Is obesity the future of humanity?

Unfortunately a lot of people today worldwide are fat. Let’s face it. The world isn’t the skinny paradise it used to be. I want to also say that I don’t want a nanny state telling anybody of us what to eat. But I think humanity’s future is a sad thing with the rise of obesity. It’s just not attractive either.

What is your proposed non-government solution to obesity? The only answer I know that I can accept the government doing is imposing a unified excise on junk foods and maybe sodas. I think excise taxation is less evil than most other taxation. But even that might not be effective at all. It might have even been tried before and was unsuccessful.

Dr Oz has a natural supp that blocks fat and causes weight loss naturally. I know people that have lost 20 pounds in a month doing everything they usually do without changing eating habits. It’s worth researching.

Sooo, your NOT a chubby chaser?

Maybe taxation by the pound? Rebates for weight lost?

On OZ and others…Supplements as natural weight loss. Isn’t that kinda oxymoronic? Oh yeah, that’s right, a supplement along with diet and exercise. So what is causing the weight loss, the supplements or the diet and exercise? Next?

I think health consciousness will naturally come to people. Sure, more people are obese today - but that’s their choice. And someday they’ll pay for that choice… the real BIG problem now, though, is the ACA will make those that made healthy decisions all their life pay for all those that didn’t.

Socializing healthcare will make the “cost” for eating yourself into obesity less.

But in the end, forgetting money and ACA, I find obesity (the social problem, not the genetic problem) to be the unfortunate sign of an overly content, lazy, and disengaged people.

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[quote=“WhoIsJohnGalt, post:4, topic:44065”]
I find obesity to be the unfortunate sign of an overly content, lazy, and disengaged people.
[/quote]I agree with that in general . . . indeed, the stereotypical couch potato fits that mold.

But there are a few whose metabolism predisposes them to obesity, and they are perpetually struggling with the problem. And I have found those people very active and engaged.

Nevertheless, I DO think your evaluation of the situation is, for the most part, accurate.

AND, the impact of the ACA, as you say, is severe on those that “watch their weight”. A penalty, if you will, for eating healthy and exercising.

I myself don’t exercise as much as I should, though the physical disability has a lot to do with that. So, to compensate some for that, I eat much less than I used to when I exercised more. And, for several years I adhered to the Adkins lifestyle (it’s NOT a diet, and if you look on it as such you’ll quickly fail) and that brought me down to where I should be, and just by eating smaller portions and with some common sense, I haven’t had a problem with weight.

Here’s a tip for those like me that now lead a “low-energy” lifestyle: PUT THE FORK DOWN!!!

At first, that might seem like needless suffering if you like food as much as I do. But if you stick with it, it soon becomes habit, and small portions of “gourmet” food can be very satisfying. Use the freezer too.

And as far as “remedies”, which supposedly allow you to eat anything you want and as much as you want (Adkins will allow you to eat more, but it is not just anything), you’re fooling yourself. The health impact of those “remedies” alone is not good. Nothing is for free . . . there is always a hidden cost if you try to trick the physical laws.

Absolutely, you’re right. I know at least 2 people that suffer obesity genetically. My statements above should have been a bit more clearly distinguished as comments on society’s obesity problem – which would never be a problem if the only obesity were due to genetics.

Glad you reminded me. I just started the Adkins system 3 weeks ago. I have to remind myself that portions can be large - just balanced and low on carbs. I need this to counteract my lack of time for good exercise.

[quote=“WhoIsJohnGalt, post:6, topic:44065”]
Glad you reminded me. I just started the Adkins system 3 weeks ago. I have to remind myself that portions can be large - just balanced and low on carbs
[/quote]Tiny is the pro on that. If you have any questions on that LIFESTYLE, I’m sure that if you PM him, he’ll be glad to answer them and share his tips.

Plus, I think somewhere here there’s a whole thread on Atkins recipes (I sometimes spell it with a “d”, but the “t” is correct). Tiny has a bunch, and I think CT may be trying some too.

It’s been a while for me, but I remember the first few weeks, where you get yourself into ketosis (I think), were the hardest. After that, it’s pretty easy.

