James Gandolfini has died


#1

The actor James Gandolfini died suddenly in Italy after a suspected heart attack. He was 51. Gandolfini will be forever known for his portrayal of mob boss Tony Soprano on the seminal HBO series The Sopranos, which won him three Emmy Awards.

James Gandolfini Dies – ‘Sopranos’ Star Was 51

(Don’t run to the site just yet!)

BAD @$$ VIDEO!

Alabama 3 “Woke Up This Morning” (Sopranos Theme Song) Live

[video=youtube_share;3edGUEBL3Tg]http://youtu.be/3edGUEBL3Tg[/video]

Alabama 3 “Woke Up This Morning” (Sopranos Theme Song) Live (HD, Official) - YouTube


#2

Oh woah.


#3

The female in the group has one b!tch!n voice!:grin:


#4

Well, he certainly played scumbag criminals well enough.

I know absolutely nothing of him as a person. That is just fine, I prefer to not know what kind of people actors are. I don’t watch movies where the stars are vocal big stinking flaming liberals.


#5

The scenes he had in True Romance were great. He was a fine actor.


#6

Maybe he was a good actor, I can’t judge because I didn’t watch the Sopranos. Unlike most Americans, I don’t idolize criminals, which is what the show did.


#7

Which know because you watched it… oh wait


#8

I just read that he’s been on several USO tours to see the troops.

That is something most certainly positive.


#9

[quote=“natstew, post:6, topic:39878”]
Maybe he was a good actor, I can’t judge because I didn’t watch the Sopranos. Unlike most Americans, I don’t idolize criminals, which is what the show did.
[/quote] So no Goodfellas, Casino, Scarface, Taxi Driver, Boardwalk Empire, Public Enemies, James Cagney/Bogart Gangster movies(White Heat, The Public Enemy, The Roaring 20’s, Little Ceasar)? No gangster action or Gangster drama’s at all eh? Shame, you’re missing out.


#10

They did not glorify the Mafia.

Tony was a ruthless scumbag when dealing with friends and family, very little redeeming elements were portrayed. What made this show unique was the lack of glamor it portrayed of those who live on the grift and how cutthroat it all is even within “family”.

Gandolfini portrayed a neurotic and delusional character who saw himself as a great General keeping the vitally important “old ways” alive while lamenting how others had abandoned the family integrity. Nobody else saw him this way largely because He was as guilty or more so of breaking all the “rules” and served nothing greater than himself.

It was a great show in how it portrayed the political infighting and outward interactions with mainstream politicians, businessmen and bureaucrats with all the “warts” intact. Great acting and writing but none better than Gandolfini.

You don’t come away from this series with a sympathetic view of organized crime, if anything you come away with a greater disgust of civic leaders and the “system” that allows organized crime to thrive.

I also don’t know Gandolfini’s politics and I hope I don’t find out, I would hate for one of the few classic series that I admire to become tainted by finding out the cornerstone of the series was a Leftist.

RIP James Gandolfini, you left a masterpiece and many honorable mentions in your short time here.


#11

Exactly, Tony Soprano had panic attacks, wife left him, kids hated him, uncle shot him, and he dies at the end. What is so glamorous about that?


#12

Hey (UNTRugby), I checked it out and didn’t like the message it was sending to young impressionable minds so I didn’t watch it anymore.


#13

Considering that the show was intended for adults the only young impressionable minds seeing it are the ones with bad parents


#14

Are you serious? …or just naive?


#15

[quote=“natstew, post:14, topic:39878”]
Are you serious? …or just naive?
[/quote] You have something against programming with mature content for adults? I personally never got into that show although the subject matter is interesting to me(Organized crime, the mob, the mafia) What’s the problem? It would be a very dull world if all entertainment was PAX quality.


#16

“children might see it” would apply to all intended for adult content, do you not watch any R rated movies?


#17

Natstew, Seems that you would be a fan of reinstating the Hays code of 1930 in which our government was legislating morality for the viewing public. The code stated that

1.** No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.
**
2. Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.

  1. Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

Particular Applications


#18

Finally some closure. The original ending sucked.


#19

I’ve tried to resist; truly I have. But I just can’t seem to help myself.

Thanks for confirming why I knew Rush Limbaugh loved that show.

It was a great show in how it portrayed the political infighting and outward interactions with mainstream politicians, businessmen and bureaucrats with all the “warts” intact. Great acting and writing but none better than Gandolfini.

You don’t come away from this series with a sympathetic view of organized crime, if anything you come away with a greater disgust of civic leaders and the “system” that allows organized crime to thrive.

I also don’t know Gandolfini’s politics and I hope I don’t find out, I would hate for one of the few classic series that I admire to become tainted by finding out the cornerstone of the series was a Leftist.

RIP James Gandolfini, you left a masterpiece and many honorable mentions in your short time here.

I tried to watch a few times. Found it lame and drastically boring.


#20

Not that I ever watched this show, but for those who are interested, this was at reason on Gandolfini and “The Sopranos”

James Gandolfini, RIP: How Tony Soprano Changed American Culture - Reason.com

Tony in particular represents a character who draws immense power from his ethnic heritage - not just a cultural identity in terms of tastes in clothing and food, but a line of work that is inextricably linked to his being Italian American. Yet even as that identity confers great power on Tony, it paralyzes him and his family from actually moving into anything like a sustainable future. Despite being able to squeeze out a living by using brute force, the show makes clear that in the long run, it’s over for the Mob - in one telling incident, two of Tony’s goombahs try to shake down a new Starbucks franchise for protection money. They’re told that since all decisions are made by corporate bean-counters in Seattle, there’s no way the manager can give them anything. Even the straws and coffee stirrers are accounted for, the manager explains. The disappointed gangsters walk out of the franchise muttering that the small independent guy can no longer make a living. At the series’ start, Tony had hoped that his children would not follow him into organized crime. By the ambiguous end of the series, that seems unlikely, even as it consigns his kids - with the non-ethnic names Meadow and A.J. - to a dark life.

On a more basic level, Tony’s inability to move beyond a tightly limited cultural identity is the cause of his panic attacks and need to see a shrink (who is another Italian American who has managed to transition more successfully into an America that is more accepting of wops, dagos, and every other type of ethnic). Given its weekly comment on the persistence and pathology of attempts to maintain fixed ethnic identity in a post-ethnic America, it’s no accident that The Sopranos dominated pop culture just as the Census allowed respondents to categorize themselves as “multiracial.” As such, The Sopranos both reflected and informed conversations well underway in a decade that would see the first African American elected as president of the United States.