In Memorium - Hugo Chavez


#1

He was a great man, a humble man, a man of his people. He is in the pantheon of truly commendable and decent leaders, along with Abe Lincoln, Mother Theresa, Albert Schweitzer and Jonas Salk. He delivered Venezuela into the ranks of leading and important nations.

He will long and sorely be missed. Link to article, excerpts below:

[INDENT=3]Hugo Chávez, 1954-2013
A Polarizing Figure Who Led a Movement
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[INDENT=3]CARACAS, Venezuela — Hugo Chávez, who rose from poverty in a dirt-floor adobe house to unrivaled influence in Venezuela as its president, consolidating power and wielding the country’s oil reserves as a tool for his Socialist-inspired change, died Tuesday, Vice President Nicolás Maduro said. He was 58.
Mr. Maduro said Mr. Chávez died at the military hospital in Caracas, where he had been treated for complications arising from his long struggle with cancer.

With a televangelist’s gift for oratory, Mr. Chávez led a nationalist movement that lashed out at the United States government, moneyed Venezuelans and his own disaffected followers, whom he often branded as traitors.
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[INDENT=3]In office, he upended the political order at home and used oil revenues to finance client states in Latin America, notably Bolivia and Nicaragua. Inspired by Simón Bolívar, the mercurial Venezuelan aristocrat who led South America’s 19th-century wars of independence, Mr. Chávez sought to unite the region and erode Washington’s influence.

“The hegemonic pretensions of the American empire are placing at risk the very survival of the human species,” he said in a 2006 speech at the United Nations. In the same speech he called President George W. Bush “the devil.”

For years, he succeeded in curbing American influence. He breathed life into Cuba, the hemisphere’s only Communist nation, with economic assistance; its revolutionary leader, Fidel Castro, was not only an ally but also an inspiration.

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#2

Heard about this on the radio.

By the way, doesn’t your tongue get sore in your cheek?..


#3

Sic semper tyrannis!!
now if the Hugo Chavez del Norte would follow him, oh happy day it would be!!


#4

Good riddance to a monster! Sadly for the people of Venezuela it’s more like, “The Monster is dead. Long live the Monster!”


#5

Would those of you condemning him equally condemn the US presidents and institutions that have since the Cold War installed, propped up, and aided various Latin American dictators as well as arming/aiding terrorist groups there?

RIP


#6

[quote=“Volk, post:5, topic:38550”]
Would those of you condemning him equally condemn the US presidents and institutions that have since the Cold War installed, propped up, and aided various Latin American dictators as well as arming/aiding terrorist groups there?

RIP
[/quote]You mean lke the russians do?


#7

Yes I would. I would hope you would for your government too.


#8

Yea, like every powerful nation has and will do forever. I was just curious.

Realpolitik is the way of the world, it’s only recently that governments have had start trying to mask their power-maximising intentions with ethical/idealist reasons for whatever it is they are doing. I mean, I can certainly call actions immoral but I don’t know if I would condemn a government for putting its own national interests first, even at the expense of other nations, if the alternative is to allow a threat to national security to grow.

Oh and I hope it wasn’t you guys secret services who gave Chavez cancer, as the Venezuelan government is now alleging- think of your own assassination methods, copycats. (Litvinenko)


#9

Dear Hugo…rot in hell you murderous scum sucking parasite.:devil:


#10

BTW, today was a rather appropriate day for Chavez to die, the 60th anniversary of Stalin’s death.


#11

He did do some good towards the beginning of his tenure, but I think his ego was just way too big and he became too enamored with his own self-image and power than helping his people.


#12

As the saying goes. “Power corrupts.”


#13

Lord Acton’s saying is justly famous (and I know I’ve quoted it more than a few times), but it puts the blame on power,. Power isn’t of itself corrupt or corrupting. It would be more accurate to say that power provides opportunity for people’s characters to be revealed. A decent person will most likely use power decently. A corrupt person will misuse power, in proportion to their character and the degree of opportunity (degree of power). Maybe a quotable aphorism could describe that, but my brain isn’t up to that task this AM.

At any rate, I’m not aware that Chavez was a monster on the scale of Pol Pot or Castro, but they weren’t/aren’t exactly standards of excellence. And maybe he was, but our MSM are showing the kind of incuriosity they did for Stalin, Mao and Castro.


#14

Not really sure you can put Chavez or Even Castro as comparable to Pol Pot or Stalin… Now I’m not gonna sit here and say their hands are clean, but really, aside from being left wing revolutionaries they’re not similar at all. In terms of being a “monster” Chavez and Castro shouldn’t even be mentioned in the same breath as Pol Pot. There are definite human rights abuses on Castro’s side, but he also did a lot of good for Cuba. Pol Pot murdered a third of his population.


#15

Twenty seven thousand murders in Venezuela last year, in a Country of 29 million.
Store shelves bare of commodities due to high prices when taxes added on.
Commodities readily available on black market.
The Chavez family has accumulated almost two billion dollars during Chavez’s reign.
Chavez’s opponnets who threatened in the polls falsely charged, framed, convicted, and sent to prison.
Like Obama, Chavez exploited the poor while showing a facade of trying to help them.
Chavez is in a place where he will smell sulpher for a long long time, OH Happy Day!!!:banana:


#16

I imagine that of those in the USA that support or approve of Chavez, have ever had to live under his dictates.

So, Sean Penn falls apart, thinks Chavez is a great man. I’d like to hear him sing those praises after giving up his wealth, and living amongst the oppressed in Chavez’s regime. Are you gonna sing his praises when your not a tool, fool?


#17

[quote=“Fantasy_Chaser, post:2, topic:38550”]
Heard about this on the radio.

By the way, doesn’t your tongue get sore in your cheek?..
[/quote]Never. Chavez was a true man of the people of the world.

Mao Mao Mao Tse Tung!


#18

Sums it up.


#19

He was a typical Socialist who created typical Socialists results in the nation that was dumb enough to tolerate his leadership, pretty run of the mill really. Bloodshed and poverty follow the Left, there are no exceptions so history will remember Hugo Chavez will a big yawn or a DUH!


#20

[quote=“Choobear, post:14, topic:38550”]
Not really sure you can put Chavez or Even Castro as comparable to Pol Pot or Stalin… Now I’m not gonna sit here and say their hands are clean, but really, aside from being left wing revolutionaries they’re not similar at all. In terms of being a “monster” Chavez and Castro shouldn’t even be mentioned in the same breath as Pol Pot. There are definite human rights abuses on Castro’s side, but he also did a lot of good for Cuba. Pol Pot murdered a third of his population.
[/quote]I’ve never understood the reasoning that the number killed defines the “monsterhood” of the subject.

Someone once said, “When you kill 1 man, it is a tragedy. When you kill 10 million, it is a statistic.” So what if it’s 500 versus 5 MILLION . . . does that make it any less heinous or does that somehow make the monster less of a monster?