Reflections on New Year at the Capital of the World


#1

I just got done watching the ball drop, on TV this time. As 1977 rolled into 1978 and 1979 rolled into 1980, I saw the ball drop, in person, in a very different New York City. The first time, NYC had just emerged from the Summer of Sam and the looting and arson connected to the July 1977 blackouts. The overall atmosphere as pervaded by crime, sleaze and decline. The question was whether it was even safe to go into New York City at night. Things were a bit better the second time. Koch was mayor, and I was with the college girlfriend that wound up setting me up with my wife. There were faint signs of revival.

Now, watching it on TV, New York City was obviously the world capital. Live music performances, including Jimmy Buffet in Brooklyn, were everywhere, NYC was clearly the place to be. Frank Sinatra’s last major hit, “New York New York” blared from the speakers.

Now a short history lesson. George Washington was inaugurated as President for his first term on Wall Street. While NYC’s turn as national capital didn’t last long, it has become the vital, throbbing heart of the world.

I am proud to be a New Yorker.


#2

In my not-so-humble opinion, only an idiot would SEEK to live in New York City–or ANYWHERE in the State of New York, for that matter. Confiscatory taxes and the resultant extraordinarily high cost of living would rule it out for anyone with more than one functioning brain cell. Fun city? Maybe…if you don’t mind paying federal, state AND city income taxes, 100% taxes (and more) on so-called “vices” such as soda pop, cigarettes, liquor, etc., paying $1.5K per month for a one room,
“efficiency” apartment in a rat-infested, cockroach-ridden firetrap of a building, paying $45K per year for a “protected” place to park your car, moving to Florida when you reach 65 and having the State of New York hunting you down so they can tax your retirement income, even though you don’t LIVE in New York any longer, and having your vote negated by the millions of professional welfare recipients who’ve moved there BECAUSE of the politicians’ “generosity” with other people’s money. No thanks.


#3

OHHH; At one time New York City was a neat place to live. In 1963 I lived in Mid-Manhattan on 48th Street between 5th and 6th ave in a 4 story walk up, over, what was then, ‘The St Germaine’ restaurant, (It now is a Chinese restaurant)
By Day I worked for a huge Architectural Firm, in the evenings I worked with a recording studio and jazz trio and eventually tried off Broadway plays. I was in my early twenties, and a bit gullible. But I survived and NYC was a place for adventure and hope. --Not so much any more. I was there for the New Year’s Eve celebrations for the three years I sojourned there, and although i stayed on the fringes, I was able to say I was a part of the goings on. I was in the GREAT Blackout of 65—that WAS an adventure! I had free passes to the NY Worlds Fair for as long as it was open.
New York was safe then, I believe Wagner was Mayor then. For the Architectural firm ( Charles Luckman Associates) I was involved with the New Madison Square Garden ( Mostly as office boy and then shop drawing checker)
Today I would NOT recommend anybody to go or even visit New York City. This is a sad statement but over the years disillusion has set in.


#4

To each his own; Teri (CT) loves Chicago, although she hates what it has become.

For my part, any big city is a good place to be from - as far from as you can get.


#5

Believe it or not, I used to be a ‘city girl’. The stores! The clothes! The lights! The action! All the magnificent things you could do!
But, at the same time, I was an avid hiker, canoe-er, dirt biker, (and street), fisherman, and skier. So living in CT, 45 mins. east of NYC, I had the best of both worlds.

As of the last 25 years, I couldn’t imagine living anywhere where I could see another home, much less in an apartment.
Yeeks; I’d lose it.

As if it wouldn’t be bad enough having people smothering you, ya got the gov’t smothering you on top of it??!!!

I’d REALLY lose it! :freaked:

Oh…But I did go watch the ball drop in '76(?). I was in a lambswool coat w/fur cuffs and hood that got drenched in sleet. My boyfriend’s car broke down, so we sat there freezing to death all night waiting for something to open.


#6

Why would you willingly chose to live in a big city? I can understand if you have to because of work or just the circumstances of life but I will gladly drive and hour to work if it means to see my nearest neighbor requires me to get in my car or ATV.


#7

[quote=“Seravee, post:6, topic:48046”]
Why would you willingly chose to live in a big city? I can understand if you have to because of work or just the circumstances of life but I will gladly drive and hour to work if it means to see my nearest neighbor requires me to get in my car or ATV.
[/quote]I can’t speak for other big cities and frankly I don’t like Washington, DC or Boston all that much. But New York is quite different. It combines very nice residential areas and building with thriving culture and throbbing business life. In many ways it is an ideal.


#8

Yes. “Ideal” for the tax hogs and those who keep voting them into office! New York has a CITY “income tax,” in addition to the federal and state income taxes.


#9

We have local income taxes in PA, too. They have them also in Ohio.


#10

…which MAY be why so many people are fleeing the rust-belt for more tax-friendly climes such as Florida and Texas–which don’t even have a STATE income tax. Did you know that IF you happen to retire in New York and then move to another State, New York will STILL claim the “right” to tax your income–even if you don’t live there any more?


#11

New York sounds like France - never gives up people who leave it.

Our little-bitty township has a 1% income tax. The state tax is .307 (or maybe it has gone up, they’ve been talking about raising it. But retirement income is not taxable in PA, so that’s a plus there. Sales tax is 6% - and I think they’re talking about raising that.


#12

[quote=“Pappadave, post:10, topic:48046”]
…which MAY be why so many people are fleeing the rust-belt for more tax-friendly climes such as Florida and Texas–which don’t even have a STATE income tax. Did you know that IF you happen to retire in New York and then move to another State, New York will STILL claim the “right” to tax your income–even if you don’t live there any more?
[/quote]If they leave for good, fine. If they plan to come back when they need assisted living or a nursing home I have a real problem.