Judge Grants Reprieve To Student Expelled For Refusing To Wear Tracking Device Badge


#1

Andrea Hernandez won’t have to leave her high school for refusing to wear a badge designed to track her every move there – yet – her attorneys announced today.

A district court judge for Bexar County, Texas, has granted a temporary restraining order to prevent Northside Independent School District from removing a Hernandez from John Jay High School’s Science and Engineering Academy because she refused to wear a name badge designed to use a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chip to track students’ precise location on school property, the Hernandez’s attorneys announced today.

Judge Grants Reprieve To Student Expelled For Refusing To Wear Tracking Device Badge | CNS News

I am reminded of the story of a school that had given computers to the students but what the students did not know there was spyware on those computers.

Did School Spy on Kid at Home via Webcam? - CBS News

Can any one envision 1984

Nineteen Eighty-Four - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


#2

I “get” that PSs have to do their part in controlling truancy and that they get their state and federal $$ on an ADA (Average Daily Attendance) basis. OTOH, I’m also painfully aware that PSs are motivated by ADA $$ to abuse truancy laws to attack homeschooling (and if successful, what form of private schooling comes into PSs’ cross-hairs next?). But tracking where a student is while on campus? How is this better than attendance-taking and absence-tracking using computer SW that lets adminicrats know which students are on campus and which are absent (something many/most schools probably already can do)? And if accounting for students in the event of emergency is part of the purpose, having teachers being responsible for their classes and having designated assembly areas (as businesses do) should suffice.

I really do not see how these RFID tags serve any function schools do not already have simpler, less expensive and less intrusive means to accomplish.


#3

I think the courts will find in favor of the school ultimately. There is a long history granting schools the right to do all sorts of things in the name of good order as long as there is a legitimate administrative purpose despite the fact that outside of school these would be constitutional violations.
The alternative IS home schooling or private school…or enough ticked off parents to vote the school board out.


#4

I think the courts will find in favor of the school ultimately. There is a long history granting schools the right to do all sorts of things in the name of good order as long as there is a legitimate administrative purpose despite the fact that outside of school these would be constitutional violations.

Dunno, Cam. I don’t see a legitimate interest that is not satisfiable as or more easily, less expensively and less intrusively by other means the school already has or could easily obtain.

The alternative IS home schooling or private school…

Our family homeschooled our munchkins and I attended a private school for Grades 1-3, so I whole-heartedly agree. BUT the latter is not cheap (especially when you pay property taxes, etc. that support PSs at the same time - whether directly or figured into the rent for your home), and the former becomes your lifestyle (single income or second job/income after the first first income earner comes home).

…or enough ticked off parents to vote the school board out.

The critical mass for that is more difficult to obtain than you might imagine. Teacher’s unions run slates of puppet candidates and fund their campaigns to a degree an ordinary citizen cannot match. Need I point out that the teachers’ puppets are unlikely to fight against extensions of school such as this (unless it became a bargaining chip in a contract negotiation)?


#5

I expect that, as Cam says, the courts would side with the school district ultimately. The standard they generally impose is not one of efficiency, nor even appropriateness and proportionality, but one of reasonableness. It’s tough to say such devices cannot be considered reasonable, given the school district’s responsibility for the care and safe-keeping of children.

That being said, I find the whole thing to be just another example of schools failing to do what they know works in the teaching (and monitoring and control) of students while preferring a technological solution that, while it does nothing to improve the situation, gives cover to institutions who can them claim to have done something. I mean, what exactly are we to think of, or expect of, a school that cannot seem to keep track of its students and their activities absent electronic tracking means?

We’ve halved the classroom size, while faculty and staff have both grown, and we cannot keep track of students? I think these are the same people who ascribe Johnny’s lack of reading skills to insufficient access to computers. “Educators” are people uniquely qualified in ascertaining the latest politically correct threat to their charges that does not involve actually educating them.


#6

Throwing $$ at a problem - real or imagined - and grabbing more power rather than making full/proper use of entirely adequate existing means is something bureaucrats and educrats love doing. And as long as they get slices of the new $$ and power pies, union thugs will fully support it.


#7

Yeah…that is a stumbling block…BUT… I have seen an 1/2 board voted out due to not permitting the local youth soccer leagues access to their fields. Hasn’t again been a problem in over 15 years! Probably a bit more difficult in CA. :frowning:


#8

Student Kicked Out Of School For Refusing To Wear RFID Tracking Badge Following Failed Appeal
By Craig Bannister
CNSNews.com
1/18/13

Having lost her appeal, 15 year-old student Andrea Hernandez is leaving John Jay High School after school officials denied her request to allow her to continue her “education uninterrupted” by permitting her to use her old (chipless) ID badge which “does not signify participation in a program which I believe conflicts with my religious beliefs.”

Normally I’d say that Ms. Hernandez should try being homeschooled, but, historically at least, Whitehead and The Rutherford Institute have been less than sympathetic to homeschooling.