My Stove

It may be nuts to be grateful for a stove, but I adore cooking and I have to show off my old 11-year-old stove. I call her “Sweety.” She was a housewarming gift from my dear Auntie Ruth, and you can see she still looks new. That pole thing beside her is a Swiffer, LOL, another amazing implement of destruction, especially with eight cats here.

The trick to keep these stoves looking new is a hand steamer. When stuff gets burnt on, the steamer takes it all off with just a tiny bit of work. The red rack over it holds common herbs and spices.

http://i1277.photobucket.com/albums/y483/Pookers/PookNSaavEtc%20008_zps8lxk3b34.jpg

Purrs,
Tigger

I cannot do glass cooktops. I love to use cast iron, and the glass tops are not compatible with the iron skillets. My Mom has one and swears AT it, not BY it.
I prefer gas, but out here in rural land, that would require a tank and LPG delivery. Not gonna happen.
But, if it suits your style of cooking, I see the benefits. It looks like a well kept unit. Cook on.

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I like gas tops and electric ovens. Have had both. The electric tops take too long to heat, and I’m impatient. Electric ovens seem to cook more evenly.

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I think the glass tops look nice, but I prefer gas. And like Tiny, I use a lot of cast iron. We’re 'way out in the boonies, but we still get gas. Used to be local gas, from 3 local wells. Now it comes from the Columbia gas line, which crosses our road just about a mile away.

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We are getting ready to install out new cooktop, a Bosch Induction unit. If you ever cook on one of these you will NEVER go back to electric and probably never go back to gas. Induction cooks via magnetic induction. Its ONLY hot where the pot touches the top, incredibly fast (faster than gas by a long shot) and most efficient.

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I thought about posting a pic of the dingy microwave that I eat out of when I stay out of town in my travel trailer but then I remembered “Oh yeah, I hate what I eat that comes out of that thing”.

But I married a great cook!

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A guy I used to work with was married to a woman who went to microwave about the same time they came out. She never cooked with anything else after that. One day her husband got a call at work - the microwave had died, so they would have to eat out. He said, “Why don’t you cook on the old stove?” Her response: “I don’t remember how.” And, based on other things her husband had said then, and at other times, I suspect that was the simple truth.

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The only reason I touch our microwave is to melt chocolate, or pop some popcorn.

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Wooooo! That’s scary LOL!

Purrs,
Tigger

We use ours to melt velveeta and to pop popcorn, too, but also to heat up leftovers. We don’t COOK on it much except to quick-bake a potato now and then. The secret to doing that is to wrap the potato in saran wrap first which holds in the moisture. We have a 30-year-old electric range and oven and it still works just fine. I prefer gas, too, but when we bought our house, it wasn’t “plumbed” for gas in the kitchen, though we have gas heat and a gas water heater. We have gas AVAILABLE–just not for the kitchen. It wouldn’t be all that hard to convert, but we don’t want to go to the expense.

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Tiny, read a good article on ‘dry aging’ the other day. One of the things it said was beef peaks out at about 120 days…

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I use both my stove and microwave. I drink coffee all day and reheat it in the microwave. I eat left overs so I reheat them in the microwave.

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I have purchased potatoes wrapped in plastic at the store and I find no difference if I take a potato and microwave it usig a paper towel. What gets me is the wrapped potatoes originally cost .78 cents and then went up .20 cents .

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I do my “baked” potatoes, differently. In fact, it is a misnomer to call it a baked potato.
I par boil the potatoes, let 'em cool, and peel them. Then, I deep fry them. Once out of the oil, I season them with seasoned salt. Awesome.
I guess I am just picky. I can tell when something has been warmed in a microwave. If I were at someone’s home, I wouldn’t really care about that, but a restaurant had better not try to pass microwaved food off on me.
I like fire. Just the way I learned.

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Sam you are a HARD man, I don’t drink reheated coffee, it changes the taste.

I start out the day with 2 16 oz cups of Italian Roast, Expresso ground, dripped one cup at a time.

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Coffee is my beverage for everything. I seldom drink anything else. I have been drinking coffee for 57 years from the age of 12.

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[quote=“17Oaks, post:11, topic:47197”]
Tiny, read a good article on ‘dry aging’ the other day. One of the things it said was beef peaks out at about 120 days…
[/quote]At 120 days, you get a real musky cheesey aroma and flavor.
Here’s how I have seen it go.
Most of the tenderization occurs within the first three weeks. Also, concentration of the beef flavor. Optimum time, if you want traditional beef flavor, is about 30 days. After 30 days, the enzymes that break down the connective tissue change the flavor to the earthy flavor tones many seek in dry aged beef. Many feel that 45 days is optimum for this flavor profile. 60 days is too long for most average beef eaters. 120 days, it is at the pinnacle of musky flavor, way way too much for me.
I like 42-45 days, but Ms. Tiny tops out at 30. So, we usually go thirty days. This is assuming Rib eye or Strip steak. Sirloin, which I have not aged, yet, should go about 35 days. A Tenderloin is useless to age more than 5 days, due to waste, and absence of fat, so I wrap those in cheesecloth and age them 5 days. It is not cost effective to use a dry age bag for that period of time, since it takes about 7 days for it to adhere properly to the meat.
All that said, I can never go back to eating store bought, non aged steaks. The difference in flavor and increased tenderness make dry aging well worth the effort, to me. Everyone should at least try it once.

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My experience is that if coffee is reheated on the stove - or in the automatic pot - it changes the taste. But not in the microwave.

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True. I used to reheat it in the pot and after awhile it is so thick that it tasted like mud. I remember when Mr. Coffee was introduced and all the hoopla about reheating coffee was a sales point to get people to buy it.

This reminds me of a story. I was fresh out of the orphanage and tried to make coffee. I put the pot on the stove and did so but unfortunately the coffee pot was electric. Mom was a little mad.

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I read once that re-heating anything in a microwave changes the chemistry of whatever it is being “re-heated.” It makes food and even WATER less “nutritious.”

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