South Carolina valedictorian


#1

A South Carolina valedictorian garnered wild applause after he ripped up his pre-approved speech and delivered the Lord’s prayer at his high school graduation on Saturday.
The act was apparently in protest of the Pickens County School District’s decision to no longer include prayer at graduation ceremonies, Christian News reported. Officials said the decision was made after the district was barraged with complaints by atheist groups.
[LEFT]
But that didn’t stop Roy Costner IV of Liberty High School. He ripped up his graduation speech for all to see, before he started talking about his Christian upbringing, Christian News reported.
“Those that we look up to, they have helped carve and mold us into the young adults that we are today,” he said. “I’m so glad that both of my parents led me to the Lord at a young age.”
“And I think most of you will understand when I say…” he paused. “Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name…”
The auditorium began to erupt with applause and cheers.
“Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil,” he continued. “For Thine is the Kingdom and the power and the glory, forever and ever. Amen.”
Pickens County School District spokesman John Eby said that no disciplinary action will be taken against Mr. Costner.
[LEFT][COLOR=#000000]“The bottom line is, we’re not going to punish students for expressing their religious faiths,” he told Christian News. “He’s a graduate now. There’s nothing we can do about it, even if we wanted to.”
Attendee Logan Gibson told reporters that he thought “it took a lot of courage” to do what Mr. Costner did, Christian News reported.
As of noon Wednesday, a YouTube video of the exchange had received almost 45,000 views.
[LEFT][COLOR=#000000]
Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/…#ixzz2VNliy6QE
[/LEFT]
[/COLOR][/LEFT]
[/COLOR][/LEFT]


#2

More power to him!


#3

“Oh, well, we’re not going to discipline him. It’s too late anyway.” What a lame response!


#4

It is technically the best response. Schools need to stay our of religion so long as they are run with public funds. His response was neutral and right on the mark. The kid was already graduated. not much the school district can do to him. I have no problem with it really though I think he should consider that there are many people of different faith that may have been present. That is personal thing though as I hate preachy events. Which is rarely why I attend funerals. As my friend said at his moms funeral. It is about her not God or her religious beliefs. Whatever her beliefs are, are between her and her God. Take to mind that they are Christians but they do not wear there faith on their sleeves so to speak.


#5

But a Christian should wear his faith on his sleeves. I don’t mean that he should go around being preachy, but it should not be difficult to identify him as a Christian. The Great Commission tells us to spread the gospel everywhere. And really, maybe there are occasions when being “preachy” is in order, just not all the time.


#6

I agree. Public High School graduations are imo no the time or place to be preachy. You can tell a story with a christian moral but i think quoting scripture is a bit much.


#7

You can give your testimony anywhere. That’s not being preachy. And I disagree that quoting scripture makes something “preachy.” Have you ever heard someone say (maybe you have said it yourself) “Out of the mouths of babes”? Or “Nimrod, the mighty hunter”? or “I escaped by the skin of my teeth”? Those are all scripture. Of course, they are not used as scripture, and don’t apply to that situation, but I find myself frequently quoting a bit of scripture that applies to the current situation.


#8

Meanwhile everyone who isn’t Christian sat there awkwardly…


#9

This Susanna is what I am talking about. For me it is awkward to sit through things like this. Quoting scripture out of context like you gave examples of is completely different.


#10

Why did this spark controversy? A student has the right to express their religious beliefs.


#11

The liberals would have loved it if this fellow explained how to put a condom on a cucumber. After all who needs guidance when they have Obumer to care for them


#12

That is just hilarious but the truth!


#13

It sure would have been more interesting.

I’m guessing if this kid had read out an Islamic prayer and praised Allah that he would not be getting the same enthusiastic response here.


#14

Suz, that’s not at all what he said. Not in the least.

“The bottom line is, we’re not going to punish students for expressing their religious faiths,” he told Christian News. “He’s a graduate now. There’s nothing we can do about it, even if we wanted to.”

In short, they went ahead and let the atheists think they got what they wanted without making an act of Congress out of it.
…then went ahead with allowing the expression of religious faith, anyway.

Played it a lot smarter than I see many doing these days.
The atheists didn’t get a mountain of attention, which those running the school saw was all they really wanted.
Expression of religion prevails.

And next year they’ll probably go back to how they always did it.
After all, the valedictorian’s speech got a resounding applause.


#15

Wrong. It is not, “Freedom FROM religion;” it is “Freedom OF religion.”

His response was neutral and right on the mark. The kid was already graduated. not much the school district can do to him. I have no problem with it really though I think he should consider that there are many people of different faith that may have been present.

So? A graduation ceremony isn’t about those who were invited to watch it; it’s about the ones who are graduating.
Back in the '70’s when I graduated, they had a Minister of the Presbyterian Church do the ‘opening prayer’, and a Catholic Priest do the ‘closing prayer.’ Nobody got his nose bent out of joint. Anybody who can’t sit through 5 minutes of a generally accepted religious context without getting his nose bent out of joint needs to seek a shrink.

That is personal thing though as I hate preachy events. Which is rarely why I attend funerals. As my friend said at his moms funeral. It is about her, not God, or her religious beliefs. Whatever her beliefs are, are between her and her God. Take to mind that they are Christians but they do not wear there faith on their sleeves so to speak.

Huh? Generally speaking, a funeral IS inclusive of one’s religious beliefs. That’s the entire point for most people.

My parents wished for “Memorial Services,” rather than funerals; which leaves out the ‘preachy stuff,’ so that is what they were granted.
I didn’t have a problem with that, either.

To each his own.


#16

Maybe to you, but not to too many others.

I’m guessing if this kid had read out an Islamic prayer and praised Allah that he would not be getting the same enthusiastic response here.

Good guess.


#17

Conviction?..


#18

Oh, get real. Even twelve-year-olds are old enough to sit quietly in respect of an occassion, even if bored to tears.
Just what is it that has you feeling so “awkward”, anyway? Pulling up your Big Boy pants?

I swear, BOP, you do like to cling to the tiniest thread of a weed getting pulled. What I don’t understand is your insistence, much less, your interest; unless it is to yank chain for the fun of it.

Really; I’m about as non-conformist as it gets. And I’ll admit to yanking chain from time to time, myself. (The dryer, the more fun.)
But in this case?
Bah! 'Tis sticking pin pricks in a scan of wool. Accomplishes nothing beyond getting the knitter a mighty frown in the outcome of her work.


#19

They can just learn to be tolerant. My wife is Muslim and has no problems with Christian prayers at any event.


#20

Why do they feel awkward? My suspicion is that it is as FC said - conviction. God is using his word exactly the way He intended it to be used - to convict sinners, that they might hopefully seek after Him. And some do.