My Stove

It must not be working I am still fat.

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Who said anything about “fat?” I said the chemistry is changed.

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[quote=“Pappadave, post:22, topic:47197”]
Who said anything about “fat?” I said the chemistry is changed.
[/quote]:devil:

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Yeah, well, all of that aged meat the guys have been talking about is changed chemically. Anything, in fact, is changed chemically when it is cooked. I suspect someone was looking for an excuse to bad-mouth microwave ovens.

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Microwaves have a place in the kitchen. For some, it is a very efficient way to cook.
But, for an accomplished cook, it is not often used.
Microwaves make meat chewy.
Microwaves make bread tough.
Microwaves can be used effectively, but should be used for warming or melting, not cooking.

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:yeahthat:

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That’s mostly what we use our microwave for. But it’s not bad - in fact, pretty good at cooking plain raw veggies. We use it sometimes for baked potatoes, but if we plan far enough ahead, we much prefer them done in a conventional oven.

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Your right about meat and bread being chewy and the bread tough. But I like the microwave for cooking fresh vegetables, especially corn and broccoli, and making rice. Some of the secrets to using the micro-wave, is what container is used and the power level.

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I am a great cook. I don’t “cook” anything in the microwave. I prefer gas stoves and ovens, but you can’t get one in apartments for some reason. I use the microwave for reheating, popcorn, and defrosting some things. Outside of those, I don’t do much with a microwave.

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So you want to cook with a micro, then you need to go commercial grade. I have cooked steaks, chicken, you name it in a micro and challenge anyone to tell the difference between it and stove top.

Most micros are LOW power, some as low as 650 W and what that does is exactly what you have encountered, meat like rubber, things dried out and not cooked. Back in my single days and an x wife who took every pot, pan, dish, glass, fork, toaster oven, micro you name it! I had a buddy who was a chef, he told me about micros they used. Said if I wanted one he could get it for me at the restaurant supply. We went and they had a BIG BOY on sale due to a model change, it was 1800 watts, commercial Amana Radar Range.

What will 1800 watts do: Cup of water in a ceramic coffee cup, water at faucet temp cold. Water would boil at just under 20 sec and EXPLODE at just over 25 sec and I mean EXPLODE. I learned this as I drank instant coffee at the time and would put it in at 15 sec in the summer months and 20 in winter months.

YES! I could BROWN beef and chicken and it never came out like rubber or tough.

I would have friends over and they were amazed at eating a steak or chicken that was tender, juicy and so tasty.

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That’s so nice! I wish I could do that!

Purrs,
Tigger

Our first microwave was a Litton demonstrator back in the 70’s. Later on, it became a $700 breadbox.

Have you ever used an air popper for popcorn? I haven’t found anything that works better. They’re fast, cheap and no clean up.

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…and the popcorn tastes like you’re eating packing peanuts!

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I love popcorn! I like to put kernels in a frypan, dump in a load of butter, salt, and parmesan cheese and let em pop! I keep the lid on it to keep it from flying all over.

My mother used to do that on those nights we went to “dollar night” at the drive-in because we couldn’t afford to buy their popcorn. She’d put it in a paper grocery sack which would be stained with margarine and Crisco by the time the movie started. (we couldn’t afford butter in those days.) She’d pop it in Crisco and add salt and melted margarine afterwards, however. We’d take shop rags to take the grease and margarine off of our fingers.

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My dad used to take us to the drive-in to see Disney movies like “Sleeping Beauty”. We loved it. Kids today don’t know what they’re missing.

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We’ve had air poppers - don’t care for them. Too much of the corn never popped. I prefer the last popper I bought - one that you use on the stove with a crank. Only my arm would nearly drop off after cranking that thing for a while. Uses only a small amount of oil. We don’t do popcorn any more as I am not supposed to eat it. FC used to get the microwave packets, but he quit, because it always smelled so good to me, and he gave up the popcorn out of courtesy. Wasn’t that sweet of him!?

When I was a kid, we had a screen-like wire popper, and we had a coal stove in the kitchen. It worked great. When my little brother was in the hospital and my little sister and I had to have a babysitter while the older kids were in school, my cousin’s wife would come over and sit with us. She amazed me by popping corn in a cast iron skillet! I had never imagined such a thing. Of course, I was only 4 and half years old then.

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The thing about popcorn is that the quality of the product is paramount.
The reason popcorn pops, is a small droplet of water inside the corn that, when heated, explodes the corn kernel. The larger the droplet, the more fluffy and completely it pops. That is why Orville’s is great popcorn. Fresh popcorn is essential. Heating is secondary, IMO. Any heat that causes that droplet to turn to steam, will work. Some better than others, I expect, but I never have problems with it popping fully when I use good quality corn.
I worked at a Gourmet Popcorn facility in the 80s. What’s Poppin’, was the name of the Company.

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I think I told everyone here about “gleaning” popcorn from a popcorn field up in Kansas some years ago. I filled half of a pickup bed full of the stuff. We hand shelled it, washed it and spread it out on towels all over the kitchen and dining room to allow it to dry out from the washing and then filled up those Tupperware dry cereal containers with it and gave them away for Christmas one year. Everyone raved about how good it was. It had a better “corn” flavor than any I’ve ever had…almost hominy-like. It was a big hit with family and friends. We had to caution people to leave the lid of those containers slightly ajar or it would develop mold, but everyone liked it–regardless of HOW they popped it.

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