Liberated Iraq calls on Arab states to use oil as 'weapon' against U.S.


#1

[LEFT]A top Iraqi diplomat urged Arab states to “use the weapon of oil” against the United States because of its alliance with Israel, raising more questions about the Middle Eastern nation’s allegiance to the country that freed it from a ruthless dictatorship.
The shocking statement from a democratic government in power only after the U.S. and allies ousted murderous dictator Saddam Hussein in a costly and bloody war laid bare the Middle Eastern nation’s true allegiance.
“Iraq will invite (Arab) ministers to use the weapon of oil, with the aim of asserting real pressure on the United States and whoever stands with Israel,” Qais al-Azzawy told reporters in Cairo on Friday.

**Read more: **Liberated Iraq calls on Arab states to use oil as ‘weapon’ against U.S. | Fox News

**Should we have left Saddam in power?
**[/LEFT]


#2

Meet the new boss… same as the old boss


#3

The majority of people in many nations, especially where nationalist sentiment is strong, would rather have a dictator and stable situation in the country than foreign intervention and invasion and everything that comes with it for the sake of “democracy”. What the article calls “liberation” is not going to be perceived as such by people on the side that has been enduring war and random terrorist attacks ever since the invasion.


#4

Maybe we shouldn’t have “liberated” them.


#5

All the world is full of maybes. There is always someone blowing smoke.


#6

And in this case it is the Iraqi government.


#7

I say offer any non-muslim asylum in the US, allow them time to get out, pull out our troops and leave them to feed upon themselves.

I’m sick of ingrates, domestic and abroad.


#8

I believe we should’ve stayed out of Iraq entirely, it’s not our job to spread freedom in foreign lands but to preserve it here. Yes, Saddam was dictator and a thug, but Bush wanted to finish his daddy’s work and I’m pretty sure he didn’t give two squats about spreading democracy.

I’m also pretty sure that the Arab nations would never do this, ever. The US is becoming more dependent on oil imports and that means it’ll sell. Those countries in the Middle East can become richer than rich. Especially Saudi Arabia. However, they could threaten to freeze oil imports if they don’t get their way, it may have pull with D.C. Who knows?


#9

[quote=“Conservative_Libertarian, post:7, topic:37158”]
I say offer any non-muslim asylum in the US, allow them time to get out, pull out our troops and leave them to feed upon themselves.

I’m sick of ingrates, domestic and abroad.
[/quote]I am sure early on most people knew that what ever government was put it that it would be corrupt and work against us. They want our money and some security while still sheltering enemy combatants. Look at Pakistan for example or for that matter Afghanistan and Iraq.

Pakistan harbored Bin Laden and even worked against our interest on other fronts. Afghanistan both have governments that want to shelter the enemy. In Iraq we would capture combatants and they would let them go.

So while all this is going on Obama is sending money to rebuild Mosques and now $6 billion for Muslim green projects. Obama is letting terrorists go who return to fight us and some question if he is a Muslim, I think it is plain to see that he is.

We have radical Muslims in Washington deciding policy.


#10

You can’t force democracy on another people through force and you can’t spread democracy to a people that don’t understand basic concepts such as the rights to life, liberty, and property.

Actually, we produce most do the oil we consume and our largest oil trade partners are Canada and Mexico.

http://www.window.state.tx.us/specialrpt/energy/nonrenewable/images/exhibit4-21.png


#11

I agree with your first point. I also should thank you for informing me of where we get our oil from. Saudi Arabia still has a pretty big number of oil regardless though. However we could always ask socialist Venezuela for a handout.


#12

:yeahthat: Could not agree more.


#13

I should add that the chart I posted does not include domestic oil production, which makes up about 45% of US oil consumption.


#14

The spewing of one unnamed “diplomat” is all the Terrorist supporters can come up with to start lamenting the loss of their hero Saddam again, big shock.

Notice how all the voices in Iraq that condemn the Terrorist’s are rarely mentioned even though that is the evidence that Iraq was worth it, if the pro Terrorist elements still had significant authority their detractors would have been brutally silenced long ago.

But I guess that does not perpetuate the Anti Semitic agenda so it is not relevant.


#15

So what? That’s no different an argument than exhorting Americans to buy only American-made cars and trucks. If they want to adopt a policy that will impoverish themselves towards some greater political goal, who are we to complain or even object? They don’t owe us anything more than we owe France. Sure, we liberated them. What’s the statute of limitations on gratitude? Heck, we liberated Europe. How’s that workin’ out for ya on the gratitude index?

And we have the perfect example, right within the region, of a nation that has followed that exact same policy; the subjugation of economic interests to geopolitical interests, in Iran. Even before the recent escalation of sanctions, the country has become a basket case. It doesn’t drill oil wells and it cannot maintain the ones it has, while it has had to import gasoline, for gawd’s sake, for well over a decade. Its standard of living drops consistently and its citizenry is largely discontented, if not more seriously angry. The principle argument against going to war with Iran is that the entire nation is going to economically implode in well under a decade, perhaps within the next five years. That’s not at all dissimilar to what happened to what used to be the USSR, which is now thriving on an economic index we’d have to go back to the 1950s, if not earlier, to emulate.

This is nothing more than politics seeking to utilize economics as a weapon. And so, we should treat it not as an economic matter, but a political one. And the first rule of politics is, when your opponent is in the process of self-immolating his campaign, don’t do anything to get in his way of doing so.


#16

I should add that Jebby is not only correct in his presentation of oil consumption sources, but that the United States is now the “Saudi Arabia” of natural gas. We’re on the brink of a North American energy expansion that, if we can get our fiscal house in order, will fuel the American economy into an economic expansion not seen since the early twentieth century. The only thing keeping energy prices from declining precipitously is world debt.


#17

My point is with almost 5,000 dead soldiers, more than 4,000 wounded soldiers, and more than a trillion dollars added to our debt to pay for it all in the name of replacing Saddam with a government not so friendly to us and just as oppressive of the people, if not more than Saddam was, maybe we should have left well enogh alone and left him in power.


#18

But yellowcake!


#19

I can’t remember where I read it, I believe it was the WSJ about 2 weeks ago, but they had an article showing that the US will even be the largest oil producer in the 2030s, producing over 12 million barrels per day, although we will slip to 3rd by the 2040s (still producing almost 10).


#20

Maybe had we mind-reading powers, sooth-saying abilities, or some other super-de-duper way of knowing with metaphysical certitude what the future holds, that idea might, maybe, even possibly, made sense. We probably shouldn’t have pissed off the Brits in 1812, either.

As it were, al Qaeda sustained stunning, probably irreversible losses in Iraq, Libya promptly ended it nuke program and made Pan Am restitutions, and Iraq is a democracy. Not a bad decades work.