Principal suspends teen for Instagramming her mug shot


#1

In Georgia, a school principal is not happy to see her mugshot on Instagram. She allegedly tries to get a police officer to arrest the teen responsible. The police officer refuses.

No sooner does one odd controversy erupt in our teen education centers than another appears like a tardy bus.
The latest is a tale from Georgia. Please sit back. You may enjoy this.
An enterprising young man named Keandre Varner thought he’d discover whether his high school principal was, or ever had been, a criminal.
What joy, perhaps, for him to discover that there existed a mugshot of Jamille Miller Brown, principal of Riverdale High School, in Georgia.
If you were a mere teen and discovered your school principal’s mugshot, what would you do? Yes, you are correct. You’d post it to Instagram.

[Principal suspends teen for Instagramming her mug shot | Internet & Media - CNET News](http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57583839-93/principal-suspends-teen-for-instagramming-her-mug-shot/<br /><br />S)
Some say this is much ado about nothing but look at it this way. Where I worked behavior off campus could get you fired or disciplined.

If people had picked up that picture and thought that the DUI was the cause, there would be those calling for her removal from the school. The kid who posted the picture did not realize the possible consequences which could have resulted in job loss or lawyer fees to defend something that the kid thought was a prank.


#2

The principle shouldn’t have gotten arrested in the first place then. She had it coming.


#3

[quote=“brewerfanx1, post:2, topic:39439”]
The principle shouldn’t have gotten arrested in the first place then. She had it coming.
[/quote]Why did she have it coming? What if someone decided to bring up your past and then somehow it turns ugly which can cause you not only pain but may cost your livelihood or family?


#4

Suspended for re-posting something that is public record and freely available? It might have been in bad taste, but what rule/law was violated?


#5

If it’s part of the public record, then I don’t know if the suspension is warranted even though the kid probably shouldn’t have done it. Parents are run through the mill of background checks if they wish to become involved with school functions. If they have DUIs, are they excluded?


#6

Ok I just read the full story. The student posted that she had been arrested for a DUI but she had only been arrested for missing a court date for a speeding ticket.

I think the suspension is warranted if he did lie about the facts and maliciously try and slander her.


#7

I had a friend once who got stopped for DUI outside of work and she had a gun in the car. The work place tried to fire her. She had to have a lawyer so she could keep her job.

Now in the case of this woman from the article the allegation was plainly wrong and could result in consequences like a parent or two trying to make hay off of it.
As for why she did not make the court appearance that is up in the air. What are the facts?


#8

Ucky-duck … some key quotes from the article sam linked:

This was especially the case because Varner chose to add that he thought she’d been arrested for a DUI.

This turned out not to have been the case. She had been arrested for missing a court appearance that merely concerned a speeding ticket. So she called him into her office.

So, the student was partly wrong, in that he said she had been arrested for DUI. She had been arrested, but for failure to appear for a speeding ticket. So he was right about the arrest, but not the reason. Neither has clean hands. Maybe some one familiar with such procedures can help with further info. If I failed to appear for a speeding ticket, would an arrest warrant be issued the next business day? Or is there follow-up by mail, with a delay in issuing a warrant?

All that said, the meat of this story is here:

Miller was undeterred. She knew the law. So she reportedly asked a policeman to arrest Varner.

You might be wondering what she asked the policeman to arrest him for. I am wondering the same thing.

The policeman might have wondered the same thing too, as he reportedly refused to arrest Varner.

What was Miller Brown to do? Why, suspend the miserable miscreant.

Whatever the merits of the suspension, this principle abused her power - whether knowingly or in ignorance I won’t speculate - by trying to get the student arrested. Fortunately for that Georgia city/town, the police officer declined to arrest him. Talk about an open-and-shut false arrest lawsuit!

That this failed attempt at power abuse preceded the suspension and the fact that the “reason” for the suspension is not covered by the school’s rules bodes ill for that school district, should this student’s family consider legal action. In a bygone age, this student and the principal would have exchanged abject apologies and the student smacked up side the head (or at least had his ears bent with a good chewing out) afterward when he got home. Nowadays …


#9

[quote=“Conservative_Libertarian, post:5, topic:39439”]
If it’s part of the public record, then I don’t know if the suspension is warranted even though the kid probably shouldn’t have done it. Parents are run through the mill of background checks if they wish to become involved with school functions. If they have DUIs, are they excluded?
[/quote]Addressing what the principal did is something I did not cover in the response to the original article. I think she panicked and tried to punish the boy but like I said, this kid who thought he was being funny could have brought consequences that could have affected her life. She exasperated the situation by calling in the police.

