I think my hard drive is going


#1

I have been hearing noise and while I have a backup I stuck in thinking whether to just get a laptop or tablet. I was going to replace the motherboard and keep the peripherals but I may have to up date them as well.


#2

Probably be better just to get a new machine. Prices keep going down and power keeps going up (exponentially).

Hell, for $800 bucks or less, you can get a laptop equipped with probably a Terabyte range HDD, likely 4 to 8 GB RAM, and the very latest processor. Of course, it will be obsolete in about 6 months and you’ll probably be able to get one twice as good for only $700 bucks then.


#3

Ain’t that the way it goes! When I was planning to replace my computer, I talked to Dell about what I wanted - looked it up on their site, first. 2 gig ram, 300 gig hd - when I finally got around to ordering it - maybe a couple of months later - it was 3 gig ram, 500 gig hard drive, and I think some other goodies.


#4

Why don’t you just get a new hard drive? One problem with a new PC is that you’re gonna be stuck learning a new operating system…the sucko Windows 8.


#5

[quote=“Cam, post:4, topic:37239”]
Why don’t you just get a new hard drive?
[/quote]Yes, HDD’s are cheap these days . . . except for SSD’s. So getting a new HDD IS an option, and then you’ll have to decide if you also need to add more RAM and change the processor. If you’re hardware savvy, that all may not be too much of a hassle. But if you’re hardware challenged, like me, a new machine may be the way to go . . . hardware is compatible in these and it’s already there.

[quote=“Cam, post:4, topic:37239”]
One problem with a new PC is that you’re gonna be stuck learning a new operating system…the sucko Windows 8.
[/quote]Not necessarily. If you’re a 'nix kinda guy, you used to be able to get a Dell machine (They were doing it a few years ago . . . don’t know if they still are. Back then I don’t think any other assemblers were, but maybe others do it now too) with Ubuntu preinstalled INSTEAD of Windoze . . . thereby saving about a hundred dollars and not having to deal with Windoze. But many don’t like 'nix and favor Windoze and 'nix would maybe still be a new OS you’d have to learn, so that’s something you’ll have to figure out for yourself.

Though I’m a ‘nix kinda’ guy myself, I agree that Windoze 8 is “sucko” . . . or at least that’s what I’ve heard from my Windoze buddies.


#6

If you still have the original disks, you can just reinstall your old OS. Heck, you could even clone your old dying hard drive onto the new one in the new PC.


#7

I got a Dell with XP pre-installed when Vista was the “current” opsys.


#8

[quote=“Susanna, post:7, topic:37239”]
I got a Dell with XP pre-installed when Vista was the “current” opsys.
[/quote]As you know I build my own computers and the reason I mentioned a new one was I was thinking of a new motherboard and all it entails.

I have an old gamer board and if I change I have to go with a newer motherboard and a newer processor and ram and still allow for it being upgradable. I really do not like buying prepackaged units because they usually put the cheapest stuff in it like a low quality video card and not enough ram.

I just cloned my hard drive. I keep one on hand so I do not have to start from the beginning but it still has to be updated if I have to use it if it has been sitting for awhile.

I have been looking at new motherboards and they do not have a FDD port any more and I have a 3½ floppy I use for a software program which I would still like to use. The program has the capacity to use CD data disks but it has a nasty habit of closing out that disk which is a terrible waste.

Right now I have 4 gigs of ram with a 64bit system but it is getting old. I see they have an upgrade to windows 8 if you have XP or higher installed which is currently going for $70 and will stay on sale till Feburary.

I do not like upgrades as a rule because if the system goes down then I have to figure that in as well. Add in that all ready windows 8 seems to have bugs in it which require patches.

When I installed Vista I had to buy new peripheral equipment because there were no software updates for older equipment. That is something to consider.

I was looking at touch screen monitor the other day and they are still up in price and I am not sure I would like to have to sit up to the screen since I like to sit usually with my feet up on the feet playing with the computer as I divide my attention between it and the TV.

Speaking of Dells I have never had one but I have had to repair friend’s Dells and talk about minimal motherboards and no room for expansion; they suck. However they do come with the operating software or they used to if you have to reinstall it. Nowadays they have a partition that they claim that can be used to reinstall everything but I have never had any sucess with that.

I started cloning drives after I had a relative who wanted to reformat his system at least two to three times a year and believe me it is a pain to have to start from the beginning.


#9

sam, looks like USB-connected floppy drives are available for $20-$40. If you get a new mobo, go with one that uses polymer caps for the VRM output caps, not electrolytics. I think that is the technological trend, and the marketplace for ultra-low impedance electrolytics seems to be flooded with low-quality, short-lived crap (the things also seem to be really ticklish to make even for the best cap manufacturers). It’s weird to go to that level of detail, but choosing well could mean extra years of mobo life. And of course, cram as much memory on as you can get/afford.


#10

You’ve got floppies you can still read? I managed to read a few old ones, but even the new ones are so bad that some of them are unusable. Mike kept saving his stories to floppy, but they weren’t reliable. When I went to get him some, they didn’t have any and I got him a flash drive.


