Notorious vaccine-autism study a fraud


#1

[LEFT]What if a clinical study that touched off an entire political movement was “an elaborate fraud”? That’s what the British Medical Journal concludes in a new article: The infamous vaccines-cause-autism study was based mostly on fake data, the journal reports. In the first of a three-part series, the article shows how investigator Andrew Wakefield molded his data to fit his ideas, rather than the other way around.[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Read more: BMJ: Notorious vaccine-autism study a fraud - FiercePharma BMJ: Notorious vaccine-autism study a fraud - FiercePharma

Here is another verification that science has to be verified and not to fall into the trap of taking a study at its word.

It looks like this phenomena cuts across all fields of endeavor when the public is presented with studies that claim certain facts that are later pointed out to be completely wrong or have been “tailored” to fit an agenda.

Through out the years I have seen this over and over studies that later have been shown to be self serving rather than to help push the boundaries of knowledge along.

Autism is nothing to laugh at but when I see those who use it as a stepping stone to riches-------[/LEFT]


#2

I tried to explain the difference between research and science to Selah, some time back. Selah believed this study,while I knew it was bogus. I know
at least a dozen kids who had Thimerosal free vaccinations, and still had autism.
I agree that people tailor their findings to fit their agenda, and should be punished for it.


#3

It’s hard to know *what *to believe with this sort of stuff. I don’t believe vaccines cause autism, of course, but how do we know this is true? Everything’s so complicated when you can’t trust the media - it makes me feel like I’m living in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. :dead:


#4

Paranoia is a hell of a thing.


#5

Mike saw an article on Yahoo today advising against warming up your car. They claimed (among other things) that car exhaust causes autism. I think he said the source was “Yahoo Green.”


#6

[quote=“Susanna, post:5, topic:28787”]
Mike saw an article on Yahoo today advising against warming up your car. They claimed (among other things) that car exhaust causes autism. I think he said the source was “Yahoo Green.”
[/quote]Yeah if you go to these green sites they come up with some Lulu’s in their claims of environmentalism.

I saw an article the other day that was purported to give the real facts on global warming and two paragraphs down it became obvious it was just another global warming advocate site.

Why is it all we hear is how the ice is disappearing and never the fact that ice is building elsewhere on the poles?

North Pole ice ‘may disappear by September’ - Telegraph


#7

I shall provide an interesting, unrelated detail.

In Persian, Lulu means monster.


#8

This one? Eight Facts About Warming Up Your Car in Winter- Yahoo! Autos Article Page

It’s on the front page of Yahoo. I want to idle my car more now.


#9

That’s the one. It only addressed fuel consumption, warmth of the cabin, pollution and other things in an utterly biased way. They made a claim about it being hard on the car itself with this:

…idling forces an engine “to operate in a very inefficient and gasoline-rich mode that, over time, can degrade the engine’s performance and reduce mileage.”

And utterly failed to address how hard it is on bearings to just start it and go when the oil hasn’t had a chance to warm up and circulate, especially in the winter.

And they recommended things like hybrids that can preheat the engine block or preheat or precool the cabin prior to starting. No comment on how “green” those batteries are…

And speaking of comments, I don’t know if it was my script blocker or what, but I didn’t see any place to read or post comments. I would have done so, but perhaps they don’t want others to find out what some of us know.


#10

hehe There is no spot to post comments.


#11

Then it isn’t my script blocker. I think they’re cowards.


#12

More likely that they don’t want to hire people to Moderate a comments section. Can you imagine the sludge some Greenies would post?


#13

They have a comment feature on plenty of other controversial articles.


#14

I am pro-vaccination. But… there are physicians here in CT who insist on vaccinating a ton of obscure diseases. I mean, a LOT of them out here insist on it too – as in will not let you see them unless you agree to their list of 300 different items to vaccinate against.

We only vaccinate our kids against the big ones – Polio, Mumps, Measles, Rubella, and a handfull of others. But some docs out here want you to get a different vaccination shot every month for 2-3 years. They are Doctor$ and not healers. Each visit to their office costs us $80 / kid and that’s with insurance. Our insurance covers one well visit / year. And vaccinations are non-well visits.


#15

When I was a kid, small pox was the only vaccination required. When, as an adult, I went to the emergency room, the doctor couldn’t believe I hadn’t had the dpt shot as a child, and insisted on giving me the “initial” shot - I never followed up on it. If I had been thinking rationally, I would have told him I’d already had whooping cough.


#16

I’m autistic and I’m not sure about the vaccination-autism link. My mom thought I was having signs of autism when I was a baby (this was back in the mid 80s before autism became the fad disease) when I was getting my vaccinations. I got the vaccines but I got them in smaller doses.


#17

“When you were getting your vaccinations”? =/ Would that be before you got them, afterwards, or in between?


#18

I’m not sure. I’ll have to ask my mom.