Nothing forces or impels people to suck down a 64oz. Super Big Gulp and scarf down a bag of snack chips every day or regularly consume a plate of spaghetti large enough to be 3 good-sized meals or … . Nor to spend spare every spare minute in front of a computer or watching inane sitcoms (“Oooo! ‘My Mother the Car’! I Love Jerry Van Dyke!”). BTDT, had the XXL T-shirts. People like me who live that way - admittedly I over-stated it a bit as to my habits - do so consciously. They aren’t thinking, “I’m going to slurp and scarf my way to a heart attack before age 50,” but they know their eating and movement habits have them heading that way.

The people of the US are not homogeneous, regionally or among ethnic/national subcultures. Here in Silicon Valley, at public places where lots of people gather (e.g. malls, churches, restaurants, stores) people of all sorts of shapes can be seen. You can occasionally see really obese people who slowly waddle or roll along; you can see lots of people of apparently reasonably healthy weight. Whether this state of things is worse, better, or about the same as 20 or 40 years ago, I can’t say. I wasn’t very conscious of it until fairly recently. I know what the stats say, but the standards for what constitutes “overweight” and “obese” have been changing, I think past data was very incomplete, and I think there’s been more than a little agenda-driven crisis-hype the past several 5 or 10 years.

The past several years I’ve been eating less and more intelligently and moving more. And in paying attention to myself, people around me have become more noticeable. Among the things I’ve noticed is that quite a few people are doing healthy things. I go to the gym several days a week, and I also do long walks on nearby trails (I did ~8 miles in ~2 hours yesterday). Even at the gym you see a pretty wide cross-section of people - various ethnic backgrounds, ages from teeny something (and younger on the trails) to 70- or 80-somethings (may be nonagenarians?), runners I could imagine being competitive in half marathons, marathons and triathlons, body-builder types who are close to looking extreme, overweight and obese people doing what they can and working to be able to do more. Being in good shape doesn’t make one a good person (nor does being fat make one a bad person), but at least healthy people are usually around long enough to learn what being a good person means and try to be one (hopefully).

I’m pretty sure there is a solid proportion of people in the US who make eating sensibly and enjoying physical activity part of their lifestyle, so I don’t think the US is headed toward a state where a few elite look like Luke Skywalker or Princess Leia while the rest of us look like Jabba the Hutt.

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Even though there is political correctness in getting people to “eat better”, I’m beginning to see the complete opposite too…
What do you think?

I think it’s a problem better left unsolved than for government to “solve” it for us. That way lies control and tyranny.

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[quote=“BobJam, post:7, topic:44065”]
Tiny is the pro on that. If you have any questions on that LIFESTYLE, I’m sure that if you PM him, he’ll be glad to answer them and share his tips.

Plus, I think somewhere here there’s a whole thread on Atkins recipes (I sometimes spell it with a “d”, but the “t” is correct). Tiny has a bunch, and I think CT may be trying some too.

It’s been a while for me, but I remember the first few weeks, where you get yourself into ketosis (I think), were the hardest. After that, it’s pretty easy.
[/quote]Thanx for the accolades, but I must state emphatically, that Maylar has taught me a great deal about low carb dieting.
Now, having lost 115 lbs, I can safely say that I do understand and will help as much as anyone needs.
I do have a few tricks. Please, if anyone needs my help, just whistle.:whistle:

You ask for a non-government solution, then give a government solution.

NO! NO government solutions!

The solution is easy. Less input; more output.

If others are fat, that’s their problem, not my problem. I won’t be paying for their obesity, and I don’t expect anyone to pay for my health care needs, say, from smoking, or other bad habits I may have.
(Actually, I kinda have to pay for their obesity because my and your taxes pay for their food stamps.)

Obamacare? Pffft. That garbage needs to be kicked to the curb, as we all know.
I, for one, refuese to be any part of it. If more of us did, it’d go away on its own.

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Not all that long ago, overweight women were considered the most desirable. Tastes change. No government has any business telling people what they should look like or what they should be eating. Period.

