I’m doggone sick and tired of hearing THIS about our military


#1

One of the great things about having served – or still serving — in the U.S. Military is the opportunity to show your pride in your commitment. You normally see those displays on our vehicles with bumper stickers and other symbols. I myself have bumper stickers depicting my combat tour Divisions, 1st and 4th Infantry — as well as my Paratrooper wings. On my wrists I wear the bracelets of several young men who made the last full measure of devotion in Iraq and Afghanistan. And on the other wrist, my wife Angela had my Army Master Parachutist wings cast into a bracelet.
When I’m traveling, I love to see those vets wearing hats showing their service in World War II, Korea, Vietnam and all the way to our present conflagrations.
However, now it seems that pride in military service in America can lead to targeting by Islamic terrorists.
As reported by theWashington Times, “The military command in charge of protecting the U.S. homeland has sent a message to troops, warning them to hide family information from terrorist groups that are trying to frighten them. The memo warns against using “military slang” in public and decorating a home in military items — social conduct that might make troops a target for the Islamic State, the terrorist group also known as ISIL and ISIS.”
“U.S. Northern Command sent the “official use only” message as a reaction to the Islamic State posting the names of 100 American service members as targets for attacks. “These organizations are attempting to use our own personal information against us to create fear and anxiety among our ranks and within our families,” states the message, a copy of which was obtained by The Washington Times. “We all have a responsibility to protect ourselves and our fellow service members and their families. We must reduce our vulnerabilities through active and vigilant monitoring of the information provided via the Internet and social media sources.” One of the steps being taken is to issue “media use smart cards which detail safe online practices,” according to the message sent this month from Northcom’s command center at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, to a long list of lower commands.”
One of the specific recommendations from USNORTHCOM reads, “Minimize your profile by blending into the local community. Limit outward signs of DoD affiliation … Vehicle stickers, home decorations, using military slang in public.”
So here in essence is the recommendation for our warriors and their families from USNORTHCOM, tone it down and lower your profile — hide.
And here would be my message to these savages: “**If any of you attack our military or their families here or anywhere, you will be hunted down and killed. We are currently expediting concealed weapons permits for all active duty military and their families — as well as reserve component troops on active duty. Our men and women are not targets — YOU are, and anyone providing comfort and aid to Islamic terrorists will be dealt with appropriately.”

I’m doggone sick and tired of hearing THIS about our military - Allen B. West - AllenBWest.com

I am sure obama is upset that these Muslim community organizers are treated with such **vitriol


#2

I think the idea is that ISIS was able to publish a list of over 1000 military service members and their addresses based solely from browsing the web. Even without that kind of specific threat, people should have the common sense not to put all that information out where search engines and social networks will pick it up.


#3

Wasn’t this brought up a while ago and exposed as a hoax?


#4

I don’t think Allen West was saying military personnel should continue to be unwise so much as that he thinks the government response is incomplete in ways that validate the ISIS threats and encourage them to carry out the threats.


#5

I am PROUD of my military service and wear my “Vietnam Vet” cap frequently. Any Islamic that takes exception and attacks me for it is in for a HUGE surprise.


#6

[quote=“Pappadave, post:5, topic:46499”]
I am PROUD of my military service and wear my “Vietnam Vet” cap frequently. Any Islamic that takes exception and attacks me for it is in for a HUGE surprise.
[/quote]What do you think of Jade Helm? Things are about to get much more interesting.


#7

This one is the 15th such exercise. I’m not overly concerned with it. My best friend participated in a similar exercise back in the 1960’s by parachuting into the desert at Fort Irwin, California, along with several thousand others and then simulated taking over Barstow.


#8

They carry out those types of ops yearly in the desert. The Mojave is littered with buried ordinance from Tanks to bullets.
More Chicken Little Syndrome, I think.
Hey gang, Hot piece of News: The Sky Isn’t Falling.


#9

California has a lot of desert to practice in. Camp Pendleton south of me is where a lot of the Marines train. From the 5 fwy, you can see them. One time I watched some of their amphibious exercises, like a beach invasion. They also have a mock town for the urban stuff, where you can see them running building to building.


#10

Yeah, I spent a bit of time there. You should see 29 Palms.


#11

One of our chickens earned the name Henny Penny 'cuz she goes off every time another chicken lays an egg…or some leaves fell out of a tree into the pen…or a crow showed up…
or…you name it.
Pretty hysterical. But then, she is a chicken. lol


#12

It just struck me - it wasn’t Henny Penny who worried about the falling sky (she was the one who grew the wheat and baked the bread that all the other critters wanted to share, after refusing to help her in any phase of the project); it was Chicken Little.


#13

That’s funny ^. The only I remember about my grandmother’s chickens was the rooster that was always chasing me…I hated that thing. Oh, and the Sunday chicken dinners.


#14

Maybe you should have had that rooster for one of your Sunday chicken dinners!


#15

My grandmother always threatened to boil him. He would usually perch up on the top of the chicken pen. I think she kept him around because he was like a guard dog. He would attack anything that went near the pen. She also wanted fertile eggs, to keep her hen population going.

Speaking of guard fowl, my great aunt had a turkey ranch and their guardians were two very large geese. They would even chase cars going down the driveway.


#16

Oh crud, you’re right! Poor Henny Penny! I hope we haven’t given her a complex or something. Maybe we could send her to self-esteem classes?


#17

Don’t blame ya for hating that rooster. They can be downright aggressive - along with mean, and very intimidating to youngsters. Took us a while to convince our grandson to go into our chicken pen 'cuz he got attacked. Elsewhere, I mean.

Curious why you didn’t care for the Sunday chicken dinners, though. 'Cuz they came from the back yard? Or wasn’t grandma all that good a cook? lol

We don’t have any roosters now. [Not since Gen. Custer. (The enemy.)] Didn’t buy one w/this last brood, and don’t really want one. Could change my mind if one of really good stock came along. Darn chickens are getting really expensive.

What was this thread about again? lol


#18

Didn’t mean to imply I didn’t like the chicken dinners, I loved them. I used to watch my grandmother dispatch them and pluck them. She even gave me the feet to play with. Sorry if I hijacked the thread. It’s about the military.


#19

Ah, I see. And pretty funny about you playing w/the feet. lol.

Sorry if I hijacked the thread. It’s about the military.

No sweat. I don’t believe the premise, anyway. I see lots of guys around here proudly displaying their service, and just as many (or more) thanking them for it.
My neighbor kid (kid? 22), has been serving since he was able to enter the army, is making great strides, and has every intention of making a career out of the military.

He, along w/the others I mentioned, ain’t no stinkin’ chickens!


#20

We had a mean rooster once. He attacked my sister once, and she hated him. He would chase anyone, but I’d always turn around and chase him back. Then, when I stopped chasing him, he’d crow, as if he thought he’d won. For some reason, we had a lot of pieces of corncobs lying around the place, and when he crowed, I’d throw one at him. I loved it whenever I hit him in mid-crow.

When it came his turn for the frying pan, my sister - mentioned above (who couldn’t stand to watch chickens killed) was determined that she was going to watch him being killed, and enjoy it. My father always killed chickens by chopping off their heads with a hatchet. Anyway, my sister was getting all ready to see the old rooster beheaded, but, in the end, she “chickened” out.