"The Grapes of Wrath" : Anyone Know if this is True?

A lady told me that there’s a new edition of, “The Grapes of Wrath” coming out, and due to that, hard-cover coppies are worth $1000, or there abouts.

I have a hard copy version. However, it’s a 1995 edition. IOW, nor even close to the original 1939 original, nor 1967 copyright renewal.

Any of you heard of the, Grapes of Wrath suddenly becoming valuable? And, if so, what do you think of my '95 edition being worth more than the $19.95 “Book of the Month Club” probably got for it?

Thing is, I’ve got a set of Steinbeck’s, and I don’t even know if I’d part with one of them, much less, The Grapes of Wrath..

Any thoughts?

[quote=“2cent, post:1, topic:44017”]
A lady told me that there’s a new edition of, “The Grapes of Wrath” coming out, and due to that, hard-cover coppies are worth $1000, or there abouts.

I have a hard copy version. However, it’s a 1995 edition. IOW, nor even close to the original 1939 original, nor 1967 copyright renewal.

Any of you heard of the, Grapes of Wrath suddenly becoming valuable? And, if so, what do you think of my '95 edition being worth more than the $19.95 “Book of the Month Club” probably got for it?

Thing is, I’ve got a set of Steinbeck’s, and I don’t even know if I’d part with one of them, much less, The Grapes of Wrath..

Any thoughts?
[/quote]1939, hard bound, Signed by the author, and in mint condition, about 40 grand.
1995 version, $3.00-26.00, depending on condition.

Tiny, I’m so sorry for not having replied sooner. 'Puter broke down, slept since then, and you know how that goes.

40 Grand? YOW!!!
However, it looks like I’ll be keeping my copy. Didn’t want to part w/it anyway, as I’ve a set of 7 of Steinbeck’s novels.

No problem, nice lady.
Yep, “slept since then” has a whole new meaning since I became a senior. Whew.

I don’t know much about antique books, except for the out of print reference books that I use for my hobbies.

The one thing I will say is that it’s sometimes hard to pinpoint values in the collectables market. If the $40,000 price tag for the mint state 1939, signed first edition came from an auction, it could be an outlier. If two collectors go nuts in an auction they can bid each other to ridiculous levels that won’t be duplicated for a long time if ever. I did that to myself once, and I hope I never do it again.

Later editions of the same thing usually are not worth nearly as much.

The example I can point to is the Washington Before Boston medal that was awarded to George Washington by the Continental Congress months BEFORE the signing of the Declaration of the Independence was signed in 1776. Congress voted to metal to Washington after he placed guns above Dorchester Heights which forced the British to leave Boston Harbor. This was at the very beginning of the war, and was more of a symbolic victory than a major one. The war would continue for another six years.

Washington would get his medal in 1789. The medal awarded to Washington was in gold. It is now held by the Boston Public Library. Others were made in silver and copper.

Those other medals, in copper, that were made with THE SAME SET OF DIES are worth perhaps $10,000 to $12,000 or more in the top conditions. Later examples have been made over the years from different dies. There have been at least six different issues of the medal. The very latest ones are worth about $40 to $50. The design is the same, and in some cases it takes a expert to tell the difference, but as you can see the values can vary a lot, depending on when the item was made.

The bottom line is that the later editions are often worth less, sometimes a lot less.