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How about we don’t create a cluster**** and just get rid of corn subsidies? It’d do the same thing, raise the cost of junk food.

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Thank you!
Heck, I don’t even considerate it any of my business if my own sister or brother are overweight.
My grown children? Not beyond care and concern. Shucks, what concerns me is the fact that my daughter can’t seem to gain wieght. But in either case, over or under, it’s ciertainly none of my business to tell them what to eat.
Strangers? Now that would be really over the top none of my business, no matter what I think of it. Besides, I’m a little too busy watching my own weight.

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[quote=“Dolphin_Cry, post:1, topic:44065”]
Unfortunately a lot of people today worldwide are fat. Let’s face it. The world isn’t the skinny paradise it used to be. I want to also say that I don’t want a nanny state telling anybody of us what to eat. But I think humanity’s future is a sad thing with the rise of obesity. It’s just not attractive either.

What is your proposed non-government solution to obesity? The only answer I know that I can accept the government doing is imposing a unified excise on junk foods and maybe sodas. I think excise taxation is less evil than most other taxation. But even that might not be effective at all. It might have even been tried before and was unsuccessful.
[/quote]Hmm…in one breath you oppose the nanny state and then promote it in the next paragraph really? Sin taxes are abhorrent things.

The fat guy down the street isn’t your concern, yet you propose using the nanny state to modify his behavior. That’s sad and just unattractive.

[quote=“WhoIsJohnGalt, post:4, topic:44065”]
I think health consciousness will naturally come to people. Sure, more people are obese today - but that’s their choice. And someday they’ll pay for that choice… the real BIG problem now, though, is the ACA will make those that made healthy decisions all their life pay for all those that didn’t.

Socializing healthcare will make the “cost” for eating yourself into obesity less.

But in the end, forgetting money and ACA, I find obesity (the social problem, not the genetic problem) to be the unfortunate sign of an overly content, lazy, and disengaged people.
[/quote]A fairly recent study showed that smokers and fat folks cost less for healthcare in the long run. They die younger and deal with fewer health problems in that last 10 to 15 years of life that skinny nonsmokers will have. It’s just not a “public” health issue. It’s a “personal” health issue, and we should avoid giving ammunition to the nanny staters. We should actively deny them this argument because it is total bunk. Unfortunately, it didn’t play well in the mainstream news, which is obsessed with health and a strong, centralized government that manipulates behavior and economics.

If you’d like a link, I can dig it out. There’s already links here on this site and should be easy to search.

Socializing healthcare won’t make ANYTHING cost less…period. On the contrary, as we’ve seen over the past 50 years, government involvement in the healthcare system is responsible for exponential rises in the cost of healthcare…period. I generally agree with your posts, but this one is off-base by a mile. I’m getting pretty sick and tired of people who don’t live with me, know NOTHING about me, and who, insofar as my lifestyle is concerned, don’t know “Come here” from “Sic 'em” trying to tell me how I should live my life, what I should and shouldn’t eat and drink, whether or not I should smoke. It’s NOT anyone else’s business!!! IF I choose what you may think of as an “unhealthy” lifestyle, the only one hurt is ME–and I’ll likely die early, “sparing you” the cost of my healthcare…not to mention never drawing down all that I’ve contributed to Medicare and Social Security. In short, YOU (the generic “you”) need to mind your OWN business and stay out of anyone else’s.

I have said this before and will gladly repeat it again, It is not the food that makes one fat, it is not the quality or lack thereof, of what we eat that makes us fat. It is the inactivity. The laziness, the slothfulness. My grandmother [mothers side] was Pennsylvania Dutch and really cooked with fats lard, butter, roasting, broiling, frying they were not fat, they were active. outside doing things, not playing 24/7 on their Ipods computers etc

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True. And, on the other hand, some people are simply pre-disposed to store fat…particularly those who genetically come from subsistence-level societies. No matter HOW much exercise one does, they store fat. At the same time, there are people who drink whole milk, Coke and Pepsi by the gallon, and for whom a “piece of pie” means a whole pie!

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You won’t store fat if you burn all the calories you put into your body each day. It’s not rocket science.