Microsoft vs Apple


#1

Well I say MS CEO Steve ballmer tout Windows 8…
Sorry folks, not impressed. The big thing is the computer with a touch screen…DUH, how long has that been around??? Well touch screens have been available since the 1960’s and more than one computer company tried it. It works on a tablet but not on a desk top…I know we tried it and its not a good user experience, folks work better and faster on a keyboard and mouse.

I will look at Windows 8 but not likely to be blown away, MS has never had a product that blew anything away. In fact based upon what ballmer said they are still playing catchup to Apple on GUI’s…in fact MS FOUGHT it up until just a few years ago. There mindset was still cmd line interface and they would be using it today if Apple had not started gaining market share…

[LEFT][/LEFT]


#2

It is a fine choice for tablets & smart phone…but it SUCKS for laptop users and companies. The worst thing is being forced to the new interface on all new PC’s when WIN7 is an outstanding operating system. I hate both companies.
Maybe it’s time for Google to step into the desktop/laptop market with a Win7 type Android OS.
Instead of OpenOffice…maybe we can get OpenOS !! (no linux jokes!) :smiley:


#3

Yea, what got was ballmer touting using your finger as if it is some kind of magic and MS just invented it (actually it was IBM), to be honest in all the year in my IT career and of all the engineers that worked for the ones that just could not adapt were those that had ever worked at MS…I just got to the point that if I saw it on the resume they got a pass…my first computer (not a terminal) was a Sun workstation and I never had a MS DOS computer until the mid 90’s around 94 or 95…my wife is a MS engineer, the only one I ever hired that worked out, but she never worked at MS…


#4

[quote=“17Oaks, post:1, topic:36783”]
Well I say MS CEO Steve ballmer tout Windows 8…
Sorry folks, not impressed. The big thing is the computer with a touch screen…DUH, how long has that been around??? Well touch screens have been available since the 1960’s and more than one computer company tried it. It works on a tablet but not on a desk top…I know we tried it and its not a good user experience, folks work better and faster on a keyboard and mouse.

I will look at Windows 8 but not likely to be blown away, MS has never had a product that blew anything away. In fact based upon what ballmer said they are still playing catchup to Apple on GUI’s…in fact MS FOUGHT it up until just a few years ago. There mindset was still cmd line interface and they would be using it today if Apple had not started gaining market share…

[LEFT][/LEFT]
[/quote]I created a dual boot drive and installed the evaluation copy of windows 8. I was not impressed. Your analysis is right on. I have a cordless mouse and key board and can sit back but having to sit up and touch the screen defeats the purpose of my comfort.


#5

In the 80’s we tested touch screen & not a single person had a good thing t say. Your keyboard is still in play & as u said its easier 2 use the mouse


#6

You just have more precision with a mouse and keyboard, which is what a desktop requires. Thankfully that square metro thing is only for the start menu.


#7

Windows 95 was a pretty impressive step, everything that followed was small on new functionality and big on eye candy.

I still have not had one business move off of XP as their platform unless they are switching to Debian Linux, the only time I get a call regarding Vista or Windows 7 it is a home user who got it because they had no choice when they bought their computer.

I only have one Apple Computer, it is a 2009 Imac with a 22 inch monitor and a 3 GHz core 2 duo CPU with 2 Gigs of RAM running OS-10. It is a true joy to operate this machine.

I brought it home to see how reliable it was. It has never been turned off after all these years unless there is a power failure.

I assigned it to my kids with the instruction “try to break it”. They know what I mean by that, I want them to use all the social networking sites, accept all the plugins and add on’s to play all the games on all the sites they visit, utilize all their favorite IM programs and sync their mp3 players through this machine as well.

They would have turned multiple Windows based PC’s into frozen junk by now if I allowed them this Liberty to compute with complete abandon and disregard for what they were installing and doing.
This Imac runs as fast and smooth today as it did years ago when I first plugged it in, no virus’s, no spyware, no bloated list of crap that runs at boot, no glitches in any of the functions.

I literally forget it is there.

I don’t use it myself for software reasons but if I was just a regular user who did all the normal stuff with a computer I would not even consider anything but a Mac. I have a large family and I am the token IT guy who fields all the calls for computer issues, I started advising all of my Church and family members to buy Macs when Vista came out.

About half took my advice, I NEVER hear from them with computer issues anymore.
The other half are the reason I am forever googling information about Vista and Windows 7 so I can walk them through all the same crap that has plagued Microsoft users for decades.

If you are a typical user who just wants everything to work correctly without constant maintenance to keep it from becoming a bloated, sluggish mess and if you want your computer to last a long time then i see nothing even close to the Mac.

Even my personal preference (Linux Distros) are on such a fast release cycle now that I am constantly upgrading to maintain access to the software repositories, Macs are great for legacy support.


