New PPP Poll Shows Trump Holding Lead, But Ted Cruz Is Surging


#1

According to a new poll by Public Policy Polling, Donald Trump continues to be the frontrunner for the Republican nomination. The billionaire businessman has 26% support among Republican voters. He’s followed by retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson with 19%.
In PPP’s last poll from early October, Carson had 17% and Trump 27%.
This is a positive development for those who want Trump to fail, but it’s a far cry from the inevitable Trump collapse many experts predict. If one thing is clear, it’s that he certainly has staying power. That doesn’t mean he will actually win, but he certainly has a better chance than most.
The two frontrunners are followed by Ted Cruz, who’s positively surging.** Six weeks ago, Cruz was at 7% according to PPP; he’s now at 14%.**
https://pjmedia.com/trending/2015/11/19/new-ppp-poll-shows-trump-holding-lead-but-ted-cruz-is-surging

It’ll be interesting to see what happens when Trump starts insulting Cruz.


#2

Cruz is vulnerable, just as Rand Paul is, in the wake of the apparent intelligence failure that led to the killing teams in Paris. Paul and Cruz are the biggest GOP opponents of telephone metadata collection, and helped lead the fight to tank the NSA program that President Bush inaugurated, and President Obama continued, to collect such metadata (which doesn’t include collection of names, for which a court order is required). Keep in mind that Cruz sponsored this legislation to cripple NSA’s intelligence capabilities with the likes of Chuck Schumer, Dick Durbin, Al Franken and Barbara Boxer.

Cruz is no hawk, and while that may be appealing to some, with Daesh now knocking down airliners and shooting up concert halls, a more serious-minded opponent of global terrorism may be more appealing.


#3

The are all vulnerable in one way or another in some person’s eyes.


#4

Bull puckey.

That NSA intel collection did nada, zip, zilch, zero for anything even remotely connected to the anti terrorism efforts.

Can you tell us what attacks it prevented? What arrests were made from it’s data collection? What drone strikes were directed by them?

If you can answer, I have a nice new in-box pressure cooker I can send as a prize.


#5

Just because he cannot tell you what successes NSA has had does not mean they haven’t had any.


#6

N.S.A. Chief Says Surveillance Has Stopped Dozens of Plots - http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/us/politics/nsa-chief-says-surveillance-has-stopped-dozens-of-plots.html

And that was from 2013 and those are only the ones declassified.


#7

I would venture that human intel contributed far more. I’m very skeptical of that article, and what the NSA Chief is saying.

My main reason is money, and how federal budgets are approved, apportioned, and reapproved. If they don’t spend the money, they don’t get the money next time.
So, if I want to say that my budget is the biggest, I’m going to be sure I use every means available to spend that entire budget. If that means building a datacenter with 500 racks of Cray supercomputers, and teraflops of storage arrays to collect data from every source imaginable, then I’ll do it. Oh, and next year, to keep doing this job, we need more. Oh, and new office furniture since we still have some money left, and I want more next year.


#8

Democrat and Republican presidents have relied on NSA intel and I’m certain Cruz would want as much of it as he could get in a dangerous world.


#9

The NSA is a fine asset. Certain programs are not.

Get a warrant if you want my info. That’s it. Period. End of story.


#10

Quite true. I once worked under a federal contract and underspent my budget for the first year. I probably COULD have used a new copy machine, but didn’t get one. The next year, my budget was REDUCED by that amount and the copy machine crapped out with no money in the budget to replace it.


#11

Trump &Cruz should go survivor and team up…


#12

Yes, you always correct without question.


#13

Trump is top tier candidate for those of us seeking a true conservative ,besides Savage is warming up to him finally which is serious street cred as opposed to the usual gravitas…


#14

These cases were debunked some time ago, the Chief himself backed away from the figure. Conventional investigative techniques are what actually “closed the deal” on the two cases they tried to take credit for.

There’s equally room for skepticism in the NSA data collection being described as “successful”, because the NSA says so. Especially when they have a history of being non-forthcoming, and acting subversive towards their own oversight bodies.


#15

But Trump isn’t a Conservative. He’s a populist, much like Chris Christie.

He has some overlap, but doesn’t think twice about eminent domain abuse (cronyism), or taxing foriegn goods (protectionism). He also has a history with being enraptured with single-payer healthcare, whatever objections he has to Obamacare notwithstanding.


#16

[quote=“Alaska_Slim, post:14, topic:47769”]
These cases were debunked some time ago, the Chief himself backed away from the figure. Conventional investigative techniques are what actually “closed the deal” on the two cases they tried to take credit for. There’s equally room for skepticism in the NSA data collection being described as “successful”, because the NSA says so. Especially when they have a history of being non-forthcoming, and acting subversive towards their own oversight bodies.
[/quote]I suspect the work they do is priceless. I know without the kind of work they do Great Britain would have lost WWII before we had the chance to get in.


#17

Sure, in the sense it keeps getting unchecked funding for something they didn’t bother to tell the public or their overseers that they were doing.

Sorry, but clandestine, secretive power is corrupting power. Security does not go before liberty, and this is one of its largest threats.