In Defense Of Robert E Lee


#1

I ran across this tidbit, in an article about Robert E. Lee and thought I’d share it.

One Sunday at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, a well-dressed, lone black man, whom no one in the community—white or black—had ever seen before, had attended the service, sitting unnoticed in the last pew.

Just before communion was to be distributed, he rose and proudly walked down the center aisle through the middle of the church where all could see him and approached the communion rail, where he knelt. The priest and the congregation were completely aghast and in total shock.

No one knew what to do…except General Lee. He went to the communion rail and knelt beside the black man and they received communion together—and then a steady flow of other church members followed the example he had set.

After the service was over, the black man was never to be seen in Richmond again. It was as if he had been sent down from a higher place purposefully for that particular occasion.

Today, and deservingly so, Lee is honored throughout the country. Only Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln exceed him in monuments and memorials.

Professor Edward C. Smith is the director of American Studies at American University, Washington, D.C., and co-director of The Civil War Institute. He is a regular columnist for National Geographic News and speaker in the National Geographic Society lecture program. He also leads interpretative tours of Civil War sites and other historic locations.

Opinion: U.S. Racists Dishonor Robert E. Lee by Association


#2

The rewriting of history to portray slavery as a racist institution instead of an economic institution has certainly cast an undeserving cloud over some fine men, but I am confident that babbling, racist fools of our age that perpetuate these imbecilic revisions will not be successful against the men of strong character whom they target.

The lives of Washington, Jefferson, Lee and all the rest are more powerful from the grave than any of their racist, juvenile critics.


#3

The New York City subway system is facing the need for a major overhaul. Thread such as Governor Cuomo Ignoring Subway Disaster have discussed the problems and the finger pointing going into bringing the system up to snuff. The system in a sense is a victim of its own success. The city is gentrifying. Middle class, upper middle class and wealthy people go out at night and use the subway. The subways need upgrades to handle this new business.

So, in the latest identity politics hysteria anything looking remotely like a Confederate symbol is subject to attack. We’re removing statues of Robert E. Lee. Someone notices a tile scheme (picture below) looking a bit like the Confederate battle flag.

So what do we do? Program the removal of the “offensive” tile that had to have been installed a long time ago. And remember, NYC was never in the confederacy. See MTA to Replace Times Square Subway Tiles That Look Like Confederate Flags.

I don’t think that historical symbols such as tiling or Robert E. Lee statues are holding back minorities from producing and earning on their merits. The culture of grievance has gone way too far.

I think it’s way past time to stop relitigating a war that ended 162 years ago.

The New York City subway system is facing the need for a major overhaul. Many local paper articles have discussed the problems and the finger pointing going into bringing the system up to snuff. The system in a sense is a victim of its own success. The city is gentrifying. Middle class, upper middle class and wealthy people go out at night and use the subway. The subways need upgrades to handle this new business. So, in the latest identity politics hysteria anything looking remotely like a Confederate symbol is subject to attack. We’re removing statues of Robert E. Lee. Someone notices a tile scheme (picture below) looking a bit like the Confederate battle flag. So what do we do? Program the removal of the “offensive” tile that had to have been installed a long time ago. And remember, NYC was never in the confederacy. See MTA to Replace Times Square Subway Tiles That Look Like Confederate Flags. I don’t think that historical symbols such as tiling or Robert E. Lee statues are holding back minorities from producing and earning on their merits. The culture of grievance has gone way too far. I think it’s way past time to stop relitigating a war that ended 162 years ago.