Face it what would some people do if some little teeniebopper decides to post their picture on the internet and say that person has aids or something that could be used to harm one?


#10

I agree. If what jebby posted is true about the conviction info being misrespresented, then I believe that the kid should be in some sort of trouble. The problem is, as you have stated, the principal didn’t handle the situation very well either.


#11

Like everybody said, it’s public record. She applied for a position where you work with and around kids all day, and she honestly didn’t think a criminal or driving record would be brought up or exposed. She’s supposed to be a role model as the head school administrator

I have a criminal record for something I did a few years ago, and I don’t complain when it’s brought up, because I knew ahead of time that it was going to be public record. That’s a consequence of my actions, and it never goes away, as much as you want it too. This kid had every right to bring this up and to show others.


#12

[quote=“brewerfanx1, post:11, topic:39439”]
Like everybody said, it’s public record. She applied for a position where you work with and around kids all day, and she honestly didn’t think a criminal or driving record would be brought up or exposed. She’s supposed to be a role model as the head school administrator

I have a criminal record for something I did a few years ago, and I don’t complain when it’s brought up, because I knew ahead of time that it was going to be public record. That’s a consequence of my actions, and it never goes away, as much as you want it too. This kid had every right to bring this up and to show others.
[/quote]Somehow I doubt your sincerity on this. If you were to lose your job over it I would say you would be a little bit peeved.


#13

That’s the thing. I know for a fact that she had a backround check performed on her, an intense one at that, because every school employee does. However if a DUI charge doesn’t show up on it and she failed to disclose it to her supervisor, then she could very well be fired and it would be justified in this case.


#14

and criminals are “peeved” when they get caught that doesnt make them any less guilty. However in this case the principal has every right to be mad as false information was posted.


#15

Anyone who applies for employment in any public school in any state or district for any job is REQUIRED by law to have a criminal background check. The same background checks are required by MOST private/parochial schools as well. I know because I’ve had it done numerous times during my 25+ years of teaching. But again, this is CRIMINAL charges, not parking or moving violations. The authorities are mostly concerned with hiring someone who may have a history of being a sex offender. As most of you know, I had a felony conviction from 1972 for having sold marijuana to an undercover policeman. My criminal background would have that on it, but I’ve never been denied a teaching or principal position. I think if it had happened later on, say 10-15 years ago, there might be a problem, but because it happened so long ago and I’ve not had any legal problems since then, I think they believe I’m “safe”. I’ve never been told if it had any effect on my being hired.


#16

Did you withhold that info or did you disclose it upon application?

If this Principal never disclosed it, then perhaps, she deserves the pain she received. If the kid lied about the nature of the charges, then he should be disciplined too. This principal should have recused herself from deciding punishment.


#17

[quote=“brewerfanx1, post:13, topic:39439”]
That’s the thing. I know for a fact that she had a backround check performed on her, an intense one at that, because every school employee does. However if a DUI charge doesn’t show up on it and she failed to disclose it to her supervisor, then she could very well be fired and it would be justified in this case.
[/quote]So you stand by your assertion she deserved it because she some how did something to the kid or you hate teachers in general. You still have not answered the question. What did she do to deserve being put out in cyperspace with allegations that were wrong. Would you like it if someone decided to post your picture on line and tell everyone you are a child molester because that person felt that you deserved it? You do not seem to grasp the rational of the facts. What did she do to deserve it?


#18

No that’s not what I said and please stop putting words in my mouth. Listen very closely.

1.) It’s not about deserve. Deserve has nothing to do with it. When she got convicted of the DUI she lost that right to privacy and developed a record that is viewable to all.

2.) This kid had every right to know if his teacher/principle had a record of some kind. That information is made available to the public for a reason. I’ll use your own words in an example, The public has every right to know if a child molester also known as a sex offender is living near or around their children or is in contact with them. They have a right to know what kind of people are around their children.

3.) If this teacher or any other employee (I’m a business owner and I perform back-round checks all the time, about twice a week) fails to disclose or lies about their record, then they can be fired or not hired because of it. That 100% justified.

What I’m saying is reasonable under the law.


#19

read the article she was never convicted of a DUI, that was a false claim made by the student


#20

If she was never convicted then the student should be disciplined.