Milwaukee frozen custard shop defends ‘English only’ policy


#1

On Tuesday, Joey Sanchez stepped up to the counter of Leon’s Frozen Custard, a 70-year-old Milwaukee staple, and listened to the customer in front of him place his order in Spanish.
The shop is located on the city’s south side, in a neighborhood with a large Hispanic population. Sanchez thought nothing of it.
Then he heard the server’s response.
“She whispered to him in Spanish, ‘I’m not allowed to speak Spanish to you,’ ” Sanchez told TV station Fox 6 Now.
Sanchez was shocked.
So when it came his turn to order, he, too, used his native tongue.

Few places any more do not have answering systems where they ask you if you want the language in English or Spanish. Now this is very annoying to native Americas who are told they have to learn a foreign language rather than immigrates learning our language. I have noticed that some commercials on TV are now keyed to Mexicans.

A few years ago there was another story of a business which had a English only sign and there was the same controversy about speaking only English.

So will the fight continue to reshape America into a nation which bends to everyone else’s desires?


#2

If you have staff that speaks Spanish(or any other language) then I do not see the problem. If none of your staff knows a foreign language then English is the only option. I do not see what the big problem is.


#3

The problem is that the Left wants people to be afraid, VERY afraid, of saying such a thing - much less promoting it. A polyglot society is, to them, Progress - very forward-looking, very non-American, and so, very, very good.

Having a bunch of people who cannot communicate with each other, harkens to them a successful society - Hong Kong, or maybe Babel. Not understanding business, culture, history or economics, and not only not-understanding the workings of a successful nation but hating the very CONCEPT of a society united by culture…they get all excited about using their ham-fist of legalism and social-engineering judges and lawmakers to BLUDGEON people who insist on sticking with the values which made us One Nation.

THAT is the problem. Such people who are proud to be Americans…MUST…BE…DESTROYED.


#4

Is this ACTUALLY annoying? I ask because honestly, it never bothered me at all. I’ve been to several countries, I will in the future as well. I’m learning Mandarin Chinese. It’s not easy to learn Manarin Chinese, let me tell you. Funny thing, Taiwanese businesses never have discriminated against me when I tried to order food. Heck, many of them had English menus for ordering their food. With the way some people act in the United States, I see people crap on legal immigrates as they try to learn English. Apparently unless you are fully fluent the moment you get your green card, you are low life scum as far as ring-wingers are concerned. Sad.


#5

While I agree, Seravee and Maylar, JPT has a point. I won’t be surprised to see laws requiring service in the language of the customer’s choice – or else face a discrimination suit. The leftwing bludgeon is very ugly, insane and illogical.


#6

Even as far down as the USA has fallen, I admit I’d be surprised. Even countries far more left leaning than the USA haven’t done this because of the obvious logistical nightmares involved. Then again, with touchscreen ordering kiosks starting to increase in popularity, perhaps this won’t even be an issue. Select your language from the upteen billion languages available. Wasn’t hard when browsing the web in Taiwan to select the language menu and select English. Doubt it would be an issue for touch screens.


#7

[quote=“Maylar, post:6, topic:48768”]
Even as far down as the USA has fallen, I admit I’d be surprised. Even countries far more left leaning than the USA haven’t done this because of the obvious logistical nightmares involved. Then again, with touchscreen ordering kiosks starting to increase in popularity, perhaps this won’t even be an issue. Select your language from the upteen billion languages available. Wasn’t hard when browsing the web in Taiwan to select the language menu and select English. Doubt it would be an issue for touch screens.
[/quote]Everyone should feel comfortable doing everything… Trigger warnings? Microaggression? I don’t expect it very soon, but I won’t be surprised heh


#8

Go to Paris, and try asking directions in English.

And yes, most Frenchmen speak English. Until recently, it was the language of commerce. But they REALLY resent when someone comes to their midst and doesn’t try to learn their tongue.

My old man was detailed to Paris for a year. This, after - as a GI private - having been in the Liberation of Paris in WWII. He had always wanted to go back.

He didn’t take French in school - his native tongue was German; English was his second language and he worked hard at it - to speak with a neutral accent. French, he didn’t try until he was actually THERE.

His French, he knew, was atrocious. Didn’t matter - that he was TRYING, opened doors and got cooperative help and smiles. Frequently he’d get corrected - in English or German; but he found it refreshing - a team effort.

Speak English, right off, though…and it’s the poker face and Gallic shrug.

Same thing in Japan. All the school children learn English; but they forget it the minute they meet a gajin on the street, asking for help. You speak Japanese, or find a friend to speak it for you…or else you’re alone.

The English world is one of the rare societies where refusal to speak or learn English is accepted, and now encouraged. And it will not bring anything positive to that world.


#9

I had some friends who went to Europe on his many frequent flyer points. When they went to France, they took a German girl with them ( a friend of their son’s German girlfriend). In one fancy restaurant, the waiter would only talk to the girl, even though he knew English perfectly well. But when they went to a Mom-and-Pop place, they were treated with courtesy. Now these people would probably never be in France (or anywhere in Europe) again. I just how much of these uppity French places make a great deal of their income from English speaking people.

On the other hand, relatively few people in this country are multi-lingual because we are a large country, and don’t have a lot of “foreign” visitors, comparatively speaking. I daresay that some people go through their entire lives without ever hearing a foreign language. And as for the opposition to speaking Spanish - that’s perfectly understandable because people who speak Spanish and come here to live expect to accommodated for their language and not to learn our language. If it were only occasional visitors, no one would be offended. But when we have “press 2 for English” in an English-speaking country, that’s got a lot of people’s goats. I wouldn’t complain in France about telephone messages being only in French - I would expect it. In any case, if I intended to live in France (heaven forbid), the first thing I would do would be to start learning French.


#10

I have to agree with Susanna. That is not to say that I would not accommodate others but only within reason. I am not going to hire a translator or require staff to learn a foreign language just so we can help the occasional customer that speaks a different language. Reasonable accommodation. No you also have to consider demographics in where you open business. If you open shop in a predominantly Mexican area then it would be smart to find employees that can speak Spanish other wise you risk losing a lot of business.


#11

Yes.

It should be, must be, the business’s RIGHT to choose what to do in that regard.

If a Chinese restaurant wants to open with employees who only speak Mandarin…that’s up to them. In fact many do - depending on the Chinese restaurant, it’s often hard to communicate with them.

Their business.

THIS is in regard to the control-freaks in government who also hate America, Americans, American culture and small businessmen; and can’t WAIT for a chance to slap them around.