Is the flu shot really just a flu shot?


#1

For the past few years, I have noticed the flu shot being pushed everywhere. Okay, at first it was just at the doctor’s office, but they were annoyingly insistent. Then you could get the flu shot in the drugstore, then the grocery store. Now there is a report from “scientists” claiming your unborn child will develop schizophrenia if you don’t get the flu shot while pregnant. If the flu shot was really just a flu shot, then why this sudden insistence. If I want a flu shot, I know where to get one. Why keep pushing it?


#2

The insistence probably stems from the constructed controversy over the MMR vaccine, which has caused celebrities like Jenny McCarthy to tell parents to avoid all vaccines. Purposefully deciding not to get a vaccine destroys herd immunity, and puts those who don’t have an immunity to a disease at risk, hence the insistance to get a vaccine or flu shot.


#3

If I had to hazard a guess I’d say to prevent people from getting the flu.


#4

I haven’t ever had a flu shot, and I haven’t had any kind of flu in probably 15 years.


#5

I had the flu once when I was 8. Then again immediately following my first and only flu shot. It lasted 2 weeks and it supposedly was a dose so small that it couldn’t be contagious, though my kids all got it, and my husband, too.


#6

If I had to hazard a guess I’d say to prevent people from getting the flu.

Then your guess would be wrong considering it is a dose of the flu virus. The first season it was available everywhere, many people complained of having the flu despite having the vaccine.


#7

That’s how vaccine’s work.

Also, you can have the flu three days before you start showing symptoms. A vaccine doesn’t do anything if you already have the disease.


#8

Plus there are multiple strains of the flu, that’s why it comes back year after year, flu shots try to guard against the most common strains in given year.


#9

My ex was required to have a flu shot when he worked at a hospital. He was sick more then than he ever was.


#10

Honestly, it probably also had to do with working in a building of sick people. No offense.


#11

He was a grounds keeper. He would have spent little time in the hospital itself.


#12

The people who develop the flu vaccine have no real idea of what type of flu they’re going after. It’s literally a shot in the dark. They GUESS.
Yes, based on given probabilities, but it’s still a guess.

Never had the flu shot. Never had the flu. My husband, and 2 (then) young children contracted the flu once. I nursed them around the clock for 2 days straight, and then some.
Still didn’t get the flu.

They never had the flu shot, either. Don’t know how they came down with it. School is my best guess.


#13

[quote=“Robert_Clay, post:3, topic:39463”]
If I had to hazard a guess I’d say to prevent people from getting the flu.
[/quote]You’d be wrong. It is about fees, and costs. They charge a fee to administer the shot, and pay the pharmco for the vaccine. Easy to convince people to get one. Easy cash.


#14

Really? My flu shots are free…thinks well for me, someone is probably getting paid. They’ve always worked for me, haven’t gotten the flu in five years.


#15

I haven’t gotten the flu in 10 or 15 years, and I’ve never had a flu shot.


#16

Typical liberal mindset.
No, they are not free. Someone gets paid for the vaccine. They do not give it away. Someone gets paid to administer the shot. No one works for free. Well, maybe at a free clinic, somewhere, but their subsidies cover it.
And maybe without the shot, you’d not have gotten it either. Some people have a higher resistance. My daughter has never had a flu shot, and has never had much more than the sniffles. She is 24.


#17

Nope I defiantly paid for it, part of the “student health fee” in my tuition (I’ve been reviewing my finacnes…depressing).


#18

[quote=“Robert_Clay, post:17, topic:39463”]
Nope I defiantly paid for it, part of the “student health fee” in my tuition (I’ve been reviewing my finacnes…depressing).
[/quote]Then how is it free?


#19

Well, for one, since he paid for it as a package deal of student health care, there’s no incentive for them to sell him a flu shot, as many seemed to indicate might be the case. I think that’s what he’s trying to get out here. He didn’t pay for the flu shot—he paid for health care and was still encouraged to get a flu shot.


#20

I think he recanted that statement.