Martin Luther King, Jr., Conservative


#1

I have been seeing article after article for the past few years where Fascist/Progressive/Communist/Liberals have been spending a great portion of their time refuting that Martin Luther King, Jr., was a Conservative. Let’s look at a few of his statements from the now-famous “I Have a Dream” speech of 1963:

**In a sense we have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. **

The “magnificent words of the Constitution”… Sounds to me like we’re not talking about a “fluid” document. When was the last time you heard any Democrat refer to our Constitution as “magnificent”?

**But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check – a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. **

When I hear the Dems constantly beating the drum about taking time to reach across the aisle, or compromise, or to slow down to look at the facts, I think about this line where MLK mentions “cooling off”. I think about Hillary talking about getting all the facts before condemning terrorism. I think about Obama not condemning Pakistan imprisoning the doctor who helped us in killing Osama. I think about Reid not condemning the IRS for targeting U.S. patriots. And MLK’s mention of the tranquilizing drug of gradualism…can you say Cass Sundstein’s “nudge” philosophy?

**But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. **

Dems, please take note…in order for us to enter into the palace of justice, we “must not be guilty of wrongful deeds”. Bitterness and hatred are not legitimate rationalization for gaining a rightful place. Just because you disagree with how things are going politically does not mean you have the right to cheat, lie and steal elections. Voting twice in order to ensure fairness is not right or legal. Not prosecuting a Black Panther for intimidating voters because he is black is not right or legal. Beating up white people because you disagree with the Rodney King verdict is not right or legal. Anything illegal done in the name of justice because you wish to gain fairness will result in a discredit of your intentions.

**We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. **

Somebody needs to phone the Black Caucus and let them know that MLK is calling long-distance from 1963.

**I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. **

Someone should get on the horn with Eric Holder, too.

**I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers. **

Sorry, who was this governor of Alabama…Oh, yeah…a Democrat, right…

***Wallace was elected governor in a landslide victory in November 1962. He took the oath of office on January 14, 1963, standing on the gold star marking the spot where, nearly 102 years earlier, Jefferson Davis was sworn in as provisional president of the Confederate States of America. In his inaugural speech, Wallace used the line for which he is best known:

“ In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny, and I say segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever." ** *

And this is my absolute very favorite part of the speech…a man who is not afraid of the word God and freedom and prayer and liberty…

**This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”**

Where are Democrats today who feel like this? Man, do I wish this man were alive today. Every man and woman would do well to read this speech every year to remind them of what’s really important.

God Bless America!


#2

MLK Jr’s main accomplishment in the civil rights movement was he was able to use the courts as well as the coercive power of the government to force private citizens against the will to sell their goods and services to african americans.


#3

[quote=“Gov101, post:2, topic:39591”]
MLK Jr’s main accomplishment in the civil rights movement was he was able to use the courts as well as the coercive power of the government to force private citizens against the will to sell their goods and services to african americans.
[/quote]Just to note, this act did much more that had nothing to do with forcing citizens to trade against their will. It’s unfortunate that this provision was part of it and that it presumably had the support of the man who said this awesome little gem: **I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

**​But nobody’s perfect.


#4

Democrats today would try to marginalize him if he were alive today.


#5

It was crux of the act. That citizens in the private sector providing public accommodations like hotels, transportation, and restaurants, could no longer discriminate. It’s extremely liberal and it’s what he fought for for many years. Freedom riders, restaurant sit-ins, etc etc.


#6

[quote=“Gov101, post:5, topic:39591”]
It was crux of the act. That citizens in the private sector providing public accommodations like hotels, transportation, and restaurants, could no longer discriminate. It’s extremely liberal and it’s what he fought for for many years. Freedom riders, restaurant sit-ins, etc etc.
[/quote]And that fight was incredibly important right up until it became legislation :confused:

And if liberalism is oddly about state power in these times, then yes, it was extremely liberal.


#7

Martin Luther King Jr. may have been conservative, but if so that is not how I would prove it. Your evidence is extremely shaky, interpretive, and disconnected from the evidence you present. You attempt, in your analysis of King’s words, to express your opinion without reliably and objectively tying your points back to the text.

Your point is taken, but I do not accept it on the basis of your evidence.