Sarah Palin: Legalizing Weed Is 'No Big Deal'


#1

Sarah Palin: Legalizing Weed Is ‘No Big Deal’

When Hewitt expressed disbelief that Palin’s home state legalized recreational marijuana last year, she said the vote “didn’t surprise me.”“We’ve got that libertarian streak in us,” she said, explaining that Alaska, the most conservative state to legalize marijuana so far, already had lax marijuana laws, so it was a less divisive issue than in other states.
“I grew up in Alaska when pot was legal anyway. It was absolutely no big deal. I mean you didn’t smoke it because your parents would strangle you. And if you were a jock and you were, you know, a Christian going to youth group, you just didn’t do it, right?” Palin recalled. “And I still believe that. But when it comes to picking our battles, for many of us in Alaska, legalization of marijuana just was never really a bright blip on the radar screen.”

Yep. People who take “the sky will fall approach” stance seem to be paranoid and alarmist in general. The truth is, legalization will have little effect on supply or usage. It has always been readily available. People will ultimately choose for themselves whether they want to use it.


#2

That’s true, but ANYONE who thinks marijuana use won’t INCREASE from “legalization” is numb between the ears.


#3

I do think there would be an increase after legalization, if for no other reason than it becomes trendy. But I don’t think it would qualify as significant either. Smoking tobacco used to be trendy, but has been on steady decline since the 1950s and is at an all time low. Alcohol drinking rates have basically held steady since the 40s. My point is, when it comes to these sorts of substances, there is no exponential growth trend.


#4

[quote=“Pappadave, post:2, topic:47775”]
That’s true, but ANYONE who thinks marijuana use won’t INCREASE from “legalization” is numb between the ears.
[/quote]Depends on what kind of “legalization” you are talking about. Where I live it is to all intents and purposes “legalized” by the influx of users but I doubt it had much effect on the usage nationally.


#5

[quote=“Bigfoot_88, post:3, topic:47775”]
I do think there would be an increase after legalization, if for no other reason than it becomes trendy. But I don’t think it would qualify as significant either. Smoking tobacco used to be trendy, but has been on steady decline since the 1950s and is at an all time low. Alcohol drinking rates have basically held steady since the 40s. My point is, when it comes to these sorts of substances, there is no exponential growth trend.
[/quote]I think I am against commercilization (sp?) of marijuana. Keep it less than an approved behavior but not necessarily illegal except if voters want it to be illegal.


#6

WHAT? NONONONONONONO!! We can’t have PEOPLE CHOOSING FOR THEMSELVES!! That kind of radical thinking is dangerous…


#7

Usage will absolutely increase due to legalization, just as abortion numbers exploded after legalization; the
"Law" is still a source for perceived approval and morality by many in spite of all the evidence that the Judicial System is the most corrupt and evil element in United States history.

And I don’t know anyone who takes the “The sky is falling” attitude toward legalizing dope, the argument against legalization of recreational dope is that doing so in an environment that refuses to hold people adequately accountable for the results of their “decisions” will prevent the necessary self policing of ones own actions from occurring; resulting in an increase of victims who have their Rights assaulted via collateral damage.

The dope heads never argue for substantive accountability, only for legal dope; that is NOT an oversight on their part as they have zero intention of accepting personal responsibility for anything they do.


#8

They are going to have to learn accountability the hard way, by being held accountable, I’m afraid. That’s supposed to happen during your upbringing, so it’s going to come as a real shock to a lot of young people when they have to face up to a major failure or mistake. Some won’t learn no matter what, but none will until an accounting is held.


#9

[quote=“RET423, post:7, topic:47775”]
they have zero intention of accepting personal responsibility for anything they do.
[/quote]:yeahthat:


#10

Marijuana and abortion are poor comparisons. Marijuana supply cannot be effectively restricted. It’s a plant. Abortion clinics, on the other hand, are much harder to conceal and operate illegally. Some would argue that people try marijuana because it is illegal and offers an adventure and a feeling of rebellion.

I don’t see where you are going with the responsibility argument. Marijuana is not a craze-inducing drug. People would still not be allowed to drive while impaired (and the evidence indicates alcohol impairs more than pot). People smoking on private property is generally not going to be dangerous to others. I’m not a marijuana advocate (I don’t touch drugs or alcohol) but it is clearly less harmful than it has historically been portrayed.


#11

Don’t know anything about how this works, but I heard recently that people are started to “vape” marijuana, because it removes the smell, so they are less likely to be caught. Interesting how this would play out among those who wish to outlaw vaping, but embrace marijuana usage.


#12

Maybe I shouldn’t speak for others, but no one I knew ever based his/her decision of whether or not to smoke marijuana on the fact that it was illegal. I certainly never did. It never even crossed my mind.
The only people who worried about the illegality part were those who were moving vast quantities.

And although I think the abortion analogy is a poor one, I’d say the same is most likely true of that group, as well.

And I don’t know anyone who takes the “The sky is falling” attitude toward legalizing dope, the argument against legalization of recreational dope is that doing so in an environment that refuses to hold people adequately accountable for the results of their “decisions” will prevent the necessary self policing of ones own actions from occurring; resulting in an increase of victims who have their Rights assaulted via collateral damage.

The dope heads never argue for substantive accountability, only for legal dope; that is NOT an oversight on their part as they have zero intention of accepting personal responsibility for anything they do.

That sounds very much to me like someone who thinks ‘the sky is falling.’