#8

A lot of Apple’s and OS X’s stability comes from the fact that OS X has a set standard and design that the operating system is going to look like. Hence OS X comes off a lot more like a very controlled and universal interface. Everything looks like it was designed by a single entity, and everything coexists together. There’s also a lot of control over what the user can and can’t do. The OS sets it so that, while the default user is an administrator, it is not the root user, and in fact most times this account is disabled. Anything bad that’s going to happen to your OS requires you to enter your password into a box, or either simply won’t be allowed to happen if you don’t have permission to do it. All in all, you can tell there’s a lot of cooperation and focus at the Appe HQ where the OS was built, and OS X has been using the same basic design for almost 12 years now.

Windows, on the other hand, seems to be designed by many different divisions in Microsoft, and a lot of times the design shows this, with different parts of the OS having different interface designs. And because of this, especially with versions of Windows that aren’t so good like Me, the different parts of Windows don’t work so well together. And in turn, it compromises the security of the system. The computer will freeze, slow, or crash because different parts of the OS want to do different things. And the default user on Windows is the administrator, with no root account. If you want something to happen, on Windows, there’s usually a way to get it done, even if it is a horrible idea. I could delete system files on Windows much more easily than I could on Mac OS X. Not to mention that Windows is using the single-user less-powerful MS-DOS while OS X is using the tried and true multi-user Unix architecture.

And if you can’t afford the Mac, I would recommend any Linux distro like Ubuntu or Fedora or Linux Mint, whatever. I moved from MS-DOS some time ago and I don’t think I’ll go back unless it’s necessary to run software.


#9

I get the impression that Window 8 is a step backward. Maybe they need to split their upgrades between hand-held devices and “real” computers.


#10

Windows 8 is MS’s answer to Androids APP availability. They are doing what MS does so well and capitalize on the success of others. Win7 already has touchscreen capability I use it at work all the time.


#11

[quote=“Dacabeti, post:10, topic:36783”]
Win7 already has touchscreen capability I use it at work all the time.
[/quote]I did not know that. I already have windows 7 professional, all I would need is a touch screen monitor if I wanted to do it.


#12

yes and the drivers

Windows Touch - Microsoft Windows


#13

The Mac OS is a structured programming environment, its is governed by the HIG (Human Interface Guidelines). You either play by the rules or your software does not work, simple as that.

Back in the early-mid 80’s I had just got promoted to Asst Project Manager for development of a non-command line interface for software we were developing on the UNIX platform. One day in a meeting one of my engineers asked if any of us had seen the Apple Macintosh? Well not really, then he said you got to see this thing, its what we want and more. So at lunch we headed down to a store to see them. WOW, I was blown away, I bought 25 of them, contacted Apple and I and my shop became Apple developers. We did not develop any Mac software, but we did want access to all the documentation that came with being a developer which puts you in the Mac at the root level. I personally stayed a developer up thru the mid 90’s developing various pieces of software on the platform.

R&D is a lot of fun for a tech IT engineer I can assure you. RET talked about turning it over to the kids to break. We did some testing down at Ft Benning Ga and we tested Zenith which was a major govt desktop contract, IBM’s, and either HP or Compaq and Mac’s. Included was the supporting printers, Apple Laser Printer, best laser printer ever made!. We gave a couple of Infantry units sets of computers with the mission to run them, take them to the field with you, what ever you need to do to run your organic software etc. It was a 6 month test to capture general info, ease of use, setup, reliability and a host of everyday use answers from end users.

Well the test did not last 6 mo, every single computer and or printer failed, except the Mac’s and the Apple Laser printers. First to fail was the IBM, then the Zenith. What killed them was the field operating conditions and electricity being provided by military gensets. Only the Mac could handle it, the rest fried after a while.

Different between Gates and Jobs?

Gates wanted to make money and he did, of course he came from money, mom/dad both big time corp lawyers

Jobs, wanted to change the world and he did


#14

I don’t doubt this at all, the Mac seems bulletproof to me.


#15

There are times when I wish the command line were still readily available. But everyone seems to want all those pictures to look at.


#16

I should have mentioned WHY the Mac survived the test cycle at Ft Benning. It was due to the Mac being able to natively run on 110 - 240 v auto switching. Apple built that way in order to not have separate computer lines for US and Europe (rest of the world). Hence the power cord was a separate item and included in the shipment to US or Europe or Asia. You plugged into the Mac and plugged into the wall and hit the on button and it booted. In the early days computers had a power cord that was attached and if you wanted one for Europe you had to buy a different computer.

This auto switching make the electrics very stable and near bullet proof for surges…we had a Mac that took a lighting strike thru the Modem, which melted, melted the monitor and the Mac would still boot, in fact that old Mac as CX or a CI is still over at a company and it still boots up. It sat on the CEO’s desk and while he does not use it he told me he thanks it every day for not frying all the companies data way back when it was a startup.


#17

Use the command prompt or Terminal on a mac.