Organic is no better than nonorganic food:study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Organic produce and meat typically isn’t any better for you than conventional varieties when it comes to vitamin and nutrient content, according to a new review of the evidence.
But organic options may live up to their billing of lowering exposure to pesticide residue and antibiotic-resistant bacteria, researchers from Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System found

Organic food no healthier than non-organic: study - Yahoo! News Canada

I do not farm or have a garden but those who do have a benefit with the lack of chemicals used on the produce. There is a trade off in growing versus the convenience of just getting food from a store shelf.

[quote=“samspade, post:1, topic:36056”]
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Organic produce and meat typically isn’t any better for you than conventional varieties when it comes to vitamin and nutrient content, according to a new review of the evidence.
But organic options may live up to their billing of lowering exposure to pesticide residue and antibiotic-resistant bacteria, researchers from Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System found

Organic food no healthier than non-organic: study - Yahoo! News Canada

I do not farm or have a garden but those who do have a benefit with the lack of chemicals used on the produce. There is a trade off in growing versus the convenience of just getting food from a store shelf.
[/quote]Sam, as you know, I grow an organic garden. I do so, to protect my neighbor’s pond from runoff. However, I can see many benefits to the organic growing style.
Yes, they are correct about nutritional equalities of both. A plant takes up the minerals etc., the same way from either source. Both will meet established norms, for nutrition.
Inorganics become hazardous when they imbalance the system. Synthetic pesticides get into groundwater, and pollute it. Organics are not as bad to pollute. Antibiotics are not Good Eats. And mostly relevant to me, steroids used on livestock, could be having an effect on obesity.
Even if my neighbor deleted his pond, I would continue to grow organically, and will still seek organic ranchers for my meat.

Good post. Also, organic items are usually produced locally which reduces transportation and things of that nature. This also helps the environment. And the small business owner as well.

That’s the best thing, I think, is that buying organic, not always, but usually benefits local farmers.

Point being, that the “organic” stuff is not necessarily better for the person, but can make a difference in the environment. (That sounds too much like an eco-freak :freaked:, but it’s true up to a point).

In any case, many of us were anti-pollution before it became popular, and the eco-weenies went overboard with it.

I think organic onions have a better taste to them.

Well, not exactly. As far as vitamins and minerals are concerned, yes they provide equally well. And you are spot on about the environment. Yet, antibiotics and growth hormones/steroids have been noted to affect us. We do best to avoid these.

[quote=“Susanna, post:5, topic:36056”]

In any case, many of us were anti-pollution before it became popular, and the eco-weenies went overboard with it.
[/quote]:yeahthat:

[quote=“WhoIsJohnGalt, post:6, topic:36056”]
I think organic onions have a better taste to them.
[/quote]Yes, I agree that organically grown produce tastes better. However, if you “flush” your garden for two weeks prior to harvest, with clear, fresh water, the tastes will be the same. You see, many fertilizers use a salt base to deliver the nutrients. Pesticides are bitter. Don’t believe me, just taste Sevin dust. Both will have an effect on taste.
Organics treat the soil, not the plant. They can almost always be used right up until the harvest, or at least 2-3 days before. What is not used by the plant, degrades quickly.

My soil is very poor - a lot of clay, sand and rocks. I’ve been modifying the soil by mixing in rotten (rotting) wood. It makes a big difference, although it will probably take many years before I have really good soil. And I suppose it adds some nutrients. I can see a big difference in things that are planted where I’ve already “treated” it, and where I have. It’s a rather arduous job, since I have to do everything by hand. It’s also a very small garden, since it has to be fenced against the deer.

Great job amending. Wood is very good for supplying potassium. Yet, it robs the soil of nitrogen, during its decomposition. Wheat straw, leaves, grass clippings, etc, may work well.
Do you compost your kitchen scraps? Not hard to do. You can compost anything that is not animal based. However do not compost meat, milk, bread(draws pests), treated wood(or any wood you are not sure of), used kitty litter(though waste from herbivores is acceptable), blood, or anything synthetic. Walmart carries a small compost bin for about 50 bucks, but you only need a place that is away from the house, as composting smells. Do a search for composting, and read up. Compost gives the added benefit of supplying mycorrhizae bacteria, regulating nutrient uptake and pest susceptibility.
Human scent will keep the deer away. I use hair since I cut my own, monthly. I spread it around the perimeter. Some of my friends, well let’s just say the “make water” close to the garden. Kinda unsophisticated, but effective.

