Re Current Terror Maybe Internship Should be Option (Japanese Wrong Target but..)


#1

Over the recent 15 years the West has been treated to a spate of terror attacks on Western soil:

[LIST=1]
[]September 11 attacks
[
]Fort Hood attacks
[]San Bernardino attacks
[
]Orlando
[]Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris in January 2015
[
]Paris Massacres
[]Belgium attack; and
[
]Just last night, Nice, France attack
[/LIST]
It has come to the point that saying “it isn’t all Muslims” just doesn’t do it. Granted, there are plenty of fully integrated Muslims, such as my next-door neighbor and one of my tennis partners. However, the Muslim community is literally doing nothing to ostracize and isolate the attackers. A contrary example is the way Meir Kahane of the Jewish Defense League was handled by U.S. Jews; total ostracization and marginalization.

There are plenty of Muslim/Jewish and Muslim/Christian “outreach” efforts consisting mostly of very urbane and genteel people of each faith gathering publicly and celebrating their friendship. This does nothing for the helpless people mowed down by the truck piloted by Tunisian-born Frenchman, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, or the victims of the other massacres. They were doing nothing wrong, other than attending a parade, or concert, or going to work.

We are taught in school that one of the great “injustices” of WW II was internment of Japanese.

There is always a tension, especially during wartime, between personal rights and public safety. This was illustrated in the recent past with the internment of U.S. citizens of Japanese descent. In one of the Supreme Court cases considering the issue the Court in Hirabayashi v. U.S.stated:

“The war power of the national government is ‘the power to wage war successfully.”

Hirabayashi v. U.S. 320 U.S. 81, 93, 63 S.Ct. 1375, 1382 (U.S. 1943)

The Court stated further:
*[QUOTE=U.S. Supreme Court in Hirabayashi]There is support for the view that social, economic and political conditions which have prevailed since the close of the last century, when the Japanese began to come to this country in substantial numbers, have intensified their solidarity and have in large measure prevented their assimilation as an integral part of the white population.FN4 In addition, large numbers of children of Japanese parentage97 are sent to Japanese language schools outside the regular hours of public schools in the locality. Some of these schools are generally believed to be sources of Japanese nationalistic propaganda, cultivating allegiance to Japan.FN5 Considerable numbers, estimated to be approximately 10,000, of American-born children of Japanese parentage have been sent to Japan for all or a part of their education.

Hirabayashi v. U.S. 320 U.S. 81, 96-97, 63 S.Ct. 1375, 1384 (U.S. 1943)*
[/QUOTE]

*In the notorious Korematsu decision the Court stated:
*[QUOTE=U.S. Supreme Court in Korematsu]
It is said that we are dealing here with the case of imprisonment of a citizen in a concentration camp solely because of his ancestry, without evidence or inquiry concerning his loyalty and good disposition towards the United States…To cast this case into outlines of racial prejudice, without reference to the real military dangers which were presented, merely confuses the issue. … There was evidence of disloyalty on the part of some, the military authorities considered that the need for action was great, and time was short. We cannot-by availing ourselves of the calm perspective of hindsight-now say that at that time these actions were unjustified.

Toyosaburo Korematsu v. U.S. 323 U.S. 214, 223-224, 65 S.Ct. 193, 197 (U.S. 1944)[/QUOTE]*In the Japanese exclusion cases it is true that some of the blame for the enclaving of the Japanese citizens was placed on the majority population of the United States. Perhaps if the lives of the community is made a bit uncomfortable they will reach out internally and stop the madness. Compromise and dialogue have been tried, to remarkably little effect.


#2

#3

The big problem with internship is that those we intern just might become radicals even if they weren’t to begin with. I would think that you need to raise the bar on investigation (wire tap, etc.), informants, & basically all the “normal” things that have been done in the past to learn about hate groups. Of course the obvious problem is that investigation is a waste of time if your letting people that you haven’t vetted immigrate at will. But honestly our government isn’t up to that stage yet. The first step is to be able to throw PC out the window & be able to use the term terrorist which our president doesn’t seem to be able to do.


#4

[quote=“Old_Tex, post:3, topic:49085”]
The big problem with internship is that those we intern just might become radicals even if they weren’t to begin with.
[/quote]The Japanese-Americans of today have very few radicals among them. Perhaps the show of strength was educational.

[quote=“Old_Tex, post:3, topic:49085”]
I would think that you need to raise the bar on investigation (wire tap, etc.), informants, & basically all the “normal” things that have been done in the past to learn about hate groups. Of course the obvious problem is that investigation is a waste of time if your letting people that you haven’t vetted immigrate at will. But honestly our government isn’t up to that stage yet. The first step is to be able to throw PC out the window & be able to use the term terrorist which our president doesn’t seem to be able to do.
[/quote]And act with regard to them as if it was a war; which it is.


#5

Granted they internship of the Japs was a knee jerk, but demanded by the American people and in fact the reality was that had they not been interned there is more than a good chance that many would have lost their businesses, perhaps died from American kickback.

Then the internship itself. Bad idea? Debatable! They like the Germans who were brought over here during WWII as POW’s, many down here to Texas due to our existing large German population, stayed on after WWII and brought their families over here and the Japs did not head back to Japan.

As for the US internment being one of the GREAT injustices of WWII, well that is the far left attacking America, its NO one of the GREAT injustices of WWII! Anyone who buys into that has not even turned a page on a legit history book. Better look and look HARD at the Ger and Japs treatment of POW’s, study the Bataan Death March. The real facts have been mostly hidden from the world, but they are there for those who want to dig,

And of course THE GREAT injustice of WWII: Our dropping the Atomic bombs…just more liberal BS!


#6

The INTERNMENT (not “internship”) of Japanese-Americans WAS a wrong. Reparations have been paid, by the way, to those who lost their homes and businesses during those years. The Japanese-American battalion sent to fight in Italy against the Nazis was the MOST DECORATED battalion in the U.S. military during WW II. I had a personal friend who was interned at Manzanar. He paid his way through dental school after the war by being a barber and later owned the largest dental prosthesis company in Indiana. When I was a child, he used to cut my hair and he, his wife and my parents would play cards afterwards while I played with their son.


#7

Correct, just switched browsers and trying to get used to the spell check, works different from my old browser.

Yes they were highly decorated and certainly saw some fierce fighting in WWII. They certainly are in the Top 20 most decorated units in history. They did not arrive in WWII until 1944 in Italy and they took huge losses, which leads to another debate over fighting ability and some will say many of the awards given (other than the PH) were given to maintain morale …no need to go down that path, the record is the record and let that stand.