From what I hear from those in CO, i.e., very strict accountability laws went into play on the very referendum - put in place by those who were advocating legalizing recreational use of marijuana.

I’m with Sarah Palin. It’s not that big of a deal, and barely makes a blip on my radar screen of things I need to worry about today.
I’m also with those who think the frowning upon it while not making THAT big of a deal about it would make a stronger impression on kids going through their ‘rebellious stage’ than stamping it with a ‘forbidden fruit’ message.

It worked w/my kids. I simply told them the truth. “Look, if you’re going to try pot, don’t be stupid enough to try it when you’re attempting you learn something: You won’t.”
…and they never tried it until they were in their 20’s, well out from under their parents’ rules, so my only place at that point was to ask if they’d learned anything.
“Actually, Mom, yes.” ~wink~


#13

Somehow, I doubt people who embrace marijuana usage have any desire to outlaw vaping as it saves vast quantities of otherwise wasted product.


#14

Vaporizing marijuana is nothing new. Musicians I worked for in the 70s used a thing called a “Tilt”. The way it was explained to me was that the Tilt was an elaborate pipe, that had an internal heat source which heated to 170 F, which is the temperature that the THC vaporized. So, only the drug was turned to smoke, and the rest was discarded. Mostly, I was told that they did this to avoid the carcinogens in the vegetative product.


#15

My context was that the law defines what is acceptable morality for many, this is a perfect comparison.

Nothing in my post addressed the issues of enforcement and the ability to enforce these laws was not the point of my post.

Which has nothing to do with whether usage would increase if dope were legal.

We do not demand adequate accountability for those who intentionally impair their judgment then harm others with the collateral damage of their actions, adding more options to legally impair their judgment will just increase the number of innocent victims who bear the consequences of the decisions that dopers make.

I have never heard a single dope head advocate for the correction of this issue before implementing their “libertarian” desire of legalizing recreational dope.

Drugs that impair motor skills and judgment increase the likelihood of irresponsible decisions and the ability to do things like drive in a reasonably safe manner, there is no “craze inducing” component needed for that.

Sure they would not “be allowed” to drive on dope, just as they are “not allowed” to drive drunk, the lack of effective accountability is why they drive drunk anyway and adding more dope to their option list without correcting this will only make it worse as more people use dope.

there is nothing “clear” except the reality that Liberty comes with responsibility, a lack of effective accountability combined with liberty creates nothing but victims and tyranny.


#16

[QUOTE=RET423]Liberty comes with responsibility[/QUOTE]
This is the whole crux of “independence” and “freedom.” Most people see “freedom” as “license” - meaning, I can do whatever I want with no accountability.


#17

Sorry, but I’ve SEEN, with my OWN eyes, the horrible damage marijuana use has done to people. You’ll NEVER convince me that it has ANY redeeming virtue other than reducing nausea from chemotherapy and MAYBE reducing damage from glaucoma. If you aren’t undergoing chemo or have medically-diagnosed glaucoma there is NO reason for marijuana use.


#18

Everyone you ever knew who smoked pot did so illegally just as everyone who ever got an abortion before Roe did so illegally, they ALL chose to ignore the law.

Abortions went from a few hundred to MILLIONS the moment abortion received the moral approval of government.

If the view of something extreme like taking the life of an innocent person can be publicly altered so dramatically by one court decision that endorsed the practice as a “Right” I doubt it is much of a stretch to think that a recreational drug would gain far more users if the government put its stamp of approval on the drug as acceptable for recreational use.

None of which would be an argument for keeping dope illegal if we were a people that still hung horse thieves and executed murderers. If we still scorned those who do not practice moderation as being of poor character and retained this public shame in the courtroom if their choices harmed an innocent, everything could be legal.

If using dope without the proper preparations to keep a polluted mind from making a decision that harms an innocent inspired an attitude of condemnation instead of inspiring an army of excuse makers to chant "It is a disease! We should give these poor suffering souls TREATMENT instead of punishing them", then we could allow nothing but personal preference to govern such actions as recreational dope consumption.

But we are NOT such a people, we excuse the guilty and we tell the innocent "Tough crap, live with whatever these scumbags do to you and keep your mouth shut".

And THAT is the argument against legalization, we are quite simply not a mature enough people to see that personal accountability must be considered in all discussions of Liberty; we are instead just children who simply “want what we want” and have no interest in considering the consequences and who have no plans to ever take responsibility for any of them.

We will indeed legalize dope everywhere without correcting the accountability issue, I have already lost this debate in the public square; and I am quite confident that my position will prove prophetic in a very short time. When that happens the dope advocacy crowd will say "It is not legalization that has caused all of this, that is just a simpletons explanation"

I always play the long game, this idea that our irresponsible and unaccountable society needs more readily available and legal ways to pollute our thinking and diminish our motor skills for recreational purposes is so profoundly bad that the “long game” will not take very long at all; and I will not hesitate to remind everyone that "Stupid is supposed to hurt so all of this should be no surprise".


#19

Same old conversation same old denying that there are consequences from those who think being high is a good thing. Story after story of consequences resulting from using this drug with no only lives lost, property damage, productivity effected, and families destroyed just flow over the heads of those who stand proudly and say “I am a drug addict and I am proud of it”.


#20

The war on drugs is an utter failure. We can’t even keep drugs out of our prisons. Didn’t we learn anything from Prohibition?