#11

[quote=“PeteS_in_CA, post:9, topic:37239”]
sam, looks like USB-connected floppy drives are available for $20-$40. If you get a new mobo, go with one that uses polymer caps for the VRM output caps, not electrolytics. I think that is the technological trend, and the marketplace for ultra-low impedance electrolytics seems to be flooded with low-quality, short-lived crap (the things also seem to be really ticklish to make even for the best cap manufacturers). It’s weird to go to that level of detail, but choosing well could mean extra years of mobo life. And of course, cram as much memory on as you can get/afford.
[/quote]I will have to look into that. A lot of the new mother boards have internal usb ports


#12

[quote=“Susanna, post:10, topic:37239”]
You’ve got floppies you can still read? I managed to read a few old ones, but even the new ones are so bad that some of them are unusable. Mike kept saving his stories to floppy, but they weren’t reliable. When I went to get him some, they didn’t have any and I got him a flash drive.
[/quote]I still have a few floppys and they work just fine and I have a relative who passed away and his sister has new floppys I can get if I need any. Just as I said, CDs will copy the data but having a CD close with data on it that is so little is wasteful.


#13

Don’t depend on new floppies. I think they sit on the shelf too long and deteriorate. I got some at Walmart and some at Staples, and many of them were bad out of the box. I can see your problem with the CD’s. But why not get a flash drive? I think you can get them as small as 2 gig; Mike’s is 4 gig, and mine is 8, because I use it for back up of everything I can’t replicate (well, most of it, anyway).


#14

[quote=“Susanna, post:13, topic:37239”]
Don’t depend on new floppies. I think they sit on the shelf too long and deteriorate. I got some at Walmart and some at Staples, and many of them were bad out of the box. I can see your problem with the CD’s. But why not get a flash drive? I think you can get them as small as 2 gig; Mike’s is 4 gig, and mine is 8, because I use it for back up of everything I can’t replicate (well, most of it, anyway).
[/quote]I have a flash drive it sets in my desk drawer keeping it warm:banana:


#15

You could get DVDs instead of CDs. They’ll hold 4.7 GB and you can buy 15 of them for like $10.


#16

[quote=“Trekky0623, post:15, topic:37239”]
You could get DVDs instead of CDs. They’ll hold 4.7 GB and you can buy 15 of them for like $10.
[/quote]It is apparent you know little about computers


#17

[quote=“PeteS_in_CA, post:9, topic:37239”]
sam, looks like USB-connected floppy drives are available for $20-$40. If you get a new mobo, go with one that uses polymer caps for the VRM output caps, not electrolytics. I think that is the technological trend, and the marketplace for ultra-low impedance electrolytics seems to be flooded with low-quality, short-lived crap (the things also seem to be really ticklish to make even for the best cap manufacturers). It’s weird to go to that level of detail, but choosing well could mean extra years of mobo life. And of course, cram as much memory on as you can get/afford.
[/quote]I have 4 gigs now of memory and when I upgrade I will be adding memory because it really helps. Back in the day of ROM memory, 512 was all one got and it filled up fast and now with programs that take megabyes to install, more memory is always good.

Heck I remember when it cost $50 for a stick of memory and turbo speed was 16 bytes.


#18

And he totally missed the point - you didn’t want to waste all that space on a CD for something that would fit on a floppy.


#19

[quote=“Susanna, post:18, topic:37239”]
And he totally missed the point - you didn’t want to waste all that space on a CD for something that would fit on a floppy.
[/quote]True. If I could get the CD to stop closing so I can put more data on it then I would gladly forgo the floppy drive. Back years ago the rescue disk was a floppy but now they use a CD or DVD. Or one can use the original to correct if possible. Some have a partition set up which one can use to rescue but it all depends if one can access the drive in the first place and that is not always possible.

This is one reason I started to clone drives and basically unplug it from the data cable and power and I would have a clean copy so I would not have to start from the beginning. If I need it all I have to do is update it and then I clone off that and use the original drive that went bad.

I tried one of those external notebook drives but I found that although it saved certain things it could not be cloned to or an operating system installed to. I had a relative who bought one for that purpose and he was told that it would do it but the salesman lied or really did not understand what was wanted. Vista onward allows one to save to a partition on the drive but the same problem arises one may not be able to access it. You can also save to other devices but then you use up disks or have to have another drive or other media such as a flash drive.

Oh another thing was when I updated my operating system my notebook would not accept it. One of my hard drives is a seagate and it came with a version of acronis which can clone among other goodies. One thing I did find out is it is better to clone to a similar or larger drive than a smaller one.

I am no expert but I have been messing around with computers since they had tape drives. I have even written two or three programs in basic, pascal, and gbasic but really none of the experience you had as a programmer.


#20

CDs will copy the data but having a CD close with data on it that is so little is wasteful.

Sorry, I didn’t understand this sentence. I thought you were complaining about the CDs being too small.

You could also get a couple of rewritable CDs for tiny, rewritable storage mediums.