I saw a rabbit out in the yard earlier and it was laying down and I wondered if it was dead but it is gone now. For some strange reason I always get rabbits that seem to want to sit by that spot on the lawn. I had found a dead rabbit earlier this year and I decided to put it in a plastic bag and put it out with the garbage. Big mistake. Later I found that the can was over run with maggots just pouring out even though there was a lid on the can.

Susanna, you can quickly amend your soil, with store bought compost. I do not know how big your garden is, but a 2-3 inch thick layer of store bought compost will put you in business. Bags at Walmart or Lowes are as low as 2 bucks.
I buy organic compost every couple of years. I have a truck deliver 5 yards. Costs about 150 bucks including delivery. I amend approximately 1200 square feet, with that. Then, I use my own compost to supplement.
Just a thought, but if your garden is quite small, 10-15 bags would only cost 20-30 dollars.

Tried using hair (I used to cut the hair of both husband and son, didn’t have a bit of effect. I had a lot of shrubs planted in the garden to protect them from the deer, but I didn’t have room for much else, so I am gradually getting them out of the garden, and using a commercial (organic) repellant. Seems to work pretty well.

Interesting. As a young boy my brothers and I had to help my father plant and harvest a lot of veggies from his over ambitious garden projects. I hated the work back then, despised it so much that I’m sure I was a royal pain.

Now that I’m aging a little (still not settled yet), I find that I’m longing for land and a big garden myself. My children need to learn these things, but now I’m also in a position where I need to relearn things that’ll make the experience even better.

Small tips like this might stick with me. Thanks :smiley:

When I was able to do my gardening [ now i can just pot grow on the back deck] years ago, I was up on the magazines from Rodale Press. Some advise I got.
1] Chicken farms or horse farms [dairy farms if you got them] produce great fertilizer,
2] for an insecticide, gather a hand ful of the offending bug pace it in a blender [ prefferable not one that is used in the kitchen] grind up the bugs and use in a sprayer [ supposedly releases an inherent virus to kill the others ] [I do know it worked with japanese beetles on my grapes]
Wood takes too long to break down in the garden. My grandfather had a garbage pit in his back yard [ 60+ years ago] ALL of the vegetation food, weeds, anything biodegradable went in. GREAT COMPOST!

[quote=“njc17, post:16, topic:36056”]
When I was able to do my gardening [ now i can just pot grow on the back deck] years ago, I was up on the magazines from Rodale Press. Some advise I got.
1] Chicken farms or horse farms [dairy farms if you got them] produce great fertilizer,
2] for an insecticide, gather a hand ful of the offending bug pace it in a blender [ prefferable not one that is used in the kitchen] grind up the bugs and use in a sprayer [ supposedly releases an inherent virus to kill the others ] [I do know it worked with japanese beetles on my grapes]
Wood takes too long to break down in the garden. My grandfather had a garbage pit in his back yard [ 60+ years ago] ALL of the vegetation food, weeds, anything biodegradable went in. GREAT COMPOST!
[/quote]Hey but remember old people never did anything green years ago and history only started ten years ago for the young

Thanks for that hint on bugs! I don’t have grapevines, but the Japanese beetles do a real number on my one lonely rosebush. My sister also has them on her grapevines. I’ll tell her about it.

I know that livestock manure makes excellent fertilizer as well as organic matter. That’s almost all we used when I was young - except for a handful of super phosphate for each plant whenever we planted tomatoes. The wood I use is already pretty well broken down, and right now I’m more concerned with modifying the soil than fertilizing it. I have also had noticeable results within a few weeks of adding rotten wood.

[quote=“Susanna, post:18, topic:36056”]
Thanks for that hint on bugs! I don’t have grapevines, but the Japanese beetles do a real number on my one lonely rosebush. My sister also has them on her grapevines. I’ll tell her about it.

I know that livestock manure makes excellent fertilizer as well as organic matter. That’s almost all we used when I was young - except for a handful of super phosphate for each plant whenever we planted tomatoes. The wood I use is already pretty well broken down, and right now I’m more concerned with modifying the soil than fertilizing it. I have also had noticeable results within a few weeks of adding rotten wood.
[/quote]Wood does work good, if decomposing. Still, Compost can be cheaply acquired. Makes the garden ready, virtually overnight. Good Luck.