marijuana arrest


#1

Amanda Bynes was taken away by police in handcuffs after being arrested for reckless endangerment after allegedly throwing a foot-long bong out of the window of her 36th floor New York apartment.

The incident came after police arrived to speak to the troubled actress about her alleged marijuana use on Thursday night.

She was then taken to a hospital for a psychiatric evaluation before being booked at the police station for criminal of possession of marijuana, reckless endangerment and tampering with evidence.

Read more: Police arrest Amanda Bynes for alleged possession of marijuana at her New York City apartment | Mail Online

A teen star to a nutjob,marijuana has been good for her./sarcasm


#2

Wow what a criminal…


#3

So ONE Goofball is indicative to an entire group of people?


#4

She’s also an alcoholic and is probably doing cocaine as well. In any case, I’d rather be a person doing marijuana who throws their glass bong out the window than a person doing meth or heroin that dies from a drug overdose.


#5

I hope there is openings in gitmo for her!


#6

Never heard of her, and I’m not sure why we’re supposed to care about every little tidbit about some stranger’s life, (as in what they’re wearing and which purse she chooses to carry), but this is a perfect example of what happens to childhood stars, and why it’s such a bad idea. In short, there ain’t no Walt Disney’s around to protect them anymore, they’re treated as adults, and cannot handle it.

That said, it weren’t marijuana that had this chick acting so over the top loco. It just so happens that that’s the only illegal evidence they had to use as an excuse to haul her off.
Considering the way she was acting, I can’t say as I blame the doorman, and perhaps other residents, for wanting her our of there, but nobody’s gonna tell me that pot made her act crazy. Alcohol, maybe; or crack, or meth; but not pot.
Give it up. That doesn’t happen.

There was one part in there, though - not allowing her to board a plane - that had me wondering if the airline/pilot, etc., are really that ignorant, or were looking for an excuse themselves.
A suspended driver’s license is a valid ID. It’s just not valid for driving.
Still, if she was acting like a horse’s pattoot, I don’t blame the airline. They’ve other passengers to consider, along with their reputation.


#7

I wonder how many marijuana opponents are self righteous beer drinkers.

Personally I have never done either.


#8

Nevertheless, BF, this was not a “marijuana arrest”, and I, for one, don’t appreciate the misleading headline.
The “Reefer Madness” mentality annoys me no end.


#9

It is sad from this,

The Amanda Bynes lost interview - YouTube

To this,

Amanda Bynes Meltdown video from - YouTube


#10

Looks like I am seeing the usual doing drugs causes no harm argument.


#11

[quote=“samspade, post:1, topic:39605”]
Amanda Bynes was taken away by police in handcuffs after being arrested for reckless endangerment after allegedly throwing a foot-long bong out of the window of her 36th floor New York apartment.

The incident came after police arrived to speak to the troubled actress about her alleged marijuana use on Thursday night.

She was then taken to a hospital for a psychiatric evaluation before being booked at the police station for criminal of possession of marijuana, reckless endangerment and tampering with evidence.

Read more: Police arrest Amanda Bynes for alleged possession of marijuana at her New York City apartment | Mail Online

A teen star to a nutjob,marijuana has been good for her./sarcasm
[/quote]Thus arrest


#12

Strawman much?

People like me talk about the level of harm and the problems of prohibition. Not that there is *no *harm.


#13

I’ve done both, and I still do drink quite a bit of beer.

I can’t understand how anyone who drinks alcohol can be in favor of marijuana prohibition, especially after the disastrous results of alcohol prohibition and the failure of the War on Drugs.

I personally can’t stand smoking pot anymore. I feel sick when I do it, my blood sugar/pressure drops immediately after taking one puff and I feel really sick.

Beer on the other hand…well that’s perhaps one of mankind’s greatest discoveries.


#14

(deleted for violating rules and stuff)
You, and/or the moderators, and anyone else who is so inclined, may take as much offense to that comment as you and they like.

I, for one, am dragged out, tired to death, had it up to the ying-yang offended, myself, by broad-brush comments like that; especially when not one single soul on this thread said anything of the kind. As a matter of fact, quite the opposite.

Not one single soul said, “doing drugs causes no harm.” Not one.
ALL that was said is that it wasn’t marijuana that caused her erratic behavior.

And I’ll thank you to take that insult back. (This borrowed 'puter won’t let me paragraph. Anyway, apologies for breaking the rules and stuff.)


#15

The only thing disastrous is the myths that have been created regarding its failure

What everyone ‘‘knows’’ about Prohibition is that it was a failure.

But the conventional view of Prohibition is not supported by the facts.

alcohol consumption declined dramatically during Prohibition. Cirrhosis death rates for men were 29.5 per 100,000 in 1911 and 10.7 in 1929. Admissions to state mental hospitals for alcoholic psychosis declined from 10.1 per 100,000 in 1919 to 4.7 in 1928.

Arrests for public drunkennness and disorderly conduct declined 50 percent between 1916 and 1922. For the population as a whole, the best estimates are that consumption of alcohol declined by 30 percent to 50 percent.

violent crime did not increase dramatically during Prohibition. Homicide rates rose dramatically from 1900 to 1910 but remained roughly constant during Prohibition’s 14 year rule. Organized crime may have become more visible and lurid during Prohibition, but it existed before and after.

Actually, Prohibition Was a Success - NYTimes.com
The (Not So) Roaring ’20s


#16

[quote=“2cent, post:14, topic:39605”]
Oh go piss up a rope.
You, and/or the moderators, and anyone else who is so inclined, may take as much offense to that comment as you and they like.

I, for one, am dragged out, tired to death, had it up to the ying-yang offended, myself, by broad-brush comments like that; especially when not one single soul on this thread said anything of the kind. As a matter of fact, quite the opposite.

Not one single soul said, “doing drugs causes no harm.” Not one.
ALL that was said is that it wasn’t marijuana that caused her erratic behavior.

And I’ll thank you to take that insult back.
[/quote]Apparently you think doing drugs is okay


#17

What part of my quote that:

nobody ever said anything of the kind

did you miss?


#18

I guess I’ll be waiting a while for that apology.


#19

Remind me again how alcohol magically disappeared from the United States and no one drank during prohibition.

Also, tell the families of the 10,000+ who were murdered by the federal government with tainted alcohol.
The little-told story of how the U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition. - Slate Magazine

We estimate the consumption of alcohol during Prohibition using mortality, mental health and crime statistics. We find that alcohol consumption fell sharply at the beginning of Prohibition, to approximately 30 percent of its pre-Prohibition level. During the next several years, however, alcohol consumption increased sharply, to about 60-70 percent of its pre-prohibition level. The level of consumption was virtually the same immediately after Prohibition as during the latter part of Prohibition, although consumption increased to approximately its pre-Prohibition level during the subsequent decade.

Alcohol Consumption During Prohibition

Second, consumption of alcohol actually rose steadily after an initial drop. Annual per capita consumption had been declining since 1910, reached an all-time low during the depression of 1921, and then began to increase in 1922. Consumption would probably have surpassed pre-Prohibition levels even if Prohibition had not been repealed in 1933.

Per Capita Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages (Gallons of Pure Alcohol) 1910-1929.

http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/images/pa-157a.gif

Alcohol Prohibition Was A Failure


#20

Bleh, the Chemist’s War, and that doesn’t even begin to go into the unknown numbers of people who were poisoned by improperly made Speakeasy alcohol.