beliving in Santa. Didn’t seem to harm us too much. (We also celebrated the birth of Christ, so it wasn’t as if two couldn’t be enjoyed and celebrated at the same time.)
[/quote]Being Jewish this did not apply as much.

[quote=“2cent, post:15, topic:44750”]

I imagine my mother didn’t look like a ‘woman of means’ when she went shopping for the 8 of us, but I know for a fact that she never went into dept over Christmas. She saved up all year long, and Christmas is when we got most of our needs, (as in sox and underwear, school supplies, etc.), and a few wants and surprises as well.
[/quote]Being a bankruptcy lawyer I see life from a different angle.

[quote=“2cent, post:15, topic:44750”]

It was a tradition for us children to line up on the stairs youngest to oldest, as we waited for Mom to give the okay to come downstairs.
We’d come around the corner, cross the dining room, and
WHOA!! As you can imagine with 8 children, we could barely get IN to the living room.
Oh, and btw, while we also from time to time received sleds and bicycles, it’s also when we received our first snow shovel, so please don’t get the impression we were spoiled.
Maybe on just that one day, but certainly not throughout the rest of the year.

So no, not ALL people with baskets at Wal-Mart over-heaped with gifts go into dept, much less bankruptsy.
And it could be the lady you came across was getting her stuff out of lay-away that she’d paid on all year long.
[/quote]I hope your examples are typical. I fear that they are not.

[quote=“2cent, post:15, topic:44750”]

And Santa Claus ROCKS!
[/quote]Agreed.

Santa Claus is a relatively harmless tradition for kids. He’s based on an ACTUAL person, of course. St. Nicholas, who was in the habit of giving clothes, candy, food and treats to the poor children in his community in celebration of Christmas every year–explaining that the tradition began with the Magi bringing gifts to the Christ Child. In my opinion, ANYTHING that brings joy to children is a good thing…especially since they’re going to be adults for FAR longer than they’ll be children.

[quote=“Pappadave, post:17, topic:44750”]
Santa Claus is a relatively harmless tradition for kids. He’s based on an ACTUAL person, of course. St. Nicholas, who was in the habit of giving clothes, candy, food and treats to the poor children in his community in celebration of Christmas every year–explaining that the tradition began with the Magi bringing gifts to the Christ Child. In my opinion, ANYTHING that brings joy to children is a good thing…especially since they’re going to be adults for FAR longer than they’ll be children.
[/quote]Then for G-d’s sake teach the St. Nicholas tradition coincident with the giving of gifts. Our joyous holiday of Passover (we call it Pesach) involves the teaching of the liberation from Egypt to our children.

St. Nicholas’ tradition of giving actually began by his attempts to undo the damage done by his father, who trampled all over peoples’ lives. Traditionally, his first “giving” was to give 3 young women enough money for a dowry so they could get married (his father had been responsible for the family’s poverty, if I understood/remembered correctly). And since the giving was done around Christmas time (as I think it had happened), it began to be associated with Christmas.

“Adventures in Odyssey” - a Christian radio series - does a very humorous account of St. Nicholas, and the beginning of his gift-giving.

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Not sure where you got the story about his father, but there is no account of Nicholas’ father being ruthless or the cause of anyone’s suffering. As a matter of fact, Nicholas was born of two pious parents who died during an epidemic. There is an entire website dedicated to him:

St. Nicholas Center ::: Who is St. Nicholas?