Obama’s newest ally: John McCain


#1

President Barack Obama has an important new ally as emboldened Republicans work to derail his agenda: John McCain.

The shift is striking: The 2008 rivals never got along throughout Obama’s first term in office. McCain has been Obama’s chief tormentor on issues ranging from the budget to Benghazi, tartly saying in late 2010 that the two men had “no relationship.”

Yet during one of Obama’s toughest times as president, there was McCain, sitting down last week with him in the Oval Office for a private strategy session. At the urging of new White House chief of staff Denis McDonough, who has sought better ties with Republicans, Obama has had more substantive discussions with McCain in the past five months than he did in his first four years in office, according to associates of both men. Suddenly, the two are working together on issues ranging from immigration to the deficit.

“I’m getting nervous,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), McCain’s closest friend in the Senate. “I told Denis McDonough, ‘I don’t know what you’ve done: You’ve hijacked him.’”

There are many reasons for the sudden détente, including the fact that both men share common ground on several big issues that could wind up defining their legacies. But it’s unclear whether the Obama-McCain alliance can disrupt the gridlock in Washington given both men are viewed skeptically by many conservatives.

Still, the Arizona Republican can fill a leadership vacuum left by House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), whose relationship has soured with the president, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who is preparing for a potential primary challenge next year.

“Ever since the election, we’ve had conversations and phone calls,” McCain told POLITICO in an interview. “And I think we share many agenda items that we can work on together, ranging from immigration reform, the prison in Guantánamo, to working perhaps on a grand bargain, security of our embassies and consulates. There are a bunch of issues that we share.”

Asked when he was next expected to meet with the president, McCain said: “I’d like to be over there every day to give him guidance.”

Read more: President Obama


#2

McCain got Obama elected President to begin with, He is hardly a “new” ally.


#3

My reaction, exactly. Does this Manu Raju seriously think we’re THAT dumb? Sometimes it’s hard to tell if they’re trying to call us dumb, or are truly that dumb, themselves.
If that is the case, my advice to him is to avoid a candidacy on, Are You Smarter than a Fifth-Grader?".

However, I did get a hoot out of Graham ‘getting nervous.’ LOL!!!


#4

I smell a sitcom!


#5

It was ridiculous today that McCain came out once again complaining about Rand Paul. Sen. Paul took Senate to task for interrogating Apple execs about why they won’t pay really high tax rates to repatriate foreign profits. And McCain was “offended”. Well I’m offended by you Sen. McCain.


#6

+1

At the risk of leaving the impression that I am an Ayn Rand disciple (I am NOT) I wish the Apple execs had gone “Hank Rearden” on them when these Communist scumbags kept lobbing strikes right across the plate.


#7

The people of Arizona had a chance to run McCain out of the Senate 2 1/2 years ago and didn’t do it. The voters had the opportunity to off-load Obama last year and didn’t take it. Elections have consequences. McCain is who and what he is - and it’s what he’s always been. He enjoys being in the spotlight and he will do WHATEVER he has to in order to maintain his high profile - even if that means crawling between the sheets with BO!! No surprise here.


#8

McCain is another example of the GOP’s brilliant strategy of nominating people who aren’t much different than who the Democrats nominate.


#9

#10

I soured on McCain when he nominated Sarah Palin and then quickly backed down on supporting her, when she was still his VP candidate! I mean, at least be the stand-up guy and support the person you nominated, even if she’s suddenly bringing in loads more people at the rallies than you are. This guy gave her support like Obama gave support to the Armenians about the genocide there. I also specifically remember the both of these candidates lauding the validity of the whole Global Warming theory. Then, after his shameful loss, he’s on Hannity laughing along with the talk show host about how stupid the Left is when they support Global Warming. He’s just another duplicitous hack from Washington.


#11

I think Sarah Palin was picked just for the purpose to “excuse” McCain for not winning the election. Not just that, but to “discredit” her in the public eye. Everyone knew McCain couldn’t win, and Sarah Palin was to be the reason his chances went south (those chances he never had in the first place).


#12

IMHO, about the only thing positive about McCain’s candidacy was Sarah Palin. But, really, McCain’s candidacy was doomed from the start - because of McCain and 8 years of MSM hammering on the Bush administration and the MSM refusal to critically examine Obama’s record!!


#13

That man treated her abominably! He’s no gentleman, that’s for sure. I don’t know as there’s a quicker way to turn me off.


#14

And they repeated it in 2012 by nominating the liberal who lost to the guy who lost to Obama.


#15

And of course, their solution in 2016 will probably be to nominate someone who is even more liberal!


#16

Y’all know the saying - Never underestimate the Republicans ability to pull defeat from victory.


#17

McCain would not have gotten as many votes as he did if it weren’t for Palin.


#18

McCain could have won if he hadn’t picked Palin. Palin was as unknown and inexperienced as Obama was. She was quickly exposed as uncurious and simplistic. McCain’s biggest liability was his age, and voters’ concerns whether he would be able to serve out his term. Rather than select a veep that would assure voters that McCain was serious about the task he asking the voters to enlist him for (as Obama did when he picked old Washington hand Joe Biden), he picked an unserious ideologue of no real experience with a cutesy-poo voice and big hair.

I voted for McCain in spite of Sarah Palin, not because of her. But I know many folks who specifically decided with the Palin pick to abandon the GOP. Folks who’d been reliable GOP voters in the past, but who were appalled at McCain’s poor judgement and leadership.


#19

Palin was for more experienced than 0bama. She was known well in Alaska but not the rest of the country. I have yet to talk to someone that lived in AK while she was Gov. that does not like her.


#20

That was before they knew who she was, she talks a great game but thats about it. She had over a 90% approval rating 6 months into office but a poll done earlier this year shows she only has a 34% favorable rating in Alaska, that only 16% of Alaskans want her to run for president and only 37% of them would vote for her over Clinton